April Fools!! Here's your Carbon Tax F#ckers!!!

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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The closer you look at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s climate change plan, the more obvious it becomes that the emperor has no clothes and that, as the saying goes, there’s no there there.

The most glaring deficiency is that there’s no credible link between the $100 billion the Trudeau government says it’s spending on climate change and actually achieving specific targets on an annual basis to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

That reduces Trudeau’s national carbon pricing system to a sin tax.

It makes Canadians, already hard hit by soaring inflation, pay for the “sin” of using fossil fuel energy to heat their homes, drive their cars and purchase almost all goods and services, since almost all goods and services are created using fossil fuel energy.

In place of a coherent strategy there is a never-ending word salad coming from Trudeau and his present and past environment ministers, assuring us their government, having failed to meet its 2020 emissions target, is now on track to meet its 2030 and 2050 targets.

This is ludicrous.

First, the government is relying on technologies to achieve these targets — culminating, it claims, with “net zero” emissions in 2050 — that either don’t exist yet or that do exist but aren’t ready for prime time when it comes to powering a modern, industrialized, big, cold, sparsely-populated, northern country like Canada.

Second, any competent project manager knows that if you failed to meet your 2020 target, your assurances you’re going to hit your 2030 and 2050 targets aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on.

When federal environment commissioner Jerry DeMarco recently audited Trudeau’s so-called “Just Transition” plan to help Canadian workers and their families transition from the fossil fuel energy sector into the “green” energy sector, he found it was a mirage — that there is no coherent plan.

Ditto the federal government’s $12 billion climate change adaptation plan to build more weather-resistant public infrastructure across Canada.

The reason is the plan has been so watered down since its inception that the government now has little idea whether the projects it’s approving will give taxpayers good value for money when it comes to addressing climate change.

Trudeau’s climate plans are fantasies built on fantasies and they’re costing Canadians a fortune.
And he shows his commitment to reducing his own carbon footprint is zero .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,542
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Regina, Saskatchewan
There’s good news and bad news about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax for residents of the four provinces where it applies — Ontario, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The good news is that starting July 15 and four times annually after that, individuals and families living in these provinces are going to receive tax-free cheques, or direct deposit payments if they prefer, from the Trudeau government under its Climate Action Incentive Payment Plan.

Previously the rebates were a refundable tax credit, claimed on income tax returns.

The bad news is that, according to Yves Giroux, Parliament’s independent, non-partisan budget officer, most people receiving these cheques (60%), will pay a lot more in annual carbon taxes than they get back in carbon tax payments, and will do so every year up to 2030, at least.
In 2024, Giroux says, 80% of Ontario households will be paying more in carbon taxes than they receive in rebate cheques, with the same thing happening in Alberta in 2028.

The Trudeau government, by contrast, continues to claim 80% of households paying the carbon tax will be better off financially.

The difference in the competing claims is dramatic.

The Trudeau government claims the average household in Ontario this year will receive $134 more in carbon tax cheques than it pays in carbon taxes. Giroux says it will actually get $360 less.

For Alberta, the feds claim a $338 benefit, Giroux a $671 cost.

For Saskatchewan, the feds claim a $319 benefit, Giroux a $390 cost.

For Manitoba, the feds claim a $229 benefit, Giroux a $299 cost.

When Trudeau’s carbon tax, now $50 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions, reaches $170 per tonne in 2030, Giroux estimates the average net cost of the tax per household in Ontario will be $1,461 annually, $2,282 in Alberta, $1,464 in Saskatchewan and $1,145 in Manitoba.

Giroux’s calculations differ from the government’s because the feds only calculate the direct financial impact of the carbon tax — the amount paid by taxpayers versus the amount the government returns in rebates.

Giroux says those figures are accurate but they’re incomplete because they don’t include the added cost of the economic damage caused by the carbon tax.

Good Times….
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,542
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Why does the government’s carbon tax stay in effect when inflation is itself a huge carbon tax? The combination of the government driving up gasoline prices, and the world energy economy driving them up even more, is really hurting everyone on the economic edge. Especially so after two years of COVID shutdowns have already brought so many to a hard place. To charge a carbon tax when gasoline, without the tax, is shooting up like a rocket, make no sense.


A compassionate government would kill its green-driven carbon tax to offer both relief to most Canadians, and a signal that occasionally their welfare triumphs over the Gadarene rush to net zero. Maintaining the carbon tax during this particular time shows a cruel indifference to the majority of Canadian citizens, a triumph of environmental extremism over fundamental economic decency, and an elitist carelessness about the ways of everyday people.

