Wokeism will DESTROY civilization… here’s how to stop it before it’s too late

Twin_Moose

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255 'Transgender' Inmates Request Transfer To Women's Prisons After California Passes New Law

BY TYLER DURDEN
WEDNESDAY, APR 07, 2021 - 08:19 AM

 
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Lindsay Shepherd: How Christie Blatchford exposed the Wilfrid Laurier thought police


Excerpted from Diversity and Exclusion: Confronting the Campus Free Speech Crisis by Lindsay Shepherd.

Christie Blatchford and I exchanged some initial emails and had a couple of brief phone calls so she could confirm the details of the incident, and ensure she got the facts straight. After I sent her the secretly-recorded audio, she wrote back to me, “I just listened. Jesus H. Christ, what a pompous pair of gits,” and “You do realize these people are INSANE?”

I was unsure, at that point, whether it was legal for me to have recorded the meeting. I was completely willing to be named in Christie’s piece, but I asked her not to mention the recording I sent her. She respected my wishes, and said she would use quotes from the recording without mentioning I had a tape of the conversation. I contacted Jordan Peterson through the email address on his website, explained what happened, and gave him a head’s up that I was going to the press, so he shouldn’t be shocked if he saw his name in the papers soon.

From the first time I spoke to Christie over the phone, I felt like I was talking to someone with genius levels of perceptiveness — someone who intuitively understood me and immediately understood the issues at hand.

Christie released her article on November 10, 2017, in the National Post. “Thought police strike again as Wilfrid Laurier grad student is chastised for showing Jordan Peterson video,” the article was titled. The subheading read “Her supervising professor told her that by showing the video to her ‘Canadian Communication in Context’ class, ‘it basically was like … neutrally playing a speech by Hitler …’”

I read over her article. In the meeting, I had barely even noticed Rambukkana’s comment comparing Peterson to Hitler. When you’re in a high-stress situation like a disciplinary meeting, some of the most revealing comments can go unnoticed.

By the time I clicked on Christie’s article, readers were already pouring into the comment section. Throughout that whole day and the next, I was continually refreshing the comment section, not wanting to miss a single comment. “Long live Jordan Peterson,” “RIP Free speech on campus,” and “What a world we live in when the 22-year old TA has more sense and courage than those corrupt professors,” the comments read. It seemed to me that the verdict was in: I was in the right. There were some comments on the skeptical side: “Sounds like a god-awful situation, but this is just the TA’s side of things, we don’t know what was really said in that room.” Those comments were totally fair: at that point, I had no intention of ever making it known that I had an audio recording of the meeting. At least Christie Blatchford knew that I hadn’t twisted any component of the story. My fears about being widely denounced online washed away: the praise was by far outweighing any negative comments.

I sent the Christie Blatchford piece to a couple of my close friends and family members, who all congratulated me for getting the story in the media. Christie also forwarded me some emails from readers who wanted to send me a message of support. I made sure to get my own hard copy of the newspaper for memory’s sake — I took the bus over to Conestoga Mall and bought the last National Post from the stands at the convenience store. Sure enough, Christie’s column was on page A5. I proudly took the newspaper home and stashed it in a bag of mementos that I kept in my closet, where I put special cards, photos, ticket stubs, and other reminders of meaningful moments.

The next day, Wilfrid Laurier University acknowledged the article: they sent out a news release on November 11, 2017 saying simply:

The National Post recently published a column that referred to Wilfrid Laurier University. The university is committed to fostering a learning environment that is open and challenging but also welcoming and supportive of all students. The university is engaging a neutral third party to gather facts regarding the situation referenced in the column. Because of the privacy issues involved, we will follow established internal processes. It is important to understand that the issues involved in this matter are complex and affect all universities.

I didn’t think much of the statement, as no one had contacted me about any third-party investigation.

My work was now done. All I had wanted was one single article that exposed the professors, the Communication Studies department, the diversity office, and the preposterousness of the meeting. Christie told me to let her know if I faced any fallout, and thanked me for reaching out. I was feeling rather proud: I had done my part to notify the wider Canadian public about the suppression of free thought in academia. I could die tomorrow knowing that I had made a societal contribution in my life.

