April Fools!! Here's your Carbon Tax F#ckers!!!

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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The open letter shared Saturday was signed by the premiers of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

In the open letter, the premiers wrote that while they are pleased that Atlantic Canada has received a carbon price exemption on home heating oil, which around 30 per cent of residents use, they believe that similar exemptions need to follow.

“Many Canadians households do not use home heating oil and instead use all forms of heating to heat their homes. Winter is coming and these people also deserve a break,” the letter states. “It is of vital importance that federal policies and programs are made available to all Canadians in a fair and equitable way.”
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What the Atlantic Provinces need to ask is, “If the Liberals somehow manage to form Government again…what happens in three years?”
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
By now, the verdict is near-unanimous: the federal carbon tax is a farce. The exemption for heating oil in Atlantic Canada put a lie to the entire project: faced with declining fortunes in the East, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau blinked and chose votes over virtue. Cue the outstretched hands from the rest of the country: what about propane? what about natural gas? what about everyone who heats their house east of the Quebec-New Brunswick border?
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And now, what about farmers? They use a lot of natural gas and propane for irrigation, drying grain, preparing feed, and heating and cooling barns and greenhouses. They already get a tax exemption if they use gasoline and diesel for these tasks. Hence Bill C-234, a private member’s bill introduced by Conservative MP Ben Lobb, which would level the playing field by exempting all farmers from the carbon tax regardless of the type of fuel consumed.
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Bill C-234 passed the House of Commons in March, mostly thanks to opposition support, and trundled off to the Senate, where it passed first and second reading earlier this month. Then yesterday, bam! it got stuck in third reading, the last hurdle it faces before getting Royal Assent and becoming law, all thanks to some procedural sleight of hand from a few supposedly “independent” senators.
First, Sen. Lucie Moncion tabled an amendment to remove the potential extension of the tax exemptions beyond an established sunset period. This amendment mirrored one the Senate had already rejected earlier in the week, and came just days after senators rejected a committee report recommending to remove all but grain drying from the bill. Shortly after Moncion tabled her amendment, Sen. Bernadette Clement moved closure of debate, adjourning the matter until Nov. 21, despite the fact that Senators were already standing to debate the change.
1699986010567.jpeg
That’s out of order, and Conservative Senators Don Plett and Leo Housakos cried foul, but to no avail. Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre then picked up the mantle in the House of Commons, calling for a “massive pressure campaign” to push the governing Liberals to help pass the bill, which is supported by groups including the Grain Growers of Canada and the Canadian Pork Council.
First, Sen. Lucie Moncion tabled an amendment to remove the potential extension of the tax exemptions beyond an established sunset period. This amendment mirrored one the Senate had already rejected earlier in the week, and came just days after senators rejected a committee report recommending to remove all but grain drying from the bill. Shortly after Moncion tabled her amendment, Sen. Bernadette Clement moved closure of debate, adjourning the matter until Nov. 21, despite the fact that Senators were already standing to debate the change.
1699986511885.jpegThat’s out of order, and Conservative Senators Don Plett and Leo Housakos cried foul, but to no avail. Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre then picked up the mantle in the House of Commons, calling for a “massive pressure campaign” to push the governing Liberals to help pass the bill, which is supported by groups including the Grain Growers of Canada and the Canadian Pork Council.
1699986551920.jpeg
But that isn’t likely: both the prime minister and Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault have ruled out future carve-outs. “As long as I’m the environment minister, there will be no more exemptions to carbon pricing,” Guilbeault declared last week. (Hmm. If Bill C-234 does pass, will Guilbeault do like Sheila Copps did over the GST, and resign?)
1699986677358.jpeg
The hypocrisy is galling. This government is swift to call grocery CEOs on the carpet about high food prices, but when it comes to taking real action — like cutting the costs borne by farmers to produce food — it’s crickets. That’s because doing so would punch another hole in their precious carbon tax, and they know that if the carbon tax collapses, so does the whole enterprise. And quite possibly, Trudeau’s leadership.
1699986767501.jpeg
The demise of this signature policy is a symptom of a greater malaise: the crumbling of Liberal fortunes, and specifically, those of the prime minister, as his virtue-signaling agenda confronts harsh economic times and the failure of woke politics. Canadians struggling to pay the rent have no money for extra taxes, and no interest in being lectured. They also don’t appreciate the divide-and-conquer approach to national politics, whereby one region or sector gets preferential treatment and others are literally left in the cold.
1699986854587.jpeg
