WE really need to get rid of this guy

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
9,120
2,113
113
New Brunswick
Yeah, get the hate for Trudeau, I don't like him either.

But shit like this helps NO one. And makes the Haters look like fucking psycho's. (and yes, I'd say the same about a place if they got bombed like this for holding something regarding PP or anyone else). Also more proof that no matter WHAT he does, it's never "Right".

Even if it's just going to a place and enjoying a small company's success.

1707622417729.png
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,792
3,640
113
Edmonton
Yeah, get the hate for Trudeau, I don't like him either.

But shit like this helps NO one. And makes the Haters look like fucking psycho's. (and yes, I'd say the same about a place if they got bombed like this for holding something regarding PP or anyone else). Also more proof that no matter WHAT he does, it's never "Right".

Even if it's just going to a place and enjoying a small company's success.

View attachment 21086
I detest Trudeau and make it clear that I don't like him but I would never abuse a company that simply "hosted" a campaign event. One has nothing to do with the other & it's truly unfortunate. It reflects badly on all of us who disagree with Liberal policies & dislike their leader. Their hatred towards Trudeau is much like the hatred of Trump which is truly unfortunate.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,828
7,090
113
B.C.
Yeah, get the hate for Trudeau, I don't like him either.

But shit like this helps NO one. And makes the Haters look like fucking psycho's. (and yes, I'd say the same about a place if they got bombed like this for holding something regarding PP or anyone else). Also more proof that no matter WHAT he does, it's never "Right".

Even if it's just going to a place and enjoying a small company's success.

View attachment 21086
Maybe check the Brewers Pantry twitter feed and check out all the hate .
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Cornwall man accused of threatening to kill PM, MP was released from custody on Feb. 1
Author of the article:postmedia News
Postmedia News
Hugo Rodrigues
Published Feb 09, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 2 minute read

A 28-year-old man charged with uttering a death threat to Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry MP Eric Duncan last month was released from custody on Feb. 1 after a bail hearing in Cornwall court, less than four months after being charged with threatening to kill the prime minister.


James Twigg, 28, was released from custody on consent after a hearing held before the Ontario Justice of the Peace Sylvie-Emanuelle Bourbonnais, on a $500 bond that includes the conditions he report to the John Howard Society’s bail-supervision program before Feb. 5, reside at an address approved by the bail-supervision program, not contact or communicate with Duncan or Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in any way, not be within 100 metres of any location where either could be, and not possess any weapons.


Twigg had been charged by Cornwall police with uttering a death threat to Duncan by phone on Jan. 7. He was arrested by police on Jan. 31 and held in police custody until the bail hearing held on Feb. 1.

It’s the second time Twigg was released after being charged with uttering threats.


Court records show he was charged on Aug. 24 for sending a text message with a threat to kill Trudeau and unnamed other people on Aug. 23. For that charge, after a hearing before Justice of the Peace Claire Winchester, he was released without a bond, on conditions to reside at his Cornwall address, notify Cornwall police of any change of address, not possess and weapons, and attend an appointment with the Canadian Mental Health Association scheduled for September.

The court documents tied to the August charge show he completed a diversion program, and subsequently entered into a peace bond under Section 810 of the Criminal Code of Canada on Dec. 14. The bond included the condition he keep the peace and be of good behaviour for a period of 12 months, though the court record for that day includes a note he return to court on April 15 to enter a plea.


In a peace bond, the accused agrees to comply by certain conditions set by the court, and the Crown agrees to stay its prosecution of the charges the person is facing.

When he was charged on Jan. 31, it was an allegation he breached the condition of his peace bond. The release order issued in August was cancelled on Feb. 1– though subsequently replaced with the new release order issued that day.

Twigg’s release on consent coincides with the day the decision was made to close Duncan’s Cornwall constituency office on Brookdale Avenue.