A few days later, Christie Blatchford notified me that a Laurier liberal arts professor, David Haskell, was looking for my contact information — he had written an op-ed in the Toronto Star that supported me. He wrote:

Quotes from the meeting, which Shepherd recorded, show that she was subjected to a barrage of accusations as her motives and character were called into question. She was ultimately told she was not allowed to expose students to views like those of Peterson because, according to her thesis adviser, discussions that create “an unsafe learning environment” are “not up for debate.”

To her credit, during her inquisition Shepherd had the courage to suggest that it was not the duty of the university to make students comfortable but to make them think. Had she been given more chance to speak, she might have also noted that claiming certain ideas can make a classroom “unsafe” is, for the most part, an unscientific ruse used by many to simply rationalize censorshi
p.

Once I got in touch with him, Haskell told me he was in contact with Global TV and could arrange for them to come to campus to film a segment about the Laurier controversy. Haskell was a strong proponent of free expression and open inquiry, and wanted the story to gain more traction.

The Global segment was airing that same evening on the nightly news. I didn’t have access to cable in my basement suite, but wanted to watch it right when it aired, so I went to the campus pub that night and asked the bartenders to change the channel to Global. I could hardly hear any sound coming from the speakers, but there I was on the screen, in my pink ski jacket and purple glasses.

“Hey look, it’s Laurier!” a pubgoer exclaimed, pointing to the B-roll on-screen of the campus quad earlier that day.

I then saw a still picture of my face on-screen, with some direct quotes from the meeting, and an audio waveform moving up and down. I realized Global TV had included an excerpt of my original audio recording. I had sent it to them when they asked to review it, but I couldn’t recall ever giving explicit permission for them to publicize any part of it. Oh well, nothing I could do about it now.

But once people heard the recording for themselves, that’s when everything got really, really crazy.

 
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spaminator

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WOKE WATCH! GOP free speech fan wants porn site cancelled
Arizona Republican Paul Gosar wants to cancel mom and pop porn site OnlyFans and wants it investigated for prostitution

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Apr 06, 2021 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read • 18 Comments
From pastor to porn star. Former minister Nikole Mitchell feels her "whole self" now that she's stripping on OnlyFans.
From pastor to porn star. Former minister Nikole Mitchell feels her "whole self" now that she's stripping on OnlyFans. SCREENGRAB
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What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

Arizona Republican Paul Gosar counts himself as a free speech advocate and foe of cancel culture. In fact, he authored some awkwardly entitled legislation called Stop Censorship Act of 2020.

Now even commercial truckers are trying to run fake plates in Ontario
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But wait… it now seems that Gosar wants to cancel mom and pop porn site OnlyFans and wants it investigated for prostitution.

He said: “On this site, individuals can advertise their willingness to travel across state lines for illegal or immoral activities, and the platform providing publicity for these individuals appears to subsidize and capitalize off this travel. It is worth investigating this issue further.”

Paul Gosar, an enemy of cancel culture, wants to cancel OnlyFans.
Paul Gosar, an enemy of cancel culture, wants to cancel OnlyFans. PHOTO BY PAUL GOSAR /TWITTER
Not so and he doesn’t have a hope in hell of shuttering the site. The site goes to great lengths to prevent users from facilitating in-person encounters.

Going on ad nauseam about the evils of the site, he pointed to “prostitution, child exploitative material, and illicit sexual coercion” but fails to offer a single example.

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#CancelthisPrude.

Is this tree a toxic racist? An Oregon school director says a school’s new emblem of an evergreen could trigger memories of lynching. Another member says, uh, no it won’t. Oh, Portland. Trees Ontario Photo
Is this tree a toxic racist? An Oregon school director says a school’s new emblem of an evergreen could trigger memories of lynching. Another member says, uh, no it won’t. Oh, Portland. Trees Ontario Photo
ARE TREES TRIGGERING? IN PORTLAND, MAYBE!

If Portland, Ore. didn’t exist, someone would have to invent it.

The Pacific coast city known for all manner of wokeness, petty social justice gripes and grovelling politicians has done it again.

This time, a high school had been considering changing its mascot from a trojan to an evergreen tree.

But it seems there are concerns about the tree’s link to lynchings and that’s not good.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett High School was renamed earlier this year after the famed Black activist and reporter who documented lynchings in the deep south.