Instead, Trudeau’s intransigence on the carbon tax speaks volumes about his government’s priorities: it’s not about applying equal treatment to farmers, or helping Canadians when they need it most, but clinging to a legacy project. Without this tax, he will have failed to leave an enduring mark in the future of the country. In other words, it’s all about him.
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Prediction: if the carbon tax goes down, Trudeau will not run in the next election. If that vote is a referendum on his leadership, he won’t run a campaign where he has no leadership to run on.
1699987058683.jpeg
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,251
11,771
113
Low Earth Orbit
By now, the verdict is near-unanimous: the federal carbon tax is a farce. The exemption for heating oil in Atlantic Canada put a lie to the entire project: faced with declining fortunes in the East, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau blinked and chose votes over virtue. Cue the outstretched hands from the rest of the country: what about propane? what about natural gas? what about everyone who heats their house east of the Quebec-New Brunswick border?
View attachment 20001
And now, what about farmers? They use a lot of natural gas and propane for irrigation, drying grain, preparing feed, and heating and cooling barns and greenhouses. They already get a tax exemption if they use gasoline and diesel for these tasks. Hence Bill C-234, a private member’s bill introduced by Conservative MP Ben Lobb, which would level the playing field by exempting all farmers from the carbon tax regardless of the type of fuel consumed.
View attachment 20002
Bill C-234 passed the House of Commons in March, mostly thanks to opposition support, and trundled off to the Senate, where it passed first and second reading earlier this month. Then yesterday, bam! it got stuck in third reading, the last hurdle it faces before getting Royal Assent and becoming law, all thanks to some procedural sleight of hand from a few supposedly “independent” senators.
First, Sen. Lucie Moncion tabled an amendment to remove the potential extension of the tax exemptions beyond an established sunset period. This amendment mirrored one the Senate had already rejected earlier in the week, and came just days after senators rejected a committee report recommending to remove all but grain drying from the bill. Shortly after Moncion tabled her amendment, Sen. Bernadette Clement moved closure of debate, adjourning the matter until Nov. 21, despite the fact that Senators were already standing to debate the change.
View attachment 20003
That’s out of order, and Conservative Senators Don Plett and Leo Housakos cried foul, but to no avail. Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre then picked up the mantle in the House of Commons, calling for a “massive pressure campaign” to push the governing Liberals to help pass the bill, which is supported by groups including the Grain Growers of Canada and the Canadian Pork Council.
First, Sen. Lucie Moncion tabled an amendment to remove the potential extension of the tax exemptions beyond an established sunset period. This amendment mirrored one the Senate had already rejected earlier in the week, and came just days after senators rejected a committee report recommending to remove all but grain drying from the bill. Shortly after Moncion tabled her amendment, Sen. Bernadette Clement moved closure of debate, adjourning the matter until Nov. 21, despite the fact that Senators were already standing to debate the change.
View attachment 20004That’s out of order, and Conservative Senators Don Plett and Leo Housakos cried foul, but to no avail. Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre then picked up the mantle in the House of Commons, calling for a “massive pressure campaign” to push the governing Liberals to help pass the bill, which is supported by groups including the Grain Growers of Canada and the Canadian Pork Council.
View attachment 20005
But that isn’t likely: both the prime minister and Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault have ruled out future carve-outs. “As long as I’m the environment minister, there will be no more exemptions to carbon pricing,” Guilbeault declared last week. (Hmm. If Bill C-234 does pass, will Guilbeault do like Sheila Copps did over the GST, and resign?)
View attachment 20006
The hypocrisy is galling. This government is swift to call grocery CEOs on the carpet about high food prices, but when it comes to taking real action — like cutting the costs borne by farmers to produce food — it’s crickets. That’s because doing so would punch another hole in their precious carbon tax, and they know that if the carbon tax collapses, so does the whole enterprise. And quite possibly, Trudeau’s leadership.
View attachment 20007
The demise of this signature policy is a symptom of a greater malaise: the crumbling of Liberal fortunes, and specifically, those of the prime minister, as his virtue-signaling agenda confronts harsh economic times and the failure of woke politics. Canadians struggling to pay the rent have no money for extra taxes, and no interest in being lectured. They also don’t appreciate the divide-and-conquer approach to national politics, whereby one region or sector gets preferential treatment and others are literally left in the cold.
View attachment 20008
Instead, Trudeau’s intransigence on the carbon tax speaks volumes about his government’s priorities: it’s not about applying equal treatment to farmers, or helping Canadians when they need it most, but clinging to a legacy project. Without this tax, he will have failed to leave an enduring mark in the future of the country. In other words, it’s all about him.
View attachment 20009
Prediction: if the carbon tax goes down, Trudeau will not run in the next election. If that vote is a referendum on his leadership, he won’t run a campaign where he has no leadership to run on.
View attachment 20010
It's only going to get worse. They are gonna be kind and give us until after Christmas before shit hits the fan and oil goes nuts.