Duncan issued a statement about the closure Wednesday, referring only to a “serious security issue” that led to the closure decision, and specifying he wouldn’t offer any further comment on the matter. His satellite constituency offices in Winchester and Morrisburg remain open during their scheduled hours, as does his office on Parliament Hill.

Twigg is scheduled to appear by video in Cornwall court on March 7; his previous court date for an in-person appearance on April 15 remains in place.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Putin makes Canada's embarrassing 'Nazi in parliament' story worldwide news
It’s hard to ignore the Russian president utilizing a Canadian story to justify his war


Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Feb 09, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

Just when embarrassed Canadians were starting to forget a former Nazi unit soldier getting a standing ovation in the House of Commons, along comes Vladimir Putin telling Tucker Carlson it’s one of the reasons Russia remains at war in Ukraine.


This was big news last September in Canada but what no one saw coming was that the Jaroslav Hunka affair would end up highlighted to the whole world in what is being called the most-watched interview of all time.


In fact, Putin used the incident in Parliament with the 98-year-old former Waffen SS soldier – invited by Speaker of the House Anthony Rota to attend the address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy – as one of his justifications for continued prosecution of bloody war in Ukraine.

While saying he understands Ukrainians are entitled to be a “separate people,” he believes “not on the basis of Nazism.”

When independent journalist Carlson challenged Putin by saying, “Hitler has been dead for 80 years,” the long-serving Russian leader called Carlson’s question “pesky and subtle” while seizing the moment to add his version of history to an already lengthy 30-minute history lesson on Russia.


“You say Hitler has been dead for so many years,” Putin said through a translator. “But his example lives on. The people who exterminated the Jews, Russians and Poles are still alive. And the president, the current president of today’s Ukraine, applauds him in the Canadian Parliament … can we say that we have completely uprooted his ideology?”

He was referring to Hunka being cheered by members of Parliament.


“The Canadian parliament introduced the man who, as the speaker of the parliament said, fought against the Russians during World War Two. Well, who fought against the Russians during World War One? Hitler and his accomplices,” said Putin. “And it turned out that this man served in the SS troops.”

Putin made the point that Hitler’s “SS troops consisted of Ukrainian nationalists who did this dirty work” and “the President of Ukraine stood up with the entire Parliament of Canada and applauded this man. How can this be imagined?”


It did happen and MP Rota was the fall guy.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who Friday told The Canadian Press that Putin “will use whatever propaganda he can” to try to justify the war, did apologize to Zelenskyy in September for the terrible misstep. But when the dust settled, it was Rota taking the blame.



Rota resigned as the speaker for being the one who invited Hunka, a constituent from his Nipissing riding. Even Friday, just 16 hours after the Carlson interview dropped on Elon Musk’s X platform, the Prime Minister’s office re-iterated that Trudeau played no role in the invitation to Hunka.


“The Prime Minister had no knowledge of this individual before the independent recognition by the former Speaker of the House of Commons,” spokesperson Mohammad Hussain said.



“Last September, there was a community event with the President of Ukraine in Toronto with over 1,000 people invited. Hundreds of Canadians were invited upon the recommendation of groups like the Ukrainian Canadian Congress,” Hussain said. “The individual in question’s name was submitted by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. The individual did not attend. Knowing what is known now – the individual shouldn’t have been invited.”

While Opposition Leader Pierre Poilievre showed an actual invitation from the PMO, the Trudeau government was still insisting on Friday that the Prime Minister knew nothing about it.



Whether this was all an accident or a misunderstanding, it’s a moot point now that Putin has chosen to exploit it.



I was surprised about how little mainstream media coverage this received. But it’s hard to ignore Putin utilizing a Canadian story to justify his war.



“What we see happening today, that is what de-Nazification is in our understanding,” said Putin. “We have to get rid of these people who maintain this concept and support this practice to try to prevent it.”

