Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

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CRIME HUNTER: Was Black Panther the victim in 1969 cold case?
He was found stuffed in a barrel, shot nine times with his legs sawed off

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Mar 20, 2021 • 10 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Days of rage. Huey P. Newton of the Black Panther Party. Cleveland cops think a 1969 cold case could be connected to the radical group.
Days of rage. Huey P. Newton of the Black Panther Party. Cleveland cops think a 1969 cold case could be connected to the radical group.
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During the racial and civil unrest of 1960’s America, not many people were neutral about the Black Panther Party.

Established in Oakland in 1966, the Panthers believed in “open carry” and kept watch on an epidemic of police brutality in American cities.


Beloved by white champagne socialists, the movement was characterized by its critics as exhibiting “defiant posturing over substance.”

Eventually the movement imploded from internal conflicts, a bloody fratricide and external persecution.

But the former radicals came up again this week as part of a Cleveland cold case homicide investigation detectives believe has ties to the Panthers.

This unidentified John Doe was shot nine times in Cleveland in 1969.
This unidentified John Doe was shot nine times in Cleveland in 1969. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /CLEVELAND PD
The Mistake on the Lake was no different from other American inner cities in the tumultuous 1960’s: Unrest was in the air, particularly in the black neighbourhoods on Cleveland’s east side.

On Aug. 29, 1969, a property owner dumped his teenage son off at a lot to tidy things up. One of the bits of junk lying around was a barrel the boy thought he’d use to burn trash.

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Instead, he found a body inside.

The young black male had been shot nine times and his legs had been sawed off. Cops said the victim had been covered in some sort of caustic fluid. A coroner noted he had suffered blunt force trauma.

The straw that broke the camel’s back in Detroit was cops breaking up a party for two soldiers returning from the war in Vietnam. The scene was repeated again and again across the U.S.
The straw that broke the camel’s back in Detroit was cops breaking up a party for two soldiers returning from the war in Vietnam. The scene was repeated again and again across the U.S. PHOTO BY NO CREDIT /THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cleveland investigators began the grim task of trying to identify their homicide victim but despite a number of intriguing clues, the case went nowhere.

The dead man was wearing a Waltham wristwatch and a gray metal ring with a blue stone on his fourth finger. He had a tattoo with the name “Sally” etched on the inside of his left forearm and it was discovered he had a medical condition that made his eyes bulge.

Detectives always believed the murder victim had a connection to Cleveland’s Black Panther Party.


Agents from the FBI’s Cleveland field office — who had informants inside the Panthers — were kept abreast of the group’s comings and goings. At least one source told them the dead man had a connection. Who he was, nobody knew.

As for his murder, it had all the earmarks of an organized, professional rubout.

But “Sally” was never found and for almost 52 years, the Cleveland John Doe has remained unidentified.

Enter The Porchlight Project, a non-profit that uses donations to help law enforcement solve cold cases through DNA and other forensic sciences.

American soldiers advance through a rice paddy during the Vietnam War. The war played a leading role in some of the unrest at home.
American soldiers advance through a rice paddy during the Vietnam War. The war played a leading role in some of the unrest at home.
“This is a piece of Cleveland history that remains untold,” said founder James Renner. “We’re excited to provide the means to finally give a name to this man so that we can learn how he came to be here and who may have wanted him dead.”

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The Porchlight Project is fully funding Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing and family records research by Othram Inc., with the hope of generating leads that could identify the victim.

“At the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner’s Office, we never give up hope that we may provide closure to families and bring criminals to justice even years after a death has occurred,” Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Gilson told WKYC.

He added: “It would also be uniquely satisfying to me to see this case through to completion as the late Dr. Hirsch, the original coroner, was my teacher in forensic pathology.”

With cold cases, the past comes alive. This time it’s the tense summer of 1969 and the gruesome murder of a young man left nameless by time.
 

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1 in 2 people of colour experienced online racism in Canada: Survey
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Laura Dhillon Kane
Publishing date:Mar 21, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 4 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
In this file photo, hundreds of people participated in the Chatham-Kent Supports: Black Lives Matter march held June 5, 2020 in Chatham, Ont.
In this file photo, hundreds of people participated in the Chatham-Kent Supports: Black Lives Matter march held June 5, 2020 in Chatham, Ont. PHOTO BY ELLWOOD SHREVE/CHATHAM DAILY NEWS /Postmedia Network
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VANCOUVER — Noor Fadel says most people assume that the night she was attacked by a racist man on a SkyTrain in Vancouver in 2017 was the worst night of her life.