The school had settled on an evergreen tree as its new mascot after students and staff selected it.

Oh dear, a vote was stopped at the board of education because one of the directors said there were “concerns” from the community about the tree’s imagery.


“I’m wondering if there was any concern with the imagery there, in using a tree … as our mascot? I think everyone comes with blind spots and I think that might’ve been a really big blind spot,” said Michelle DePass, Portland Public Schools Board of Education Director.

Of course, the lone saner head on the board said the issue had been brought up and no one could think of an evergreen tree associated with lynching.

“[Using the evergreen as a mascot] had nothing to do with the horrible history of lynching in the United States. Lynching trees typically are not evergreens,” Martin Osborne, who is Black, told The Portland Tribune.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
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Extinction Rebellion's Middle Class Leftie Own Goal​

These loony Lefties don't like glass

 

Twin_Moose

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Woka-Cola got a wake up call

Coca-Cola says it's 'time to find common ground' on voting measures after pressure from the Right

by Zachary Halaschak, Economics Reporter |

| April 14, 2021 02:31 PM

Coca-Cola, whose CEO denounced the Georgia voting bill, is now striking a conciliatory tone after coming under pressure from conservatives.

The soda giant, which is based in Atlanta, was absent from a list of more than 500 corporations and individuals that signed a statement condemning any election legislation that would “restrict” voters from having “an equal and fair opportunity to cast a ballot.” The missive was placed as a two-page Wednesday ad in the New York Times and Washington Post, with the effort being organized by the Black Economic Alliance.

Coca-Cola said in a statement to the Washington Examiner on Wednesday that the company “had not seen the letter” initiated by the alliance but is “certainly open to hearing their perspective." It said it has supported the right to vote and that it will assess how to support voting rights.

COCA-COLA AND DELTA ABSENT FROM CORPORATE VOTING RIGHTS STATEMENT AFTER GOP PRESSURE

“We believe the best way to make progress now is for everyone to come together to listen, respectfully share concerns and collaborate on a path forward. We remain open to productive conversations with advocacy groups and lawmakers who may have differing views," the company said. "It’s time to find common ground. In the end, we all want the same thing – free and fair elections, the cornerstone of our democracy.”

Coca-Cola’s Wednesday remarks are notably less confrontational than its previous statements on the Georgia voting law.

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spaminator

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WOKE WORDS: Scrabble ‘modernizes’ by banning hundreds of words
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 14, 2021 • 10 hours ago • 1 minute read • 14 Comments
New brand look of the blue Scrabble board is unveiled on National Scrabble Day, in London, Britain in this undated handout photo.
New brand look of the blue Scrabble board is unveiled on National Scrabble Day, in London, Britain in this undated handout photo. PHOTO BY MATTEL /MATTEL via REUTERS
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You can no longer use *that* racial slur for a word score in Scrabble.

That’s because Mattel, the owner of the iconic board game, has banned 400 derogatory words from Scrabble’s official word list.


According to the U.K. Times, racial slurs against Black, Caucasian, Pakistani and Irish people are among those Mattel — which sets the official rules of the game in every area outside North America — has turfed.

Ray Adler, Mattel’s global head of games, told The Times the list of forbidden words was inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, stating because of the “social unrest” that occurred worldwide, Mattel had “looked at everything we were doing as a company and opportunities to be more culturally relevant.”


“I’ve heard the argument that these are just words, but we believe they have meaning.”

While Black Lives Matter inspired the change, Adler admitted the real reason for updating was due to declining sales. To get the game “to the next generation of Scrabble fans, we need to modernize it.”

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But the move has drawn fire by some , with three members of the global Scrabble players’ organisation quitting, according to news.com.au. Critics say words that are in the dictionary should be OK to play, and point to words that are still permitted but are considered derogatory, such as bitch, since the definition can mean a female dog.

Hasbro — which owns the rights to Scrabble in North America — has also removed words from play. The toy company recently rebranded Mr. Potato Head by dropping “Mr.” from the name in order to make the toy more gender-neutral.

