Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
31,610
2,158
113
Senegalese government says diplomat 'savagely beaten' by Gatineau police
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Aug 06, 2022 • 22 hours ago • 1 minute read • 13 Comments

GATINEAU, Que. — The government of Senegal is accusing Canadian police of “savagely” beating one of its diplomats.


The Senegalese Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a release made public on Friday that the diplomat, who works at the West African nation’s embassy in Ottawa, was handcuffed and beaten at her Gatineau, Que., home on Aug. 2.

The ministry says she was taken to hospital due to her injuries, which they say included breathing problems, but did not immediately offer further details on her condition.

Gatineau police said in a release responding to the allegations made by the Senegalese government that they arrested a woman after she hit a police officer in the face.

They say she was tackled to the ground after allegedly biting another officer.

Police say the woman did not complain about injuries while she was detained.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
31,610
2,158
113
Viral video of Mississippi arrest sparks investigation
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michael Goldberg
Publishing date:Aug 08, 2022 • 10 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
A video shows the arrest of Eugene Lewis in Jackson, Miss.
A video shows the arrest of Eugene Lewis in Jackson, Miss. PHOTO BY SCREEN GRAB /Facebook video
JACKSON, Miss. — An incident involving a white Mississippi Highway Patrol officer and three Black men is under investigation after a viral video showed the officer putting a handcuffed man into a chokehold and wrestling him into a ditch.

The video, captured on Friday in McComb by a man named Packer Lewis, sparked outrage over the officer’s conduct.

The video shows one of Lewis’ brothers, Eugene Lewis, standing in the street in handcuffs as Packer Lewis and another brother, Darius Lewis, yell that they are recording the incident. Suddenly, the officer grabs Eugene Lewis by the neck and pulls him across the street, tackling him to the ground. At one point, the officer appears to use his knee to pin him down.

“That’s how George Floyd died,” Packer Lewis yelled while recording a livestream on Facebook, referring to the 2020 murder of Floyd, a Black man who was pinned under a Minneapolis police officer’s knee for more than nine minutes.

Packer Lewis said the Mississippi officer became aggressive after he told the Lewis brothers to leave the scene.

“He said y’all need to leave. It’s not y’all business. We said it’s our business because it’s our brother,” Lewis told the Associated Press on Monday.

After detaining Eugene Lewis in a police car, the officer then walked toward the other two brothers and pointed a weapon at one of them. After another officer arrived, Packer and Darius Lewis were then arrested.

Public officials said an investigation is underway. Authorities have not identified the officer involved nor said what prompted Eugene Lewis to be placed in handcuffs. Packer Lewis said his brother was pulled over for allegedly speeding and then was arrested for having an expired license.

“The Mississippi Department of Public Safety was made aware of an incident involving a Mississippi Highway Patrolman conducting an arrest on a subject in McComb, MS,” said Bailey Martin, a spokesperson for the Mississippi Department of Public Safety. “This incident is being reviewed internally by the Department of Public Safety. The Mississippi Bureau of Investigation is also conducting an inquiry.”

McComb Mayor Quordiniah Lockley urged patience as an investigation unfolds.

“I know that many of you like myself, have viewed the video of the Mississippi Highway Patrol Officer and Mr. Eugene Lewis. I am alarmed as well as disturbed over it,” Lockley said. “I ask that you allow the investigation to be completed but at the same time let your voice be heard.”

Lockley said he contacted State Representative Daryl Porter Jr. and asked him to intervene on behalf of the City of McComb since it involved Mississippi Highway Patrol, which is the state’s jurisdiction.

In a statement, Porter, Jr., a Democrat from Summit, said the commissioner of public safety told him the incident is being investigated by the Internal Affairs and the Mississippi Bureau of Investigation.

Packer Lewis said his brothers were released from jail Friday night, but he was kept up until Sunday night because of a past charge on his criminal record. He said he is facing eight charges related to the incident, including obstruction of justice. He is still processing Friday’s events several days later.

“I was kind of shocked because I’ve seen this type of activity on TV. But I never thought I’d be hands-on with it. I never thought I’d be a part of something like this.”

The incident occurred less than a month after the firing of the police chief in Lexington, 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of McComb. The Mississippi Center For Investigative Reporting said the Lexington police chief was caught on tape using racial slurs and talking about how many people he killed in the line of duty.

Howard Henderson, the director of the Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, said Lewis’ video displayed “bad policing 101.”

“He seems to obviously have lost control of himself, and he almost looked like he was afraid of the gentleman recording. And because of that, he overreacted in the moment,” Henderson said.

Henderson said police departments should hire more Black police officers, as they bring a different perspective to the job than their white colleagues.