In fact, the nights that followed were even more harrowing, as her social-media post about the assault went viral and she received a torrent of hateful and threatening messages.


“People think that hiding behind a screen and saying something won’t have an impact. It does. It has a huge impact on people,” she said.

“That one message that you may think could not hurt someone, it’s just a simple message, it can actually be the message to ruin someone’s entire day, if not someone’s life.”

Fadel, 22, is sharing her story in support of a campaign launched by the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and YWCA Canada to highlight the consequences of social-media hate.

The #BlockHate campaign coincides with a separate, unrelated survey by the Association for Canadian Studies, which sheds new light on racism in Canada both online and offline.

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To mark the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on Sunday, the association commissioned Leger Marketing to ask Canadians about their views on racism.

The survey found that seven in 10 respondents are worried about the degree of racism in the country, a concern held by three in four participating women and people between 18 and 34.

One in two survey participants who identify as visible minorities have felt attacked by hateful comments on social media, and nearly six in 10 said they have witnessed hatred online.

Those who were exposed to hateful internet comments were more likely to be worried about racism, said association president Jack Jedwab.

“It’s not so much the violent incidents that we’ve seen over the past year, which have attracted considerable media attention, that are fuelling people’s concerns about racism,” he said.

“It’s also the extent to which people are witnessing this phenomenon expand in social media.”


The survey also suggested that one in three Canadians admit to holding a negative view of Muslims, one in five have a negative view of Indigenous people and one in seven state a negative view of Chinese people, Jews or immigrants.

People who have never met any members of those groups are more likely to think negatively of them, suggesting that social media is playing a role once again, said Jedwab.

“They get information from social media about these groups … and the outcome, unfortunately, is that they hold negative or prejudicial views.”

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The survey of 1,514 Canadians was conducted online between March 12 and 14 using web panels. The polling industry’s professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error as they are not a random sample and therefore are not necessarily representative of the whole population.

It also suggested Atlantic Canadians and Ontarians are most worried about the degree of racism in Canada, and that Canadians are more concerned about racism in the country and province than in their neighbourhoods.

The findings ring true for Fadel, who said she encountered racism many times in Vancouver before the incident on the SkyTrain in December 2017, when she was 18.

She said a man approached her and yelled that he was going to kill her and all Muslims before grabbing her head and forcing it toward his crotch.

He then struck her across the face, prompting another transit rider to push him off her.

Pierre Belzan, 46, received a suspended sentence and two years probation in 2018 after pleading guilty to assault and threatening to cause death or bodily harm.

Fadel said she took to social media after the incident because she was sick of hearing that racism in Canada doesn’t exist. While her Facebook post received thousands of supportive comments, the hateful ones stood out to her the most.

The messages included comments telling the Canadian-born woman to “go back to her country,” calling her sexist and racist slurs, accusing her of lying and threatening to kill her.

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She said she only realized while isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic that she is still traumatized by the messages, years later, and she is still working on healing.

The #BlockHate campaign launches Monday and aims to encourage regulation to minimize the volume and frequency at which online hate speech and racism is spread.

Online hate is often a precursor to violent, in-person attacks against marginalized people, noted Mohammed Hashim, director of the Canadian Foundation for Race Relations.

People with hateful views will likely always exist, but social media has handed them the biggest microphone they’ve ever had, Hashim said.

“What we’re looking to do is to constrict that. We understand that it’s going to exist, but let it remain in the fringes of society,” he said.

Regulations must ensure that hateful posts can be taken down quickly to decelerate their spread, and include deterrents so posters experience consequences, he said.

Hashim also pointed out that logging off is not an option for victims of online attacks now that everyone’s personal and professional lives are increasingly virtual, especially during COVID-19.

“If we don’t deal with this now, this is only going to get worse,” he said.

“If we leave it the way it is, I want people to think about: what is the world that we’re creating for the next generation?”
 

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Jacob Blake sues cop who shot, paralyzed him last year
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 26, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
In this social network video released on by his lawyer Ben Crump, Jacob Blake delivers a message from a hospital bed in Kenosha, Wisconsin on September 5, 2020.
In this social network video released on by his lawyer Ben Crump, Jacob Blake delivers a message from a hospital bed in Kenosha, Wisconsin on September 5, 2020. PHOTO BY @ATTORNEYCRUMP TWITTER ACCOUNT /AFP via Getty Images
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Jacob Blake Jr., the Black man from Kenosha, Wisconsin who was shot by a police officer last year and was left paralyzed from the waist down, has sued the cop who fired at him in a federal court.