The banned Scrabble terms are not in a published list, but players can input words on Scrabble check websites to see if they can be used.
 

spaminator

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MANDEL: Durham cops told to remove 'Support our Troops' decals
Author of the article:Michele Mandel
Publishing date:Apr 14, 2021 • 11 hours ago • 3 minute read • 42 Comments
Durham Police brass have ordered yellow 'Support Our Troops' ribbon decals be taken off the force's cruisers.
Durham Police brass have ordered yellow 'Support Our Troops' ribbon decals be taken off the force's cruisers. PHOTO BY TORONTO SUN STAFF /Toronto Sun
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For the first time in 15 years, Durham Regional Police vehicles have been stripped of their yellow “Support our Troops” decals and officers have been ordered to remove their lapel pins.

The new directive has drawn the ire of both past and present members of DRPS.


In an internal service-wide memo obtained by the Toronto Sun, the interim deputy chief said consultations have led them to enact their new policy.

“The wearing of the Yellow Ribbon pin became symbolic as a source of support from our service for our military troops in active combat, as a result of the 9/11 terrorist attack,” reads the March 4 directive from Joseph Maiorano.

“This campaign is completed. Our wearing of this pin will no longer be part of our uniform dress and the Yellow Ribbon symbol will no longer be affixed on our police vehicles.”

According to police association president Colin Goodwin, the surprising decision was presented without any form of consultation and has angered many, including members who are veterans of missions in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as those who served as UN peacekeepers in other parts of the world.

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“They’re very disappointed,” he said. “There’s always been a close connection between the police and the military, both are putting yourself out there to protect other people.”

The idea for the cruiser decals dates back to 2006 after DRPS officers spontaneously attended every Hwy. 401 ramp in Durham Region to pay tribute to fallen soldiers who were being transported from CFB Trenton to Toronto.

“We expressed our disappointment to the chief,” said Goodwin. “It’s the chief’s decision to make, but I hope the service changes its mind, and we go back to putting them on our cruisers.”

Retired sergeant Tom Andrews calls it a ridiculous decision.


“Perhaps the good folks at the top could explain their reasoning to all the parents and loved ones who have their sons and daughters currently in far off lands, serving our country placing themselves in harm’s way?”

In a complaint filed with the Office of the Independent Police Review Director, Andrews argued the directive reflects badly on the 10th-largest police service in Canada.

“There is nothing offensive nor politically charged in the symbolic yellow ribbon. It is a neutral symbol supporting our members of the Canadian Armed Forces who are currently deployed around the world,” he wrote. “It is a display of respect and appreciation.

“The Highway of Heroes flows through the entire Durham region,” he continued. “Is the DRPS executive leadership team going to next have heavy black plastic bags placed over these signs based on their failed and flawed reasoning?”

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The DRPS did not respond to a request for comment.

The internal police directive also bans the wearing of any non-issued pins, tie-tacks, clips and patches as a personal expression of support for a particular cause or community group.

“Now is the time to put our individual expressions aside and stand together as one unified team, consistent in appearance and in service to our community,” the notice says.

Andrews says the decision stems from the recent controversy that has raged over wearing the “Thin Blue Line” patch, seen by some as a symbol of ‘us versus them’ police solidarity that has been recently hijacked, especially in the U.S., by white nationalist groups.

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Wearing the insignia, which depicts a black and white Canadian flag with a blue stripe through the middle, has been recently banned by the RCMP and Ottawa Police.

But extending the policy to include the removal of police-issued “Support our Troops” decals and pins is “political correctness run amok,” Andrews argues.

“Why throw the baby out with the bathwater?” he asks. “What were they thinking?”

mmandel@postmedia.com
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spaminator

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Toronto real estate board to drop 'master bedroom' term
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 14, 2021 • 10 hours ago • 1 minute read • 62 Comments
The Toronto real estate market is red hot.
The Toronto real estate market is red hot. PHOTO BY TYLER ANDERSON /Postmedia files
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Master bedrooms appear to be a thing of the past — at least when it comes to real estate descriptions in the Greater Toronto Area.

The Toronto Regional Real Estate Board’s president, Lisa Patel, said in an email it will stop using the word “master” and instead use the word “primary” when referencing the main or principal bedrooms in homes in the coming months, according to The Canadian Press.


The word “master” has been viewed by many as a reference to racism, as well as sexism and slavery.

The change in terminology would reportedly apply to entries in its MLS system, on TRREB.ca and on its Webforms platform, used by realtors to share forms with clients.

