Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

IdRatherBeSkiing

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‘JUST HUMILIATING’: Black woman accuses Delta of moving her to back of plane for white passengers
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Publishing date:Mar 01, 2022 • 13 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A Delta airlines aircraft landing from Los Angeles at Kingsford Smith International airport on October 31, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images)
A Delta airlines aircraft landing from Los Angeles at Kingsford Smith International airport on October 31, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images) PHOTO BY JAMES D. MORGAN /Getty Images
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A Black woman from California claims she was forced to move to the back row of her Delta flight to make room for two white women.
I doubt she was moved because she was black.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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I doubt she was moved because she was black.
I doubt you would understand the significance of "back of the plane for the convenience of Whites" to a Black American.

Nope, for once I'm not just bashing you. Various groups have different reactions to things. Jewish people tend to react badly to Nazi jokes. You're unlikely to get a positive reaction to talking about the glories of the Empire in an Irish bar. Natives generally ain't real thrilled to hear about what a hell of a guy Custer was.

When you work in a public-service job, it's just smart to have some radar for these nuances. Not saying the lady had any "rights" (except the "right" to occupy the seat listed on her ticket), just that some sensitivity to nuance is part of what makes the difference between Applebee's and a five-star restaurant.

Delta's OK with being Applebee's, apparently. This ain't the first incident of racial insensitivity amongst its employees. I'm OK with it. Whatever consequences they get, they chose.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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I doubt you would understand the significance of "back of the plane for the convenience of Whites" to a Black American.

Nope, for once I'm not just bashing you. Various groups have different reactions to things. Jewish people tend to react badly to Nazi jokes. You're unlikely to get a positive reaction to talking about the glories of the Empire in an Irish bar. Natives generally ain't real thrilled to hear about what a hell of a guy Custer was.

When you work in a public-service job, it's just smart to have some radar for these nuances. Not saying the lady had any "rights" (except the "right" to occupy the seat listed on her ticket), just that some sensitivity to nuance is part of what makes the difference between Applebee's and a five-star restaurant.

Delta's OK with being Applebee's, apparently. This ain't the first incident of racial insensitivity amongst its employees. I'm OK with it. Whatever consequences they get, they chose.
I have been asked to move as a single traveler many times. I usually decline if the new seat is not to my liking. But it sounds to me this is what happened in this case. The person who was moved happened to be black and the seat happened to be at the back (usually the last seats taken).
 

Tecumsehsbones

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I have been asked to move as a single traveler many times. I usually decline if the new seat is not to my liking. But it sounds to me this is what happened in this case. The person who was moved happened to be black and the seat happened to be at the back (usually the last seats taken).
Absolutely. There's no way in hell (ok, maybe that's giving in more than it deserves. Let's make it "There's no way in heck") this should be in the papers at all. But since it is, I decided to treat it as a "teachable moment."

I assume you're not a Black American. Is that correct? If not, change not a word of what I've said.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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Absolutely. There's no way in hell (ok, maybe that's giving in more than it deserves. Let's make it "There's no way in heck") this should be in the papers at all. But since it is, I decided to treat it as a "teachable moment."

I assume you're not a Black American. Is that correct? If not, change not a word of what I've said.
I am neither black nor American. And I have been asked which is why I gave the benefit of the doubt.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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I have usually been asked to accommodate people who are traveling together who were too cheap to pay for advance seat selection and are stuck with 2 middle seats. I usually decline for a middle seat since I usually pay for advance seat selection.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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I have usually been asked to accommodate people who are traveling together who were too cheap to pay for advance seat selection and are stuck with 2 middle seats. I usually decline for a middle seat since I usually pay for advance seat selection.
Sounds reasonable to me, not that you do, or should, give a rap what I find reasonable.
 

petros

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If she is the mass of two white women chances are also high the steward with the weekend load master course is balancing the plane.
 

spaminator

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‘JUST HUMILIATING’: Black woman accuses Delta of moving her to back of plane for white passengers
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Publishing date:Mar 01, 2022 • 13 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A Delta airlines aircraft landing from Los Angeles at Kingsford Smith International airport on October 31, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images)
A Delta airlines aircraft landing from Los Angeles at Kingsford Smith International airport on October 31, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images) PHOTO BY JAMES D. MORGAN /Getty Images
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A Black woman from California claims she was forced to move to the back row of her Delta flight to make room for two white women.

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Camille Henderson was travelling to California from Atlanta on Delta Air Lines last month when she was hit with the odd request, reported KGO.