Is it likely that governments will drop the carbon tax now that inflation is effectively the greatest carbon tax we have ever seen? The question is a dark joke.

Like April Fools….The rest of the above link.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
25,060
5,727
113
B.C.
There’s good news and bad news about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax for residents of the four provinces where it applies — Ontario, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The good news is that starting July 15 and four times annually after that, individuals and families living in these provinces are going to receive tax-free cheques, or direct deposit payments if they prefer, from the Trudeau government under its Climate Action Incentive Payment Plan.

Previously the rebates were a refundable tax credit, claimed on income tax returns.

The bad news is that, according to Yves Giroux, Parliament’s independent, non-partisan budget officer, most people receiving these cheques (60%), will pay a lot more in annual carbon taxes than they get back in carbon tax payments, and will do so every year up to 2030, at least.
In 2024, Giroux says, 80% of Ontario households will be paying more in carbon taxes than they receive in rebate cheques, with the same thing happening in Alberta in 2028.

The Trudeau government, by contrast, continues to claim 80% of households paying the carbon tax will be better off financially.

The difference in the competing claims is dramatic.

The Trudeau government claims the average household in Ontario this year will receive $134 more in carbon tax cheques than it pays in carbon taxes. Giroux says it will actually get $360 less.

For Alberta, the feds claim a $338 benefit, Giroux a $671 cost.

For Saskatchewan, the feds claim a $319 benefit, Giroux a $390 cost.

For Manitoba, the feds claim a $229 benefit, Giroux a $299 cost.

When Trudeau’s carbon tax, now $50 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions, reaches $170 per tonne in 2030, Giroux estimates the average net cost of the tax per household in Ontario will be $1,461 annually, $2,282 in Alberta, $1,464 in Saskatchewan and $1,145 in Manitoba.

Giroux’s calculations differ from the government’s because the feds only calculate the direct financial impact of the carbon tax — the amount paid by taxpayers versus the amount the government returns in rebates.

Giroux says those figures are accurate but they’re incomplete because they don’t include the added cost of the economic damage caused by the carbon tax.

Good Times….
File under , No shit Sherlock .
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,542
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113
Regina, Saskatchewan
In 2015, Trudeau noted that, “This is a tougher economy than it needs to be for the middle class and those who want to join it.” Since then, he has only made the situation worse.

With inflation hitting 7.7 per cent in May, nearly 50 per cent higher than a year earlier, and gas prices averaging around $2/litre, an increase of 60 per cent compared to last summer, however, those policies are proving to be economically devastating for the middle class.

The Trudeau Liberals had a choice to make: offer short-term relief for the working people they claim to be the defenders of, or prioritize their ideologically driven climate agenda at the expense of low-income and middle-class Canadians. They clearly chose the latter.

For months, the Liberals have been trying to deflect blame for rising prices by constantly reminding Canadians that inflation is a global problem resulting from factors that are largely out of their control. While strictly true, they have also steadfastly refused to do anything about government policies that contribute to high prices, such as the federal gasoline and carbon taxes, which collectively add about 21 cents per litre at the pump.

Speaking in the House of Commons last month, Liberal MP Rachel Bendayan said the government would not reduce gas taxes because “there is absolutely no guarantee these large oil and gas companies will pass on any savings to Canadian consumers.” That notion was disproved on July 1, when Ontario removed its 5.7-cent fuel tax and pump prices immediately dropped.

Other provinces, including Alberta and Newfoundland, have also lowered taxes. As has every other G7 country. But not the Government of Canada. In fact, not only are the Liberals digging in their heels and refusing to do anything about policies that make life less affordable, they’re doubling down by imposing new fuel and vehicle standards that will only make things worse.

Last week, the Liberals quietly announced new “clean fuel regulations,” which will force energy companies to reduce the “carbon intensity” of their fuels. The announcement was made without the usual pomp and fanfare we’ve come to expect from this government.

There was no gloating about how Trudeau is saving us from a warmer future; no virtue-signalling about how Canada is leading the way for other countries to follow. Because the Liberals know full well that the new regulations will only add to the financial strain felt by many Canadians.

The government’s own analysis estimates the new rules will increase the cost of diesel between seven and 16 cents, and add upwards of 13 cents per litre of gasoline, thus increasing “production costs for primary suppliers, which will increase prices for households and industrial users” and decrease GDP by $9 billion over the next eight years.