Blake was shot several times in the back in the presence of his young children in August, sparking several days of deadly protests against police brutality and racism in his hometown and across the country.


Earlier this year, Wisconsin prosecutors cleared Rusten Sheskey, the officer involved in the shooting, saying he acted in self-defence.

Blake’s latest 19-page lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin sought an unspecified amount in compensation for the injuries he suffered, and “a substantial sum” in punitive damages.


His lawyers also demanded to be paid for costs, legal fees, “and such other relief as is just and equitable.”

Blake’s lawyers did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.

Protests erupted last summer after a viral cellphone video showed Blake walking around the front of his car with Sheskey following and opening fire after Blake opened the door.

But investigators said the video was incomplete and failed to show that Blake was armed with a knife and had resisted arrest.
 

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Apology in the works for descendants of Canada's only all-Black battalion: Sajjan
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Mar 28, 2021 • 22 minutes ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Officers and men of the Afro-Canadian unit at Windsor. These men are part of the No. 2 Construction Battalion.
Officers and men of the Afro-Canadian unit at Windsor. These men are part of the No. 2 Construction Battalion. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /Postmedia Network
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HALIFAX — Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan paid tribute Sunday to Canada’s only all-Black unit to serve during the First World War, saying the 600 members of No. 2 Construction Battalion and their descendants are owed an apology for the racism they faced despite their willingness to serve.

Sajjan told a virtual event plans are in the works for a formal apology from Ottawa, which will highlight the fact that hundreds of Black men in Canada were turned away when they volunteered to fight overseas in 1914.


“They stepped forward and volunteered for our country, only to be denied because of the colour of their skin — denied to fight in a so-called ‘white-man’s war,”’ Sajjan said in a brief speech from British Columbia.

“We know there are painful parts of our history, injustices that contradict the values of our nation. These are parts of our history we must never forget … These are the wrongs that we must acknowledge and learn from.”

After two years of protests, the Canadian military was granted approval in 1916 to establish a segregated, non-combat battalion that would be tasked with building roads, railways and forestry operations as part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

“Today, we are deeply grateful for their bravery and resilience in the face of hate and adversity,” Sajjan said. “This was critical work that was often overlooked in our history books.”


Established July 5, 1916, in Pictou, N.S., the battalion was the last segregated unit in the Canadian military.

Recruitment took place across the country. More than 300 of those who enlisted were from Nova Scotia. Others joined from New Brunswick, Ontario, the West and the United States.

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Douglas Ruck, co-chairman of the Black Battalion Historical Marker Society, said the newly enlisted men had already seen their share of fighting.

“They have fought and struggled for close to two years for the right to (fight for Canada),” he said. “They fought and struggled against institutionalized racism, against bigotry and prejudice.”

Ruck said the battalion’s legacy would have been forgotten, were is not for his father, the late Nova Scotia Sen. Calvin Ruck, who explored the history of the unit in his book “The Black Battalion 1916—1920: Canada’s Best-Kept Military Secret.”

In the spring of 1917, the battalion was deployed to Seaford in southern England, and was later sent to Lajoux, France, where it worked in the foothills of the French Alps.

Commanded by Lt.-Col. Daniel Sutherland, a native of River John, N.S., all the unit’s 19 officers were white, except one. The unit’s chaplain, Capt. William A. White, held the rank of honorary captain, making him the only Black commissioned officer in the Canadian military at that time.

For the most part, the unit supported three major forestry operations in conjunction with Canadian Forestry Corps. Their duties included felling trees, operating lumber mills and maintaining roads, vehicles and railway equipment. At the mills, they produced railway ties, as well as boards and stakes for use in the trenches.

At one point, the unit helped build a narrow-gauge railway from the timber lots to the mills in Lajoux.

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Nova Scotia Premier Iain Rankin said battalion members were responsible for important work that aided in the war effort.

“It is a great inspiration because their commitment came in the face of widespread institutional, anti-Black racism,” Rankin said. “Deep prejudice in Canadian society made it difficult for Black men who wished to fight for Canada.”

In September 1917, the battalion was ordered to move closer to the front lines in northeast France, where the unit continued working in forestry and roadwork operations.

Only a few of its members would see combat, mainly because the battalion was repeatedly told its help wasn’t wanted on the front lines.