There is an usually high number of empty oil tankers sitting in the Gulf of Mexico. The Panama Canal could be shut down any day. There are already ship size restrictions happening. That will cause issues with traffic through the Suez which right now is vulnerable as fuck.

Screenshot_20231114_193946_MarineTraffic.jpgScreenshot_20231114_194554_MarineTraffic.jpg
Spooky shit going down. The red diamonds are anchored empty tankers. The pointy reds are under way but mostly Chem, LPG and LNG tankers



Chuck in the shortages that are hush hush...

 
Last edited:

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
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I have come to the conclusion that demanding TurdOWE remove the carbon scam tax is a risky move. If we wait for the election, even many liberals will vote against him. If he caves now, he can say “see, we listened to the peons”, and the gullible, AKA liberal voters will vote for him again.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
I have come to the conclusion that demanding TurdOWE remove the carbon scam tax is a risky move. If we wait for the election, even many liberals will vote against him. If he caves now, he can say “see, we listened to the peons”, and the gullible, AKA liberal voters will vote for him again.
They are clueing in that the carbon tax is a scam.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,955
1,795
113
They are clueing in that the carbon tax is a scam.
That may not be enough to keep the generational welfare families from voting for their free money. Especially when the rebate cheques are more than they paid in carbon scam taxes.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,251
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Low Earth Orbit
That may not be enough to keep the generational welfare families from voting for their free money. Especially when the rebate cheques are more than they paid in carbon scam taxes.
Nope. Check the numbers. Inflation killed any rebate and they know it. Immigrants aren't stupid
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,928
8,462
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
As the weather continued its downward slide into winter on Monday, the Saskatchewan government announced it would be taking its next step in its long-standing opposition to the federal carbon tax, with SaskEnergy.

Last week, the prime minister announced a three-year exemption to the carbon tax on heating oil, which is mostly used in the Atlantic provinces. The Saskatchewan government said only about 0.4 per cent of customers use heating oil in this province.

On Monday, Premier Scott Moe announced on social media that he was calling on the federal government to expand that exemption to all home heating or he would take things into his own hands and direct SaskEnergy to stop collecting and remitting the carbon tax to the federal government as of Jan. 1.

Moe wasn’t made available to speak to local media on Monday, but Dustin Duncan, minister responsible for all the major Crown Corporations including SaskEnergy, did answer questions.

“Our position will be that this is about fairness for Saskatchewan families and if it’s fair for one part of the country to not have to pay the carbon tax, then it should be fair for us here in Saskatchewan as well,” said Duncan.

He said the province is giving the federal government two months to, essentially, “do the right thing” on this.

Last year, SaskEnergy collected and paid about $172 million in the carbon tax to the federal government. Duncan explained that is split between the Crown’s customers and is added to their monthly bills as a rate rider, which ends up being around a third of a customer’s bill.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,251
11,771
113
Low Earth Orbit
As the weather continued its downward slide into winter on Monday, the Saskatchewan government announced it would be taking its next step in its long-standing opposition to the federal carbon tax, with SaskEnergy.

Last week, the prime minister announced a three-year exemption to the carbon tax on heating oil, which is mostly used in the Atlantic provinces. The Saskatchewan government said only about 0.4 per cent of customers use heating oil in this province.

On Monday, Premier Scott Moe announced on social media that he was calling on the federal government to expand that exemption to all home heating or he would take things into his own hands and direct SaskEnergy to stop collecting and remitting the carbon tax to the federal government as of Jan. 1.

Moe wasn’t made available to speak to local media on Monday, but Dustin Duncan, minister responsible for all the major Crown Corporations including SaskEnergy, did answer questions.

“Our position will be that this is about fairness for Saskatchewan families and if it’s fair for one part of the country to not have to pay the carbon tax, then it should be fair for us here in Saskatchewan as well,” said Duncan.

He said the province is giving the federal government two months to, essentially, “do the right thing” on this.

Last year, SaskEnergy collected and paid about $172 million in the carbon tax to the federal government. Duncan explained that is split between the Crown’s customers and is added to their monthly bills as a rate rider, which ends up being around a third of a customer’s bill.
Carbon tax on our latest gas bill was $33 of $141 total.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,928
8,462
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Carbon tax on our latest gas bill was $33 of $141 total.
That’s just on your heating bill that month.

No one in federal politics truly appreciates the importance of reliable and affordable electricity supply to provincial voters.

“As any (provincial) elected official knows, political graveyards are littered with the bodies of those who ran afoul of public opinion over electricity,” wrote the authors of a Public Policy Forum paper this year called the “Project of the Century,” about the rapid transition to a net-zero electricity system.


That lack of perspective helps explain why Ottawa and some provincial governments are talking past one another when it comes to new Clean Electricity Regulations, introduced by the feds last August.

(The Other Other Carbon Tax)

For the Liberal government, it’s all about the future benefits of a clean power grid that will be felt sometime in the next decade or so; for the impacted provinces, it is about keeping the lights on at an affordable cost for voters who consider reliable power to be a birthright.

The introduction of the new regulations barely created a ripple because 82.5 per cent of Canada’s electricity generation is emission-free, mainly in provinces like Quebec (99-per-cent emission-free), Manitoba (100 per cent), British Columbia (97 per cent), Ontario (94 per cent) and Newfoundland and Labrador (97 per cent).

But that relative calm masked the fact that three provinces and two territories operate electricity systems not blessed by hydro or nuclear power. Alberta and Saskatchewan, in particular, are reliant on fossil fuels for their generation and are larger emitters per unit of power than China or Russia.