Meanwhile, the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, a federal agency, is pushing ahead with its Rolling Truck Age Program, which is set to take effect Sept. 15 and will forbid all trucks over 12 years old from entering the Port of Vancouver. The new regulation is expected to affect 360 drivers, or about 20 per cent of the trucks that currently move containers to and from the port.

This will prove to be a significant expense for many independent drivers and smaller shipping companies and will surely end up being passed on to consumers. Existing problems with snarled supply chains and increasing costs of food and consumers goods will be further exacerbated if the United Truckers Association goes ahead with a planned strike in August to protest the new measures.

While the new fuel standards and the Rolling Truck Age Program were in the works well before the current inflationary mess, the Liberals have steadfastly refused to address programs that artificially inflate prices and have instead moved ahead with policies that show just how little regard they have for middle-class Canadians.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
25,060
5,727
113
B.C.
In 2015, Trudeau noted that, “This is a tougher economy than it needs to be for the middle class and those who want to join it.” Since then, he has only made the situation worse.

With inflation hitting 7.7 per cent in May, nearly 50 per cent higher than a year earlier, and gas prices averaging around $2/litre, an increase of 60 per cent compared to last summer, however, those policies are proving to be economically devastating for the middle class.

The Trudeau Liberals had a choice to make: offer short-term relief for the working people they claim to be the defenders of, or prioritize their ideologically driven climate agenda at the expense of low-income and middle-class Canadians. They clearly chose the latter.

For months, the Liberals have been trying to deflect blame for rising prices by constantly reminding Canadians that inflation is a global problem resulting from factors that are largely out of their control. While strictly true, they have also steadfastly refused to do anything about government policies that contribute to high prices, such as the federal gasoline and carbon taxes, which collectively add about 21 cents per litre at the pump.

Speaking in the House of Commons last month, Liberal MP Rachel Bendayan said the government would not reduce gas taxes because “there is absolutely no guarantee these large oil and gas companies will pass on any savings to Canadian consumers.” That notion was disproved on July 1, when Ontario removed its 5.7-cent fuel tax and pump prices immediately dropped.

Other provinces, including Alberta and Newfoundland, have also lowered taxes. As has every other G7 country. But not the Government of Canada. In fact, not only are the Liberals digging in their heels and refusing to do anything about policies that make life less affordable, they’re doubling down by imposing new fuel and vehicle standards that will only make things worse.

Last week, the Liberals quietly announced new “clean fuel regulations,” which will force energy companies to reduce the “carbon intensity” of their fuels. The announcement was made without the usual pomp and fanfare we’ve come to expect from this government.

There was no gloating about how Trudeau is saving us from a warmer future; no virtue-signalling about how Canada is leading the way for other countries to follow. Because the Liberals know full well that the new regulations will only add to the financial strain felt by many Canadians.

The government’s own analysis estimates the new rules will increase the cost of diesel between seven and 16 cents, and add upwards of 13 cents per litre of gasoline, thus increasing “production costs for primary suppliers, which will increase prices for households and industrial users” and decrease GDP by $9 billion over the next eight years.

Meanwhile, the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, a federal agency, is pushing ahead with its Rolling Truck Age Program, which is set to take effect Sept. 15 and will forbid all trucks over 12 years old from entering the Port of Vancouver. The new regulation is expected to affect 360 drivers, or about 20 per cent of the trucks that currently move containers to and from the port.

This will prove to be a significant expense for many independent drivers and smaller shipping companies and will surely end up being passed on to consumers. Existing problems with snarled supply chains and increasing costs of food and consumers goods will be further exacerbated if the United Truckers Association goes ahead with a planned strike in August to protest the new measures.

While the new fuel standards and the Rolling Truck Age Program were in the works well before the current inflationary mess, the Liberals have steadfastly refused to address programs that artificially inflate prices and have instead moved ahead with policies that show just how little regard they have for middle-class Canadians.
At least they removed the threat of Tamara Lich formenting rebellion .
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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PM accusing premiers of dishonesty on carbon taxes is rich
Author of the article:Lorrie Goldstein
Publishing date:Sep 03, 2022 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • 33 Comments

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accusing Manitoba Premier Heather Stefanson and other premiers of being dishonest with Canadians about the impact of his carbon tax on the cost of living was pretty astounding in its hypocrisy.