Members of the unit were shipped home in 1918 and the battalion was disbanded in 1920.
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Amazon removes shocking 'Cartoon Chimpanzee' dolls
Author of the article:Bryan Passifiume
Publishing date:Mar 30, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • 16 Comments
Dolls that were available for sale on Amazon Canada marketed as Cartoon Chimpanzee Plush Toy Large Funny Couple.
Dolls that were available for sale on Amazon Canada marketed as Cartoon Chimpanzee Plush Toy Large Funny Couple. Amazon Canada
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Racist dolls have been pulled from Amazon Canada after questions were raised by the Sun.

The “Cartoon Chimpanzee Plush Toy Large Funny Couple” stuffed dolls resemble golliwog caricatures that were popular in the late 1800s in everything from children’s books and toys to advertising and entertainment.

Tim Hortons enters 'Hall of Shame' for chemical use
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Both male and female versions of the dolls were being sold in several sizes.

The dolls were available for sale on Amazon.ca on Monday evening in six separate listings priced between $48.50 and $111.44 but were unavailable Tuesday morning.

Ads for dolls on Amazon Canada marketed as Cartoon Chimpanzee Plush Toy Large Funny Couple. The items have since been removed.
Ads for dolls on Amazon Canada marketed as Cartoon Chimpanzee Plush Toy Large Funny Couple. The items have since been removed. Amazon.ca
The item’s description described the dolls as “cute plush toys” that are a “perfect gift for loved ones, friends, family, children’s birthdays, New Year gifts and holidays.”

The toy also promised to “make your home full of love and warmth.”

Broader Internet searches found the doll available from various wholesalers based in mainland China, including AliExpress.

Asked for comment by the Sun, an Amazon Canada spokesperson said Tuesday the dolls were no longer for sale.

“All sellers must follow our selling guidelines and those who do not will be subject to action including potential removal of their account,” the statement said.

bpassifiume@postmedia.com

On Twitter: @bryanpassifiume
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Report claim that Britain is model for racial equality sparks backlash
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Michael Holden and Elizabeth Piper
Publishing date:Mar 31, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • 5 Comments
A man and a woman hold hands aloft in Hyde Park during a "Black Lives Matter" protest following the death of George Floyd who died in police custody in Minneapolis, London, Britain, June 3, 2020.
A man and a woman hold hands aloft in Hyde Park during a "Black Lives Matter" protest following the death of George Floyd who died in police custody in Minneapolis, London, Britain, June 3, 2020. PHOTO BY DYLAN MARTINEZ /REUTERS
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LONDON — Britain should be seen as a “model for other white-majority countries” but more still needs to be done, a review into race inequality said on Wednesday, a conclusion that provoked fury from critics who branded it a “whitewash.”

The report by the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities was ordered by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government after widespread Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests last summer, triggered by the death of George Floyd in police custody in the United States.


“Put simply we no longer see a Britain where the system is deliberately rigged against ethnic minorities,” Tony Sewell, the commission’s chairman, said in a foreword to the report.

“The impediments and disparities do exist, they are varied, and ironically very few of them are directly to do with racism. Too often ‘racism’ is the catch-all explanation, and can be simply implicitly accepted rather than explicitly examined.”

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The BLM movement, which saw tens of thousands of Britons join demonstrations, caused Britain, like other Western countries, to look more closely at race relations and its colonial past, with campaigners demanding action to end structural bias.

At the time, protest organizers said Johnson’s choices for the commission did not represent their views and should be replaced because those appointed, like Sewell, a Black educational consultant, did not believe that Britain had a problem with institutional racism.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson hailed “this important piece of work” which he said was a detailed, data-led examination of inequality and the Conservative government would now consider its 24 recommendations.

“The entirety of government remains fully committed to building a fairer Britain and taking the action needed to address disparities wherever they exist,” he said.


“RACIAL INEQUALITY”

However, opposition Labour leader Keir Starmer said he was disappointed by the report, while campaigners called it a whitewash instigated to gloss over deep-rooted problems, such as why Black people were nine times more likely to be stopped and searched by police.

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“Another total whitewash. While the Tories (Conservatives) pat themselves on the back, their report just sets back the clock on ending racial inequality even further,” Labour lawmaker Bell Ribeiro-Addy said on Twitter. “Ignoring the deep racial disparities afflicting people across UK society gets us nowhere.”

Halima Begum, head of the Runnymede Trust race equality think tank told BBC television: “All it is is a whitewash and a script that has been written to 10 Downing Street.”

The report said overt and outright racism did persist, particularly online, and Britain was not yet a “post-racial society” of equal opportunity.