Henderson was in a window seat in row 15 when two women seated in the row next to her, in the aisle and middle seats, complained about their seat assignment.

“They felt like they were ticketed first-class seats, but they couldn’t provide the tickets,” Henderson told the news outlet, adding that they complained about it for more than an hour.

Delta’s flight attendants’ solution? Move Henderson to the back of the plane, so the woman could have more space.

Once a flight attendant determined Henderson was flying alone, she was assigned a seat in the last row.

Henderson, who said the crew did not ask the women to move themselves, reluctantly agreed to go to the back row, according to the outlet.

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She complained to a Delta customer service representative who didn’t understand Henderson’s complaint, even suggesting there was no inconvenience since she was moved to another aisle seat in economy.

A Delta Airlines spokesperson issued a statement to the outlet.

“We are looking into this situation to better understand what happened. Delta has no tolerance for discrimination in any form and these allegations run counter to our deeply-held values of respecting and honouring the diversity of our customers.”

Henderson, however, vowed to “never again” fly Delta.

“Me, as a Black woman, I was displaced to make two white women comfortable,” she said. “I just want them to acknowledge that they made me feel powerless, and they can’t do that to customers moving forward.”
blacks are volatile. best to pack their asses in the back. 💡 ;)
 

Dixie Cup

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These types of stories I usually take with a grain of salt as most of the time there's more to the story - they've just sensationalized it.

This is the type of story that "divides" people and it drives me crazy. If it was racially inspired, then by all means, address it because it's unconscionable. But if it's the airline people asked her if she wouldn't mind moving, she could have said no but instead took it and then complained afterwards, that's on her.

So I wouldn't pay it too much attention until the full story becomes available with the facts of the situation rather than propaganda to prove that the U.S. is systemically racist - it's not!!
 

Tecumsehsbones

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These types of stories I usually take with a grain of salt as most of the time there's more to the story - they've just sensationalized it.

This is the type of story that "divides" people and it drives me crazy. If it was racially inspired, then by all means, address it because it's unconscionable. But if it's the airline people asked her if she wouldn't mind moving, she could have said no but instead took it and then complained afterwards, that's on her.

So I wouldn't pay it too much attention until the full story becomes available with the facts of the situation rather than propaganda to prove that the U.S. is systemically racist - it's not!!
Heck, I won't even pay it any mind then. Plenty of bigger fish to fry.
 

spaminator

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Montreal parking agent discriminated against Black Uber driver, judge rules
Diterbrun Faustin wanted to know why a parking agent twice mentioned he's a Black man on the ticket he received: "I didn't see why it was relevant."

Author of the article:Jesse Feith • Montreal Gazette
Publishing date:Mar 11, 2022 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 9 Comments
On the ticket issued to Uber driver Diterbrun Faustin, the agent described noticing a "Black driver" waiting with his hazard lights on. He noted it looked like the man was asleep. Then, the agent added, "an individual locked his car with his remote and the 'beep' sound made the Black driver leave."
On the ticket issued to Uber driver Diterbrun Faustin, the agent described noticing a "Black driver" waiting with his hazard lights on. He noted it looked like the man was asleep. Then, the agent added, "an individual locked his car with his remote and the 'beep' sound made the Black driver leave." PHOTO BY JOHN MAHONEY /Montreal Gazette files
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Uber driver Diterbrun Faustin was picking up a client in downtown Montreal when he received a message through the ride-hailing app: the person who ordered the ride was running a bit late, and wanted to know if Faustin could wait.

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Agreeing to, Faustin pulled up next to the building on McGill St., made sure the Uber sticker was visible on his car and put his hazard lights on. As he waited, he noticed a city parking agent nearby.

Faustin didn’t think twice about it until six weeks later, in March 2020, when he received a ticket in the mail. Faustin had stopped his car in an area reserved for public transportation, it said. He was to pay a $170 fine.

With more than 15 years of experience in the taxi industry, Faustin believed he was within his rights that night. But there was also something else that bothered him: Why, in the parking agent’s brief description on the ticket, did he feel the need to twice say Faustin is a Black man?

“I didn’t see why it was relevant,” Faustin, 42, said in an interview this week. “Why would a person’s race need to be mentioned for a ticket?”

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Faustin contested the ticket, and last month a Montreal municipal court judge ruled in his favour.

Judge Randall Richmond not only found that Faustin had the right to stop where he did, but said he would have stayed the case regardless: Faustin’s charter rights were violated that night, he ruled, due to racial discrimination.