A 2017 Pew Research survey of police officers found that 72% of white police officers but fewer than half of all Black officers view police killings of Black people as “isolated incidents,” instead of “signs of a broader problem between.”

These disparities beget distrust, and distrust begets poor policing, Henderson said.

“Trust in the community is fundamental to successful policing. And only through police conduct are you able to improve community interactions and promote a shared responsibility for addressing crime and disorder,” Henderson said. “When that trust is broken down, you destroy the ability of a police department to be effective at doing the job society has said it needs to do.”

——

Michael Goldberg is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/mikergoldberg.
1660038894551.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
31,610
2,158
113
Grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michael Goldberg And Allen G. Breed
Publishing date:Aug 09, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation

JACKSON, Miss. — A Mississippi grand jury has declined to indict the white woman whose accusation set off the lynching of Black teenager Emmett Till nearly 70 years ago, most likely closing the case that shocked a nation and galvanized the modern civil rights movement.


After hearing more than seven hours of testimony from investigators and witnesses, a Leflore County grand jury last week determined there was insufficient evidence to indict Carolyn Bryant Donham on charges of kidnapping and manslaughter, Leflore County District Attorney Dewayne Richardson said in a news release Tuesday.

The decision comes despite recent revelations about an unserved arrest warrant and the 87-year-old Donham’s unpublished memoir.

The Rev. Wheeler Parker, Jr., Emmett Till’s cousin and the last living witness to Till’s Aug. 28, 1955, abduction, said Tuesday’s announcement is “unfortunate, but predictable.”

“The prosecutor tried his best, and we appreciate his efforts, but he alone cannot undo hundreds of years of anti-Black systems that guaranteed those who killed Emmett Till would go unpunished, to this day,” Parker said in a statement.


“The fact remains that the people who abducted, tortured, and murdered Emmett did so in plain sight, and our American justice system was and continues to be set up in such a way that they could not be brought to justice for their heinous crimes.”

Ollie Gordon, another one of Till’s cousins, told The Associated Press that some justice had been served in the Till case, despite the grand jury’s decision.

“Justice is not always locking somebody up and throwing the keys away,” Gordon said. “Ms. Donham has not gone to jail. But in many ways, I don’t think she’s had a pleasant life. I think each day she wakes up, she has to face the atrocities that have come because of her actions.”

A third cousin, Deborah Watts, who leads the Emmett Till Legacy Foundation, said the case is an example of the freedom afforded to white women to escape accountability for making false accusations against Black men.


“She has still escaped any accountability in this case,” Watts said. “So the grand jury’s decision is disappointing, but we’re still going to be calling for justice for Emmett Till. It’s not over.”

An email and voicemail seeking comment from Donham’s son Tom Bryant weren’t immediately returned Tuesday.

In June, a group searching the basement of the Leflore County Courthouse discovered the unserved arrest warrant charging Donham, then-husband Roy Bryant and brother-in-law J.W. Milam in Till’s abduction in 1955. While the men were arrested and acquitted on murder charges in Till’s subsequent slaying, Donham, 21 at the time, was never taken into custody.

The 14-year-old Chicago boy was visiting relatives in Mississippi when he and some other children went to the store in the town of Money where Carolyn Bryant worked. Relatives told the AP that Till had whistled at the white woman, but denied that he touched her as she’d claimed.


In an unpublished memoir obtained last month by the AP, Donham said Milam and her husband brought Till to her in the middle of the night for identification but that she tried to help the youth by denying it was him. She claimed that Till then volunteered that he was the one they were looking for.

Till’s battered, disfigured body was found days later in a river, where it was weighted down with a heavy metal fan. The decision by his mother, Mamie Till Mobley, to open Till’s casket for his funeral in Chicago demonstrated the horror of what had happened and added fuel to the civil rights movement.

Following their acquittal, Bryant and Milam admitted to the abduction and killing in an interview with Look magazine. They were not charged with a federal crime, and both have long since died.


In 2004, the U.S. Department of Justice Department opened an investigation of Till’s killing after it received inquiries about whether charges could be brought against anyone still living.

Till’s body was exhumed, in part to confirm it was he. A 2005 autopsy found that Till died of a gunshot wound to the head, and that had fractures in his wrist bones, skull and femur.

In 2006, the FBI launched its Cold Case Initiative in an effort to identify and investigate racially-motivated murders. Two years later, Congress passed the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act.

The Justice Department said the statute of limitations had run out on any potential federal crime, but the FBI worked with state investigators to determine if state charges could be brought. In February 2007, a Mississippi grand jury declined to indict anyone, and the Justice Department announced it was closing the case.