But it concluded geography, family influence, socio-economic background, culture and religion were more significant factors on life chances than the existence of racism.

It highlighted educational attainment by ethnic minority groups as demonstrating that institutional racism was not to blame for disparities, pointing out that Black Africans performed better than those from Black Caribbean as well as white backgrounds.

The country had come a long way in 50 years and “the success of much of the ethnic minority population in education and, to a lesser extent, the economy, should be regarded as a model for other white-majority countries,” the commission said.

Its recommendations included ending the use of the BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) acronym because of the differences in the experiences of minorities, and changes to policing and the criminal justice system.
 

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Seven Texas officers fired after custody death of Black man
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Apr 02, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Marvin Scott.
Marvin Scott. PHOTO BY SCREENSHOT /GoFundMe
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A Texas sheriff fired on Thursday seven officers who had been put on administrative leave after the custody death of a Black man, Marvin D. Scott III, Collin County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement .

The dismissal of the officers in Texas comes at time when the eyes of the United States are locked on Minneapolis, where former policeman Derek Chauvin is on trial for the murder of a 46-year-old Black man, George Floyd, whose death last May set off protests across the country, and around the world, against racial injustice and police brutality toward Black people.


Scott, 26, was acting in an erratic manner when he was arrested after a March 14 disturbance at an outlet mall, and police were concerned for his safety because of the possible ingestion of drugs, the New York Times reported, citing authorities.


He was held on a marijuana possession charge, though he had less than two ounces, which is a misdemeanour, Allen, Texas, Police Department said.

Scott died later that night after having been restrained and pepper-sprayed following his handover to the county jail, the New York Times reported, adding that a spit hood had been placed over his head.

“Evidence I have seen confirms that these detention officers violated well-established sheriff’s office policies and procedures,” Jim Skinner, the sheriff of Collin County, said.

He added that an eighth officer had resigned while under investigation.
 

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For BLM leaders the movement is very profitable, really showing their Marxism now

Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors Lands Topanga Canyon Compound

By Mark David
April 7, 2021 1:56 pm PT

A secluded mini-compound tucked into L.A.’s rustic and semi-remote Topanga Canyon was recently sold for a tad more than $1.4 million to a corporate entity that public records show is controlled by Patrisse Khan-Cullors, 37-year-old social justice visionary and co-founder of the galvanizing and, for some, controversial Black Lives Matter movement.

Kahn-Cullors, a UCLA and USC graduate married about five years ago to social activist (and amateur boxer) Janaya Khan, co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto, created the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag in 2013 in response to George Zimmerman’s acquittal in the 2012 shooting of Trayvon Martin. Since then, the largely decentralized movement has been at the influential forefront on issues of police brutality and racially motivated violence against Black people, particularly in the wake of George Floyd’s killing last summer that sparked massive protests across the United States and around the globe. Kahn-Cullors’ published “When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir” in 2018.



A winding 15 minute drive from The Commons at Calabasas and a slightly longer and somewat less serpentine drive from Malibu’s Getty Villa, the pint-sized compound spans about one-quarter of an acre. The property’s not-quite 2,400 square feet is divided between the a three-bedroom and two-bath main house and a separate one-bed/one-bath apartment capable of hosting guests long term with a private entry and a living room with kitchenette.

Interior spaces feature bamboo floors and, in the spacious open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen, vaulted ceilings clad in knotty pine. A whitewashed raised hearth brick fireplace anchors the living room and numerous skylights baths the cavernous space with natural light.

The two guest bedrooms and hall bathroom are fairly ordinary, as is the simple and up-to-date though not especially high-end kitchen, while the primary bedroom offers a vaulted and wood-clad ceiling plus a small sitting area with glass sliders to the backyard.

An un-landscaped dust bowl with little charm besides the natural beauty of the trees and rugged mountains that envelope the property, the backyard offers little more than a covered patio for alfresco dining, a small deck and a tiny freestanding cabin best suited as a home office, meditation retreat or art studio.

The listing was managed by Stefanie Becker at Coldwell Banker Realty and the buyer by Nina Kurtz at Compass.
 
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Report: Marxist Black Lives Matter Co-founder Bought Four Homes since 2016


Patrisse Khan-Cullors, one of the co-founders of the Black Lives Matter movement and a “trained Marxist,” is reported to have bought four homes over the past several years, as her activist profile grew and protests raged around the country.

Last week, real estate website Dirt.com reported that the “37-year-old social justice visionary” Khan-Cullors had bought a $1.4 million compound in Topanga, a remote Los Angeles neighborhood nestled deep in the Santa Monica mountains.