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New brand look of the blue Scrabble board is unveiled on National Scrabble Day, in London, Britain in this undated handout photo.
WOKE WORDS: Scrabble ‘modernizes’ by banning hundreds of words
Penelope Wild says COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on Toronto's real estate market.
WILD: Low supply, high demand wreak havoc on Toronto real estate market

The TRREB’s board of directors approved the change following a recommendation made by its diversity and inclusion committee.

Last October, the Canadian Real Estate Association swapped out the word master for primary on Realtor.ca, upon the recommendation of the Real Estate Standards Organization.

–– with files from The Canadian Press
 

spaminator

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MANDEL: Durham Regional Police rightly reverse order to remove 'Support Our Troops' decals following outcry
Author of the article:Michele Mandel
Publishing date:Apr 15, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 3 minute read • 7 Comments
Durham Police brass have reversed an order that yellow 'Support Our Troops' ribbon decals be taken off the force's cruisers.
Durham Police brass have reversed an order that yellow 'Support Our Troops' ribbon decals be taken off the force's cruisers. PHOTO BY TORONTO SUN STAFF /Toronto Sun
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The outcry was too overwhelming to ignore.

On Thursday, we wrote about the asinine decision by Durham Regional Police that ordered members to remove all “Support Our Troops” yellow ribbon lapel pins and vehicle decals.


By late afternoon, the chief had reversed the policy.

“Within the past few days, we have heard from some members of the community and our own Service regarding the ‘yellow ribbon’ decals on some police vehicles and plans to find different ways to honour our troops. This led to misperceptions in the community that questioned our commitment to our troops,” Interim chief Todd Rollauer said in a press release.

“I have therefore ordered that the decals will continue to be displayed. At the same time, I will be asking staff and members of our command team to continue our discussions with the Canadian Forces and others on the most meaningful way the DRPS can continue to demonstrate our unwavering support for our troops going forward.”

Well, it’s not exactly a mea culpa — but the end result is welcome nonetheless.

In its March 4 directive, interim deputy Joseph Maiorano said the yellow ribbon had been adopted in support of Canadian troops in active combat following 9/11.

“This campaign is completed,” he wrote in the service-wide email obtained by the Toronto Sun. “Our wearing of this pin will no longer be part of our uniform dress and the Yellow Ribbon symbol will no longer be affixed on our police vehicles.”

Police association president Colin Goodwin said his phone blew up with outrage from officers as well as police union presidents from across the province.

“It pissed off a lot of our members,” he said. “There was a lot of shock and questions of ‘Why?’ and to this day, I still don’t know why they thought this was a good idea at all.

“And then their reaction turned to anger.”

The move was seen as especially disrespectful by the many DRPS officers who serve in the reserve or are veterans of past conflicts. The close ties between the military and police are long-standing, Goodwin explained. “It’s about our members in both putting ourselves on the line, literally, to protect others.”

And as retired sergeant Tom Andrews noted, there are thousands of Canadian troops who continue to represent our country around the world. Their role has hardly come to an end.

Readers were equally infuriated.

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“The yellow ribbon is not offensive to anyone,” wrote one. “It’s only a show of support and respect for those who lay down their lives for us.”

Durham’s yellow ribbons date back 15 years.

The decals and pins were issued by DRPS in 2006 as a way to make official what was happening spontaneously across the region: as a tribute to fallen soldiers being transported from CFB Trenton to downtown Toronto, officers would turn out at every Hwy. 401 ramp and bridge to show their support.

So why remove them now?

The yellow ribbon may have been collateral damage of the Durham police decision to also ban the wearing of any non-issued pins, tie-tacks, clips and patches as a personal expression of support for a particular cause.

“Now is the time to put our individual expressions aside and stand together as one unified team, consistent in appearance and in service to our community,” the notice says.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Durham Police brass have ordered yellow 'Support Our Troops' ribbon decals be taken off the force's cruisers.
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The major target is believed to be the controversial “Thin Blue Line” insignia, a symbol of police solidarity that has been co-opted by far-right groups.

But who could the yellow ribbon possibly offend? Andrews called it “political correctness run amok.”

Thankfully, Sun readers helped bring about a welcome about-face.

mmandel@postmedia.com
 
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