Whether or not you agree with Putin, one fact that is indisputable is that hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians and Russians are reported to have died or been wounded in this deadly conflict.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
https://twitter.com/TPostMillennial...ssing-nazi-in-parliament-story-worldwide-news
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Former MP Raj Grewal sues for damages following acquittal last year
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Feb 11, 2024 • 2 minute read

OTTAWA — Former Liberal MP Raj Grewal is seeking millions of dollars in damages from the RCMP and the Ontario attorney general after being acquitted of using his political office for personal gain.


In a statement of claim filed in Ontario Superior Court, Grewal’s counsel alleges the Mounties were negligent in their investigation and that the Crown breached his right to a fair trial by unreasonably pursuing the prosecution.


Grewal left the federal Liberal caucus in 2018 after his gambling problem came to light, and he chose not to run for re-election in the Ontario riding of Brampton East the following year.

In 2020, the RCMP charged him with four counts of breach of trust and one count of fraud over $5,000.

The Crown alleged that Grewal offered access to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and help with immigration files in exchange for large loans that went toward his gambling debt.

A judge concluded that a reasonable jury, given proper instruction, would not have been able to return a guilty verdict, and she therefore acquitted Grewal of the two breach of trust counts still on the table at that point.


Grewal says while he sought financial help from friends and family to cover gambling losses, he never did so in connection with his duties or privileges as an MP.

“The fundamental flaws in the case against Mr. Grewal were obvious from the early stages of the investigation,” reads the statement of claim.

“The State must not be permitted to use the coercive powers of the criminal justice system to pursue meritless charges.”

Grewal’s acquittal, on its own, does not rectify or excuse the RCMP’s negligence and the Crown’s misuse of the criminal justice system, adds the statement.

It says Grewal suffered “significant and ongoing damages” as a result of these actions, as he was forced to live with the social stigma of being an accused person and suffered irreparable damage to his budding political career.


“He was also forced to incur the significant expense of retaining and instructing counsel to represent him in a criminal proceeding that lasted far longer than it reasonably should have,” the statement reads.

“To this day, as the enduring damage to his reputation persists despite his acquittal, Mr. Grewal continues to face difficulty obtaining reasonable financing to purchase commercial and personal assets, among other business losses.”

The provincial attorney general and the RCMP will have an opportunity to respond to Grewal’s unproven allegations as the court case unfolds.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 11, 2024.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Bowmanville brewery flooded with hateful emails, reviews, after Trudeau visit
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Feb 13, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read

A small Ontario brewery has received an uptick of negative reviews and offensive emails after it recently hosted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.


Trudeau visited Brewer’s Pantry in Bowmanville on Feb. 8 to show support for Liberal candidate Robert Rock in an upcoming federal byelection in the riding of Durham.


“Our venue was asked to host as we are welcoming to all and supportive of our community,” owner Chris Aucoin explained on social media.

“Our support of small-batch Ontario beer and craft beverages was highlighted many times leading up to and during the event,” he added in his Instagram post. “Our pride was overflowing, and we posted a picture last night to share with our Pantry family.”

That photo and all other photos from Trudeau’s visit have been taken down after the small business was inundated with hateful comments from “our so-called ‘community,’” which Aucoin noted were from “people that have never supported or visited us before.”


Aucoin also said they were also hit with “dozens of negative Google reviews,” “countless offensive emails” and “phone calls at all hours of night.”



The comments have since been turned off the brewer’s Instagram account and limited on its Facebook page, but some were still visible.

“So ashamed of him, and anyone that supports him needs more help than money can offer,” one woman wrote.

Another commented: “Support tyrants and watch your business suffer.”

A third person chimed in, “Must have been a nice time. Just you, Castro, Stalin, and Mao illegally drinking in public after a busy week destroying the country.”

Aucoin insisted he isn’t a political person.

“I am not political. I am not a politician. I do not have thick skin,” he wrote.

“These are comments about my business that I am passionate about, and very proud of,” he continued.

“Your comments and abusive phone calls hurt me,” he said. “Your attempts to bring down my Google reviews hurt my reputation.”


The business has had its share of supporters, which he admitted “means a lot.”