In L.A. terms, $1.4 million is not necessarily extravagant, though the activist took criticism for spending what would be a fortune in most other real estate markets, and for buying in a largely white neighborhood after urging people to “buy black.”

However, it turns out that Khan-Cullors also owns a house in the predominantly black neighborhood of Inglewood — among several other homes. The New York Post reported Saturday that she bought a $510,000 home there in 2016, which is worth about $800,000 today. She also bought a $590,000 home in South Los Angeles that is worth $720,000 today, and bought a ranch in rural Georgia for $415,000 last year, “featuring a private airplane hangar with a studio apartment above it.”

The Post added that Khan-Cullors and spouse Janaya Khan “also eyed property in the Bahamas at an ultra-exclusive resort where Justin Timberlake and Tiger Woods both have homes” called the Albany last year, with the price not disclosed.

Khan-Cullors declared in 2015 that she and the other Black Lives Matter co-founders were “trained Marxists” who are ” super-versed” on “ideological theories.” Last year, as Breitbart News noted, the radical activist signed a content production deal with Warner Bros. Television Group.

The news of Khan-Cullors’s real estate purchases prompted some activists called for a financial investigation of the Black Lives Matter movement. Khan-Cullors is hardly the first to cash in. Tamika Mallory, notorious for her support of the antisemite Louis Farrakhan, has scored product endorsements.

Nor would Khan-Cullors be the first Marxist to succeed in the real estate market with multiple homes. In 2014, Breitbart News reported on local landlords in Santa Monica, California, who are avowed supporters of the Castro regime in Cuba.
 
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Inside BLM co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors’ million-dollar real-estate buying binge

By Isabel Vincent
April 10, 2021 | 7:23pm | Updated



Canadian connection



Patrisse Khan-Cullors’ spouse and BLM Canada co-founder Janaya Khan.

Some fellow activists were taken aback by the real estate revelations.

Hawk Newsome, the head of Black Lives Matter Greater New York City, called for “an independent investigation” to find out how the global network spends its money.

“If you go around calling yourself a socialist, you have to ask how much of her own personal money is going to charitable causes,” he said. “It’s really sad because it makes people doubt the validity of the movement and overlook the fact that it’s the people that carry this movement.”
 
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Daunte Wright: Protesters Clash With Police Near Minneapolis After Deadly Officer-Involved Shooting

By T. Grant Benson April 12, 2021

MINNEAPOLIS — Unrest was unfolding Sunday night on the streets of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota following a deadly police involved shooting.

Around 2:00 p.m. local time, cops initiated a traffic stop in the 6300 block of Orchard Avenue (near Minneapolis). Police say the driver was wanted on an ‘outstanding warrant’ and tried to drive away as officers placed him under arrest. That’s when he was fatally shot.

The mother of the driver who was killed, Katie Wright, identified her son as 20-year-old Daunte Wright. She told local media that Daunte’s girlfriend was in the car at the time of the shooting.

“He called me at about 1:40, said he was getting pulled over by the police,” the woman said. “He said they pulled him over because he had air fresheners hanging from his rearview mirror.”


“I heard scuffling, and I heard the police officers say, ‘Daunte, don’t run,’ and then the other officer said, ‘Put the phone down’ and hung it up,” the distraught mother said. “Like a minute later, I called and his girlfriend answered — she was the passenger — and said that he’d been shot, and she put it on the driver’s side and my son was laying there lifeless.”....More

 

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DISTURBING VIDEO: Army lieutenant sues police for pepper spraying, threatening him during stop​

By T. Grant Benson April 11, 2021


Norfolk, Virginia — Two Virginia police officers have been sued for allegedly drawing their guns on a uniformed Army officer during a traffic stop and spraying him with a substance. U.S. Army Lt. Caron Nazario was driving Dec. 5, 2020, in his newly purchased Chevrolet Tahoe when two Windsor police officers, Joe Gutierrez and Daniel Crocker pulled over Nazario, while he was dressed in uniform, according to the lawsuit filed April 2. The officers’ body camera footage shows both exiting their patrol cars with guns drawn, while 2nd Lt.

Nazario is asking for at least $1 million in damages and for the court to rule that the two officers violated his rights, including rights under the Fourth Amendment.

An officer said Nazario’s SUV had tinted windows, didn’t have a rear license plate and had been “eluding police.” Nazario’s attorney says his client was trying to stop in a well-lit area.....More
 
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