Faustin had been ticketed under a section of Quebec’s Highway Safety Code that prohibits anyone from stopping in a “zone” reserved for public transportation.

On the ticket, the agent described noticing a “Black driver” waiting with his hazard lights on. He noted it looked like the man was asleep. Then, the agent added, “an individual locked his car with his remote and the ‘beep’ sound made the Black driver leave.”

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Representing himself in court, Faustin denied ever being asleep. Through Uber, he was able to confirm he picked up a client at the address that evening and had received a message from them asking him to briefly wait outside. He also told the court that had the agent simply asked him to move, he would have done so without issue.

Under Quebec’s Highway Safety Code, in similar situations, it’s up to the parking agent’s discretion whether they ask a driver to move or decide to issue a ticket instead. But, Richmond asked in his ruling, what if racial discrimination influences that discretionary power?

Richmond concluded he could not find any valid reason for the agent to mention Faustin is a Black man. Especially, he said, because the infraction in question doesn’t require the driver’s identity to be proven. A parking agent usually notes a licence plate number, and it’s the car’s owner — not necessarily the person driving it at the time — who’s responsible for the ticket.

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Given that parking agents are well aware of the process, the judge continued, Faustin had every reason to question why his race was brought into the matter.

“The evidence convinces me, on a balance of probabilities,” Richmond ruled, “that racial discrimination was at least one of the factors in how the agent used their discretionary power.”

The parking agent in question is not named in the court ruling. In an email response on Friday, the city of Montreal said it has taken note of the decision and reiterated it has a “zero-tolerance policy” toward all forms of discrimination.

A spokesperson said the comptroller general’s office, along with the Agence de mobilité durable, “has undertaken an investigation into the circumstances of the event and the work of the parking agent involved.”

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Faustin, for his part, said he’s satisfied with the judge’s findings. When he learned of the ruling this week, he made a point of sharing it with his friends and family members.

Asked why, Faustin said he knows visible minorities might sometimes be afraid to go before a judge.

“But I think there’s a lesson in all of this,” he said. “I told them if something like this ever happens to you, and you feel you were within your rights, you need to defend them all the way.”

jfeith@postmedia.com

twitter.com/jessefeith
 
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spaminator

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OPP DNA DRAGNET: The wrong thing for the right reason?
A violent sexual assault. Police racing the clock. A controversial step that helped solve the crime, but which critics charge was 'clearly discrimination.'

Author of the article:Jonathan Juha
Publishing date:Mar 13, 2022 • 1 day ago • 6 minute read • 10 Comments
OPP Insp. Dwight Peer speaking at a 2013 news conference in London as police announced the arrest of Henry Cooper, a migrant worker from Trinidad and Tobago, following an investigation into a violent sexual assault near Vienna, in Elgin County. (Free Press file photo)
OPP Insp. Dwight Peer speaking at a 2013 news conference in London as police announced the arrest of Henry Cooper, a migrant worker from Trinidad and Tobago, following an investigation into a violent sexual assault near Vienna, in Elgin County. (Free Press file photo)
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A violent sexual assault. Police under pressure from a ticking clock. A controversial step that helped solve the crime, but which critics are calling “clearly discrimination.” Both sides — lawyers for the migrant workers targeted in a DNA sweep, and local Provincial Police — have made their arguments to a human rights tribunal. As they await a ruling, reporter Jonathan Juha spoke to experts and people on both sides about the investigation, the complaint and whether police did the wrong thing for the right reason.

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VIENNA — Near the end of a chilly, wet, late-autumn Saturday in this Southwestern Ontario village nearly nine years ago, a woman who lived alone stepped out on her porch for a smoke.

A man burst from the shadows, put a knife to her throat and dragged her into the house. He blindfolded her, bound her with shoelaces, sexually assaulted her and threatened to kill her if she called police.

The Oct. 19, 2013, attack sparked a sweeping police probe around the Elgin County community. Within six weeks, provincial police had charged Henry Cooper, a 35-year-old migrant worker from Trinidad and Tobago. He later would plead guilty to sexual assault with a weapon, forcible confinement and uttering death threats, drawing a seven-year prison term.

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“There was a huge expectation that the OPP would be able to find out who was responsible for this senseless crime,” OPP Insp. Dwight Peer said at the time. “It’s my hope that this apprehension will begin the process of healing so necessary in incidents such as this.”

Case closed? Not quite. Not even close, in fact.

