Bill’s C-10 & C-11. If we aren’t talking about it already, shouldn’t we be?

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
As authoritarian regimes are expanding all around the world, notes Freedom House, Canada and other western nations seem to be tilting in that awful direction. Some Canadians may fear the future of democracy under a new Donald Trump administration in the United States, but they would do well to look closer to home.

Indeed, even as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issues statements denouncing Russia and China, his regime is now contemplating an online harms law, Bill C-63, which would permit judges to impose house arrest on those who they fear might commit a hate crime in the future. In the case of the most heinous speech, like advocating for genocide, this law would allow lifetime imprisonment. Lighter sentences or simple house arrest could be applied to anything that censors regard as hate speech, which could include such things as “misgendering” people or criticizing any aspect of Islam.
The write up at the above link isn’t short, but it is interesting. The link below is another view from the outside looking in:
What makes this worse is that this all comes after a period in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been perfectly happy to call decent, ordinary Canadians Nazis. To use measures like the de-banking of his critics in moves that have horrified most of the other democracies in the West.

When a bank in my country of birth — Britain — was recently found to have de-banked a politician (Nigel Farage) for what turned out to be political reasons not only did the head of the bank resign, but politicians in Britain from across the political system condemned the bank. Such moves are unlikely to be taken by another bank in Britain again. But in Canada it seems to be perfectly acceptable, because at any time the Canadian prime minister and deputy prime minister can claim that their critics are homophobes, xenophobes, racists, Nazis, misogynists and all of the rest, etc….
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
As authoritarian regimes are expanding all around the world, notes Freedom House, Canada and other western nations seem to be tilting in that awful direction. Some Canadians may fear the future of democracy under a new Donald Trump administration in the United States, but they would do well to look closer to home.

Indeed, even as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issues statements denouncing Russia and China, his regime is now contemplating an online harms law, Bill C-63, which would permit judges to impose house arrest on those who they fear might commit a hate crime in the future. In the case of the most heinous speech, like advocating for genocide, this law would allow lifetime imprisonment. Lighter sentences or simple house arrest could be applied to anything that censors regard as hate speech, which could include such things as “misgendering” people or criticizing any aspect of Islam.
The write up at the above link isn’t short, but it is interesting. The link below is another view from the outside looking in:
What makes this worse is that this all comes after a period in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been perfectly happy to call decent, ordinary Canadians Nazis. To use measures like the de-banking of his critics in moves that have horrified most of the other democracies in the West.

When a bank in my country of birth — Britain — was recently found to have de-banked a politician (Nigel Farage) for what turned out to be political reasons not only did the head of the bank resign, but politicians in Britain from across the political system condemned the bank. Such moves are unlikely to be taken by another bank in Britain again. But in Canada it seems to be perfectly acceptable, because at any time the Canadian prime minister and deputy prime minister can claim that their critics are homophobes, xenophobes, racists, Nazis, misogynists and all of the rest, etc….
Dangerous when words are now labeled violence.

One persons violent words could be anothers lullaby. Who decides? The crybaby?
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Dangerous when words are now labeled violence.

One persons violent words could be anothers lullaby. Who decides? The crybaby?
Remember , sticks and stones will break my bones , but words will never hurt me ?
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
That’s an example though. More concerning is that layered Bill’s C-63 on top of C-18 (I believe) on top of C-11 (formally known as C-10) where as the liberal minority Canadian government wishes to police the World Wide Web Internet…Which will, if acknowledged at all, just block content or access to Canada, as a fix towards compliance with the above layered goat rodeo.

This going hand-in-hand with draconian heavy handedness towards its own citizens (Canadians) creating a new bureaucracy and empowering Canadian human rights tribunals and the CRTC towards policing the global Internet.
Anywho….today is a banner day for Lib/NDP etc…
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If we’re going to discriminate against our largest (& only physically connected) trade partner…might as well come into effect July 4th. Who’s potentially the next US octogenarian president going to be again? Trudeau’s buddy….whats his name again?

The federal government has enacted a controversial digital services tax that will bring in billions of dollars while threatening Canada's trading relationships by taxing the revenue international firms earn in Canada….& after a 10 month overlap between Trudeau/Singh & that other dude (blond mop, orange skin, what’s his name again? Oompa Loompa or something?).

The Liberal government proposed the tax in its 2019 election platform. It later agreed to delay implementing the measure until the end of 2023 in the hopes it could reach a deal with other OECD countries on how multinational digital companies should be taxed.

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters in Milton, Ont. on Thursday that "Canada's preference is, and has always been, a multilateral solution."

"It’s simply not reasonable, not fair, for Canada to indefinitely put our own measures on hold," she said. "A number of other countries have a DST in place right now, and they have had a DST in place for a number of years with no retaliation [from the U.S.]."

Digital firms that have global annual income of at least $1.1 billion will see annual revenues in Canada over $20 million taxed at a rate of three per cent. The first year of the tax includes revenue earned since Jan. 1, 2022.

…& whom will eat this tax? Canadian content providers &/or subscription holders to these services? Wouldn’t that just make things more expensive for Canadians in general on top of pissing off our closest trade partner? Would that matter to a Liberal government?

The Liberal government's decision to impose the tax before an international agreement could be reached with other OECD countries has raised concerns about “possible” negative impacts.

U.S. Ambassador to Canada David Cohen issued a media statement Thursday calling the tax "discriminatory."

"[The United States Trade Representative] has noted its concern with Canada's digital services tax and is assessing, and is open to using, all available tools that could result in meaningful progress toward addressing unilateral, discriminatory [digital services taxes]," Cohen said in the statement.

As soon as the legislation enabling the tax became law, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the American Chamber of Commerce in Canada issued a statement strongly objecting to the measure, which they say will raise prices for everyone.

They said a digital services tax would disproportionately hit U.S. companies, undermine digital exports to Canada and violate Canada's obligations under the U.S.-Canada-Mexico free trade agreement and the World Trade Organization.

"At this very sensitive time in the Canada–U.S. trade relationship, we urge the Government of Canada to reconsider this unilateral and discriminatory new levy," the statement said.

Last month, the U.S. Computer and Communications Industry Association, which represents big tech companies such as Amazon, Apple and Uber, wrote to U.S. President Joe Biden asking his administration to initiate formal dispute settlement procedures under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Happy July 4th to our American Friends and Neighbours!!!
The Canadian Chamber of Commerce told CBC News Thursday that "a retroactive discriminatory digital services tax" will harm Canada's relationship with the U.S. and raise the cost of living in Canada.

"The government should reverse its unilateral decision that is out of step with our allies, and instead work with our trading partners on an international solution that would better serve Canadians," Robin Guy, the chamber's vice president of government relations, told CBC News.

On June 28, Ontario Finance Minister Peter Bethlenfalvy wrote to Freeland asking that the tax's implementation be paused because it’s just such an awesome idea? Nope, ‘cuz “We must do this carefully and not in a way that will impose unnecessary taxes on people and businesses or risk isolating Canada from the U.S. marketplace." Oh, well, that too I guess.