As for the haters: “To those of you that judge us by who we have in our business, then I suggest maybe visiting us before you wish us bankruptcy, protests, violence, and outright hatred.”

In a follow-up post, Aucoin said “so many people stood up for us” and responded with great Google reviews to balance things out.



“We understand a lot of people are not happy, and they do not approve of our prime minister,” Aucoin wrote, adding he has never publicly endorsed any government.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
FAO report a scathing indictment of Ford’s fiscal management
Ontarians shouldn’t expect a balanced budget until 2026-27

Author of the article:Jay Goldberg
Published Feb 14, 2024 • Last updated 16 hours ago • 3 minute read

It’s not exactly breaking news to say the Ford government is failing Ontarians when it comes to managing the province’s finances, but a new report from the Financial Accountability Office shows just how bad things are.


Before exploring the report, let’s set the scene.


When Ford came to power in 2018, Ontario’s debt was roughly $324 billion. Government spending in former premier Kathleen Wynne’s final year in office stood at $158.5 billion and the province was running a $6.7-billion deficit.

In running to replace Wynne in 2018, Ford condemned Wynne for her poor management of the province’s books.

“The party is over with taxpayers’ money,” Ford promised, encouraging Ontarians to turn the page on 15 years of Liberal overspending and runaway deficits.

Ontarians decided to make a change and sent Ford to Queen’s Park to be a bull in a china shop and put an end to the province’s free spending ways.

Instead of ending the party with taxpayers’ money, Ford took it over. It’s like one frat house party ended and a new one, just as loud and disturbing as the first, began.


Fast forward six years later.

Ontario’s books are still in the red. The spending parade is still going on. And far from being a bull in a china shop, Ford is like a purring cat, watching the province’s finances crumble all around him without batting an eye.

Less than a year ago, Finance Minister Peter Bethlenfalvy told weary Ontario taxpayers he would finally balance the province’s books in 2024-25.

The FAO report shows the Ford government will not meet that target. And the government isn’t just one year behind schedule: Ontarians shouldn’t expect a balanced budget until 2026-27.

Worse still, next year’s deficit is now projected to be larger than this year’s. That’s right: The numbers aren’t even heading in the right direction. This year’s $3.7-billion budget deficit will transform into $6.2-billion deficit next year.


The FAO says the Ford government will spend a total of $201.6 billion in the fiscal year ending March 31. That’s $43.1 billion larger than the spending tab Wynne racked up in 2018. In six years, Ford increased spending by $25 billion more than the rate of inflation.

This is a scathing indictment of the Ford government’s fiscal management. The same people who told Ontario taxpayers the Liberals were financially irresponsible have increased spending by an average of $4.2 billion more than the rate of inflation annually since taking office.

Let’s take a moment to go back to Wynne’s fiscal plan, released in 2018.

Wynne’s last budget projected government spending to be $182.2 billion in fiscal year 2023-24. The Ford government has overshot that target by $19.4 billion.


Some may say Wynne wouldn’t have kept to her targets and a Liberal government might have increased spending more rapidly than planned as well.

That may be true. But the same people who campaigned for office to restore the health of Ontario’s finances are making Wynne’s plans look like austerity.

How can Ontario get out of this mess?

First, the Ford government must order a top-to-bottom review of all government spending. Spending has increased by $25 billion more than the rate of inflation since 2018. There should be plenty of frills to cut back on.

Second, Ford can start getting tough with unions. Ontario government employees already enjoy a 10.9% wage premium. Ford shouldn’t sign one more bargaining deal that doesn’t start to close the government employee compensation gap.

Finally, Ford can stop corporate welfare. Over the past year, Ontario has handed $30 billion in corporate welfare to two multinational auto giants, among others. That must end.