The victim had described her attacker as a Black man and likely a migrant worker, based on his accent – details that would open a crucial door for investigators, but give rise to troubling concerns for civil-rights activists.

More than eight years after the vicious attack shook this tiny rural community, the OPP defended its actions in a discrimination case argued recently before the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.

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At the case’s core is a police DNA dragnet targeting migrant workers in the area – a move police contend helped crack the case, but lawyers for 54 migrant worker applicants call discriminatory and racial profiling.

The legal and ethical question, in essence, is this: Do the ends justify the means?

Would it have been better for police – knowing most migrant workers were set to fly home soon, with harvests done – to conduct a more precise search for the suspect, even if that meant risking the perpetrator’s escape and the victim never seeing justice?

***

Cooper was one of the few workers who refused to co-operate with the DNA dragnet, leading police to zero in on him. Officers got his DNA from a cigarette butt and other evidence and matched it to a DNA profile of the suspect generated from a sexual assault kit and evidence left at the scene. He was arrested before his scheduled departure from Canada.

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The DNA sweep of migrant workers was clearly an effective investigative strategy, but one critics have ripped as racist – arguing it was too broad, based only on race and ignored other characteristics described by the victim.

The suspect, for instance, was described as Black, five-foot-10 to six-feet tall and clean-shaven. But investigators collected samples from workers who were much older and much taller or shorter, and ignored other alibis provided by workers.

“The OPP treated all Black and Brown migrant farm workers they encountered as potential suspects, even those that cannot possibly have been responsible for the crime,” Shane Martínez, pro bono counsel for the workers, said during the recent human rights hearing.

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Chris Ramsaroop, national organizer with the non-profit group Justice for Migrant Workers, wonders if police would have taken a similar step if they weren’t dealing with a marginalized group like off-shore farm workers with precarious jobs.

Part of a seasonal migrant workers program, Henry Cooper worked at this Elgin County farm a few kilometres from the home of the woman Cooper sexually assaulted. (JONATHAN JUHA, The London Free Press)
Part of a seasonal migrant workers program, Henry Cooper worked at this Elgin County farm a few kilometres from the home of the woman Cooper sexually assaulted. (JONATHAN JUHA, The London Free Press)
Southwestern Ontario’s vast farm belt, especially its fruit and vegetable sector, relies on thousands of temporary foreign workers on its farms and in its massive greenhouses. The work is often difficult manual labour that many Canadians won’t do.

“There’s a reason why this happened in rural Ontario,” Ramsaroop said of what he called “racialized policing” tactics.

“This is a vulnerable population, and I think everybody expected that there would be no response, that there would be no public outcry,” he said. “It’s concerning that this DNA sweep happened, how it happened . . . and it sets a dangerous precedent.”

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***

There may be an explanation for police ignoring finer points of the victim’s description, one criminologist suggested, noting “some features that may be described” are “more reliable than others” for police.

“If somebody says that the person was white, well, there’s no sense in searching in a predominantly Black community, right?” said Paul Whitehead, a former longtime Western University professor. “On the other hand, if somebody tells you the height or the weight of a person, that’s apt to be somewhat less reliable, because it’s more difficult to determine.

“You can’t just take a few characteristics and think that alone is going to help you identify the suspect or the perpetrator. It’s important to have a broad enough view to be able to test for DNA or have people not give samples in the first place.”

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The DNA sweep targeted people who matched the general description of the suspect and who worked on five farms in the area at the time of the attack, said Christopher Diana, a lawyer who represented the OPP at the human rights hearing.

“The OPP had good reason to be confident of the general description of a migrant worker,” he said. “But the OPP also knew that the victim’s description of the height, build, age and appearance may not be accurate.”

Whitehead, however, does not give the police probe a free pass.

Brad Fishleigh, then an OPP inspector and commander of the force’s Egin County detachment, announces the arrest of a 35-year-old migrant farm worker from Trinidad and Tobago in a violent rural sexual assault during a 2013 news conference in London. (Free Press file photo)
Brad Fishleigh, then an OPP inspector and commander of the force’s Egin County detachment, announces the arrest of a 35-year-old migrant farm worker from Trinidad and Tobago in a violent rural sexual assault during a 2013 news conference in London. (Free Press file photo)
“Just because they happened to find the right person doesn’t mean that they did the search correctly,” he said. “The test of whether the search was done correctly is not the outcome; the test is how that search conforms to the rules and best practices for police doing searches.”