But federal officials announced last year that they were once again closing their investigation, saying there was “insufficient evidence to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that she lied to the FBI.”

Timothy Tyson, the North Carolina historian who interviewed Donham for his 2017 book, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” said the newly rediscovered warrant did nothing to “appreciably change the concrete evidence against her.” But he said the renewed focus on the case should “compel Americans” to face the racial and economic disparities that still exist here.

“The Till case will not go away because the racism and ruthless indifference that created it remain with us,” Tyson wrote in an email Tuesday. “We see generations of Black children struggle against these obstacles, and many die due to systemic racism that is every bit as lethal as a rope or a revolver.”

For Gordon, the renewed attention on the Till case has been a reminder of the social progress it helped spark.

“It helps the younger generations identify how far we’ve come with the many liberties and civil rights that we’ve gained since Emmett’s death,” Gordon said. “As his mother would say, his death was not in vain.”
1660131528937.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
31,610
2,158
113
Black Missouri family says racism led to pool party cancellation
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Publishing date:Aug 09, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation

LEE’S SUMMIT, Mo. (AP) — A Black family says racism prompted officials at a suburban Kansas City water park to cancel a private pool party for their 17-year-old son’s birthday during the weekend.


Chris Evans said he signed a contract with Summit Waves Aquatic Facility in Lee’s Summit to host 250 people for the party on Saturday. But when his sons arrived at the park they were told the reservation was canceled and were not given a reason, Evans said at a news conference Tuesday.

Evans said he and his wife learned while they were on the way to the water park that “this event doesn’t represent Lee’s Summit Waves and that my reservation was canceled because (a park official) was uncomfortable,” The Kansas City Star reported.

That official, flanked by police officers, met the parents when they arrived and reiterated that the party would not be held.

“What are you scared of, Lee’s Summit?” Evans asked at the news conference. “Why are you uncomfortable?”



Lee’s Summit Parks and Recreation Department, which operates the water park, said in a statement issued Tuesday that it apologized to the Evans family because of miscommunication and missed processes that led to the cancellation.

The statement said its investigation found the department failed to arrange additional security for the party, which Evans paid for as part of his contract. Parks officials said the event was promoted on social media although the contract said that would not happen.

After several unsuccessful efforts to reach the Evans, the department decided to cancel the party, according to the statement.

“Safety pertaining to the anticipated crowd size and the potential impact it might have on party guests and the staff was the sole reason for the cancellation,” the statement said.


Park department officials said up to 500 people showed up in the parking lot for the party but Evans countered the event was canceled before the teenagers arrived and there was “never anything close to 500 kids in the parking lot.”

“My kids were heartbroken that the party was canceled,” he said. “They are good kids who make good grades, have bright futures and do not deserve to be treated like this. And that goes for all the kids at the park that day.”

Lee’s Summit Mayor William Baird on Tuesday criticized the department’s handling of the incident and denounced “appalling” statements he said a park employee made on social media after the incident.

“We must intentionally embrace a culture that is welcoming and inclusive, and we must continually denounce any urge or impulse to exclude,” he said.

The parks department’s statement on Tuesday said its administrator apologized to the Evans family for “the inappropriate and insensitive language” used by staff and said appropriate actions would be taken.

The department said it would review its rental processes, including communication, and improve training to align with the city’s diversity and inclusion efforts.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
31,610
2,158
113
Sesame Place to train workers on diversity after lawsuit
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Publishing date:Aug 10, 2022 • 16 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation

PHILADELPHIA — Sesame Place has announced the implementation of diversity and inclusion training for its employees following a $25 million class-action lawsuit alleging multiple incidents of discrimination after outcry sparked from a video of a costumed character snubbing two 6-year-old Black girls went viral online.


The Sesame Street-themed park, operated by SeaWorld Parks, in a statement Tuesday said that all employees will be mandated to participate in training created to address bias, promote inclusion and prevent discrimination by the end of September.

The training — which was developed by civil rights educators — will also be integrated into onboarding for all new employees and “will become a regular part of our training and workforce development,” the statement said.

Outrage ensued online in July when a video went viral showing a Sesame Street character waving off the two Black girls during a parade at Sesame Place. Jodi Brown, the mother of one of the girls, posted the video on Instagram.

President of Sesame Place Philadelphia Cathy Valeriano said the park has already begun implementing temporary measures while a review of the park continues.



“We are committed to making sure our guests feel welcome, included and enriched by their visits to our park,” Valeriano said.

SeaWorld’s CEO, Marc Swanson, is scheduled to meet with the Brown family alongside Rev. Jesse Jackson on Thursday to “address the deficiencies we have noted from this most recent press release,” said B’Ivory LaMarr, the family’s attorney.