“What the premier and others across the country don’t seem to be honest about with Canadians is in the places like Manitoba, where the federal price on pollution applies, average families get more money back from the price on pollution than the extra price on pollution costs them,” Trudeau said Thursday, before a meeting with Stefanson.


“We found a way of fighting climate change while supporting families who need that support, and that’s something that we are going to continue to do,” Trudeau said, as reported by The Canadian Press.

Trudeau was responding to a request from the premiers of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan to temporarily suspend the federal carbon tax to help people better cope with inflation. (Ontario is the fourth province where the PM imposed his carbon tax.)


Trudeau’s claim “average families” in these provinces get more back in carbon tax rebates than they pay in carbon taxes is based on his government’s claim 80% of households end up better off financially.

But in March, independent, non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux said when the negative financial impact of Trudeau’s carbon tax on the economy is considered — including reduced annual GDP, labour income and business investment — 60% of households in the four provinces end up worse off financially.

That will increase to 80% in Ontario in 2024 and to 80% in Alberta in 2028, the PBO said.

“Most households in provinces under the backstop will see a net loss resulting from federal carbon pricing … That is, household carbon costs will exceed the Climate Action Incentive payments households receive” Giroux said.


The differences claimed by the Trudeau government versus the PBO are startling.

For this year, the Trudeau government claims, average households in Manitoba will end up $229 ahead after paying the federal carbon tax because of the rebates. By contrast, the PBO says the average household in Manitoba will be $299 worse off.

In the three other provinces the relative numbers are:

Alberta: Feds say average household $338 better off, PBO says $671 worse off.

Saskatchewan: Feds says average household $319 better off, PBO $390 worse off.

Ontario: Feds say average household $134 better off, PBO $360 worse off.

Keep in mind, that’s just for this year, with a $50 carbon price per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions, which will increase annually to $170 in 2030.


With regard to misleading the public, prior to the 2019 election, the Trudeau government said his carbon price would be frozen at $50 per tonne from 2022 to 2030. After the election, the story changed.

In addition, the Trudeau government repeatedly claimed, starting in 2016, that it would meet its 2020 target for cutting emissions.

It missed its 2020 target by 57 million tonnes — the equivalent of all emissions from the electricity sector that year — even with the global recession caused by the pandemic slashing emissions all over the world.

Trudeau has refused a request from the premiers of the four Atlantic premiers to extend his deadline for them to submit plans to the federal government on how they will price emissions up to 2030, which expired Friday.

The premiers had asked for more time to implement measures to lessen the inflationary impact of carbon pricing on their citizens.

lgoldstein@postmedia.com
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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Wait. . . serious though admittedly ignorant question (dumb Yank, y'know). . . the Federal carbon tax is imposed on some provinces and not on others?
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
644
315
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Wait. . . serious though admittedly ignorant question (dumb Yank, y'know). . . the Federal carbon tax is imposed on some provinces and not on others?
Some provinces inflicted their own carbon scam tax on the population. As long as it is equal to, or greater than the fed scam tax it is good. It seems turdOWE's tax is really a wealth redistribution scheme, if some people get rebates and some don't.
BC had one of the first carbon scam taxes , to buy green votes. It was revenue neutral, in that it was offset by reductions in other taxes. Then we got an NDP government that upped the carbon tax and eliminated the reductions in other taxes so it became a cash cow.
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
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Be kinda interesting to meet the brain-trauma case who actually said, with a straight face, "Nobody will have a problem with us imposing a Federal tax unequally."
That is the Canadian way. I have lost track now, because I am no longer logging, but in the 1980s there was (maybe still is) a federal tax on marine fuel that only applied to the West Coast. There was the Crow freight rate, now gone, that made freight rates higher for manufactured goods going east from BC than the rate on those same cars brining manufactured goods West. To protect manufacturing in OntariOWE.
Another good one that I don't see how the government unions let pass. A civilian working for DND is paid different rates for the same job in different parts of the country based on the cost of living in that area.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
50,983
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That is the Canadian way. I have lost track now, because I am no longer logging, but in the 1980s there was (maybe still is) a federal tax on marine fuel that only applied to the West Coast. There was the Crow freight rate, now gone, that made freight rates higher for manufactured goods going east from BC than the rate on those same cars brining manufactured goods West. To protect manufacturing in OntariOWE.
Another good one that I don't see how the government unions let pass. A civilian working for DND is paid different rates for the same job in different parts of the country based on the cost of living in that area.
You people are weird.

I mean, we are too, but y'all got a whole 'nother flavor of weird going on up yonder.
 
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