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That view was echoed by Derek Silva, an associate professor of criminology at King’s University College in London.

“I think people often focus too much on whether or not this will make it harder for police to do their job,” he said.

“I think the other the other side of the equation . . . is that moments like these, if it is determined that (police) acted inappropriately, are . . . absolutely foundational to keeping police accountable and making sure that they’re not overstepping their powers and their authority.

“That is an important function of democracy that we can’t forget.”

The victim of the crime soon moved from the home, nearby residents say. Free Press attempts to contact her were unsuccessful.

Martínez is seeking $30,000 in damages for each worker he’s representing in the case.

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If the tribunal finds there was a violation of Ontario’s human rights code, another hearing will be scheduled to decide on “non-monetary and systemic remedies” for the migrant workers and prevent similar cases in future.

Marla Burstyn is presiding over the case for the tribunal. Her decision is expected within six months.

jjuha@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/JuhaatLFPress
 

spaminator

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Black Lives Matter used $6M in donations for California mansion: Report
A BLM board member claims that the mansion does not serve as anyone's personal residence and the space will be for housing and studios.

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 05, 2022 • 22 hours ago • 2 minute read • 36 Comments
Patrisse Cullors, Black Lives Matter co-founder, participates in the "Finding Justice" panel during the BET presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington in Pasadena, Calif. Feb. 11, 2019,
Patrisse Cullors, Black Lives Matter co-founder, participates in the "Finding Justice" panel during the BET presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington in Pasadena, Calif. Feb. 11, 2019, PHOTO BY WILLY SANJUAN /Invision/AP
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Social justice firebrands Black Lives Matter allegedly used $6 million in donations to buy a posh California mansion, New York Magazine reports.

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According to the magazine, three of the movement’s leading lights — Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Melina Abdullah — recorded a video last June at the “secretly bought” home.

They were noting the first anniversary of George Floyd’s murder.

Earlier, the New York Post reported that Cullors bought four premium homes for $3.2 million. She told pals after the revelations that she was in “survival mode.”

“It’s because we’re powerful, because we are winning,” Cullors said of what she slammed as right-wing media attacks. “It’s because we are threatening the establishment, we’re threatening white supremacy.”

The most recent purchase by the posh protesters is reportedly a 6,500-square-foot palace with seven bedrooms and bathrooms and amenities like a pool and parking for more than 20 cars.

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New York Magazine said the mansion was purchased in October 2020. Funds for the manse were allegedly donated to the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation (BLMGNF).

A man named Dyane Pascall allegedly is the one who paid for the home two weeks after BLMGNF received $66.5 million from its fiscal sponsor earlier that month. He is the financial manager for Janaya and Patrisse Consulting — an LLC operated by Cullors and her spouse, Janaya Khan, the mag reported.

But within a week, the ownership was transferred to an opaque Delaware company concealing the purchaser.

BLM co-founder Cullors resigned from the group last May after the New York Post report on the inner circle’s high-flying lifestyle. The group allegedly tried to kill the New York Magazine story.

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A BLM board member claims that the mansion does not serve as anyone’s personal residence and the space will be for housing and studios.

An expert in the non-profit sector told New York Magazine that the size of the purchase could expose BLM to more criticism about its financial transparency.

“That’s a very legitimate critique,” Candid co-founder Jacob Harold said. “It’s not a critique that says what you’re doing is illegal or even unethical; it might just be strategic. Why aren’t you spending it on policy or, you know, other strategies that an organization might take to address the core issues around Black Lives Matter?”
 
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pgs

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Black Lives Matter used $6M in donations for California mansion: Report
A BLM board member claims that the mansion does not serve as anyone's personal residence and the space will be for housing and studios.

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 05, 2022 • 22 hours ago • 2 minute read • 36 Comments
Patrisse Cullors, Black Lives Matter co-founder, participates in the "Finding Justice" panel during the BET presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington in Pasadena, Calif. Feb. 11, 2019,
Patrisse Cullors, Black Lives Matter co-founder, participates in the "Finding Justice" panel during the BET presentation at the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour at The Langham Huntington in Pasadena, Calif. Feb. 11, 2019, PHOTO BY WILLY SANJUAN /Invision/AP
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Social justice firebrands Black Lives Matter allegedly used $6 million in donations to buy a posh California mansion, New York Magazine reports.

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According to the magazine, three of the movement’s leading lights — Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Melina Abdullah — recorded a video last June at the “secretly bought” home.

They were noting the first anniversary of George Floyd’s murder.

Earlier, the New York Post reported that Cullors bought four premium homes for $3.2 million. She told pals after the revelations that she was in “survival mode.”

“It’s because we’re powerful, because we are winning,” Cullors said of what she slammed as right-wing media attacks. “It’s because we are threatening the establishment, we’re threatening white supremacy.”

The most recent purchase by the posh protesters is reportedly a 6,500-square-foot palace with seven bedrooms and bathrooms and amenities like a pool and parking for more than 20 cars.

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New York Magazine said the mansion was purchased in October 2020. Funds for the manse were allegedly donated to the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation (BLMGNF).

A man named Dyane Pascall allegedly is the one who paid for the home two weeks after BLMGNF received $66.5 million from its fiscal sponsor earlier that month. He is the financial manager for Janaya and Patrisse Consulting — an LLC operated by Cullors and her spouse, Janaya Khan, the mag reported.

But within a week, the ownership was transferred to an opaque Delaware company concealing the purchaser.

BLM co-founder Cullors resigned from the group last May after the New York Post report on the inner circle’s high-flying lifestyle. The group allegedly tried to kill the New York Magazine story.

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A BLM board member claims that the mansion does not serve as anyone’s personal residence and the space will be for housing and studios.

An expert in the non-profit sector told New York Magazine that the size of the purchase could expose BLM to more criticism about its financial transparency.

“That’s a very legitimate critique,” Candid co-founder Jacob Harold said. “It’s not a critique that says what you’re doing is illegal or even unethical; it might just be strategic. Why aren’t you spending it on policy or, you know, other strategies that an organization might take to address the core issues around Black Lives Matter?”
More pigs being pigs , they are everywhere .
 

spaminator

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Minnesota prosecutor says no charges in police raid that killed Amir Locke
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Brendan O'Brien and Tyler Clifford
Publishing date:Apr 06, 2022 • 17 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
A demonstrator holds a photo of Amir Locke during a rally in protest of his killing, outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis, Minn. Feb. 5, 2022.
A demonstrator holds a photo of Amir Locke during a rally in protest of his killing, outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis, Minn. Feb. 5, 2022. PHOTO BY KEREM YUCEL /AFP via Getty Images
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A Minneapolis police officer will not face criminal charges for fatally shooting a 22-year-old Black man during a no-knock raid on an apartment in February, state and local prosecutors said on Wednesday.

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Even though the dead man, Amir Locke, was a victim, there was insufficient evidence to bring charges against Mark Hanneman, the member of the Minneapolis SWAT team who fired the shot, according to a statement from Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison and Hennepin County Attorney Michael Freeman.

The state also lacked evidence to prove criminal wrongdoing by any of the officers involved in the planning and execution of the Feb. 2 raid, it said.

The killing, one in a nationwide string of incidents that has prompted outrage over law enforcement’s treatment of racial minorities, highlighted the potential for violent interactions when no-knock warrants are issued.

Ellison, a former U.S. congressman, called on lawmakers at the local and national levels to consider whether to ban no-knock warrants because of the inherent risks.

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Under current law and precedent, “it would be unethical for us to file charges in a case in which we know that we will not be able to prevail because the law does not support the charges,” he said at a media briefing to discuss the decision.

Locke’s shooting revived community calls for a ban on no-knock warrants, prompting Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey to place a moratorium on the practice in February. Strict limits on the practice are set to go into effect this week, local media reported.

In the Locke case, a judge approved the warrant on the apartment as part of an investigation into a previous fatal shooting in neighboring St. Paul, saying it was necessary to protect officers searching the property.

Locke, who was sleeping on a couch when police entered, was not a suspect in the crime under investigation or named in the warrant.

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In the days after Locke’s killing, police released video footage of the raid. Peaceful protests in downtown Minneapolis have drawn hundreds of demonstrators to demand justice and a ban on no-knock warrants.

The incident followed two other police killings of Black men in the Minneapolis area – George Floyd in 2020 and Daunte Wright in 2021 – that commanded national attention and amplified calls for reforms against police brutality and treatment of minorities.

The Locke case also prompted comparisons with the 2020 killing of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman who police fatally shot during a no-knock raid on her Louisville, Kentucky, apartment.

One of the officers involved in the Taylor incident was acquitted by a jury on charges of endangering her neighbors with gunfire. The verdict in March cleared law enforcement of all criminal liability in a case that rocked the United States in 2020.
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