Ford must get serious. Ontarians elected a bull in a china shop. It’s time for Ford to start acting like one.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Doug Ford wants to raise your gas bill
Ending the subsidy would be a win-win-win-win. There is, however, one loser – Enbridge Gas

Author of the article:peter Tabuns
Published Feb 14, 2024 • Last updated 19 hours ago • 3 minute read

Just before Christmas, the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) issued an important decision affecting the gas bills of nearly four million Ontario consumers.


The OEB ordered natural gas distributor Enbridge Gas to bear the costs of expanding its natural gas infrastructure, rather than imposing these costs on existing consumers.

The OEB decision acknowledged the obvious: At a time when Ontario is moving away from fossil fuels, any plan to expand natural gas infrastructure carries enormous risks — not just to the environment but to your pocketbook. And so, the OEB decided Enbridge’s proposal was not in the interests of consumers.

The next day the Doug Ford government announced that it would reverse the decision and protect the interests of Enbridge. It plans to pass legislation in February that will raise energy bills across the province and make life more expensive for new homebuyers.


It all goes back to a subsidy that most gas customers don’t even know they are paying. Right now, your gas bill includes a charge worth hundreds of millions of dollars each year to cover Enbridge’s cost of expanding gas pipelines into new developments. On Dec. 21, Ontario’s independent energy regulator decided to put a stop to this subsidy because it raises energy bills for existing gas customers and new homebuyers, while also increasing financial risks for the whole gas system.

Ending the subsidy would save gas customers more than $1 billion over four years in avoided pipeline subsidy costs, which comes to more than $300 per customer. Ending the subsidy will also encourage developers to install heat pumps in new homes, which provide much cheaper heating and cooling, instead of gas.


Ending the subsidy would be a win-win-win-win. It would lower energy bills for existing customers, lower energy bills for new homebuyers, lower carbon emissions, and avoid even more cost down the road when homes heated with natural gas convert to heat pumps.

There is, however, one loser – Enbridge Gas. It would lose millions of dollars in profits, and it is lobbying hard against the Energy Board decision.

It’s no surprise that Ford’s minister of Energy, Todd Smith, has announced that they will pass legislation to overturn the decision.

But gas is no longer the cheapest heating source. Investing in gas pipelines for heating is financially foolish because they will become obsolete and a massive cost to all current and future customers as we move away from gas heating.


The government’s own expert electrification panel noted “growing indications that it is unlikely that the natural gas grid can be decarbonized and continue to deliver cost-effective building heat.” Our neighbours, like New York State and Montreal, are prohibiting gas in new construction.

Passing legislation to reinstate a subsidy is completely out of step and risks financial disaster down the road.

The Ontario Energy Board made the right decision, based on evidence, to lower your energy bills. The Ontario government is on course to make the wrong decision, based on back-room lobbying, to raise your energy bills.

But over the years we’ve seen this government bend under public pressure and reverse decisions like opening parts of the Greenbelt for development.

Hopefully the evidence and the truth will prevail, the government will respect the independent decision of the Ontario Energy Board, and you will be protected from this rate increase.

— Peter Tabuns is the NDP MPP for Toronto-Danforth and is the party’s critic on energy and climate action
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Trudeau's ex Sophie Gregoire seen dining with new beau: Report
The estranged wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is dating Ottawa doctor Marcos Bettolli

Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Feb 14, 2024 • Last updated 21 hours ago • 2 minute read

Sophie Gregoire was seen dining with her new beau last weekend.


The estranged wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who is now dating Ottawa doctor Marcos Bettolli, enjoyed a meal at Yangtze restaurant in Ottawa’s Chinatown over the weekend with her children and two friends, according to Britain’s Daily Mail.


Last August, Trudeau and Gregoire announced their separation following 18 years of marriage. They have three children – Xavier, Ella-Grace, and Hadrien.

In October, it was reported that Gregoire moved in with her new love months before she and Trudeau announced their split.

Bettolli, 47, is an Argentinian-born pediatric surgeon at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa.

According to the Daily Mail, Bettolli’s condo has become a second home for Gregoire’s children. They recently spent two nights with her at his home.


Bettolli and his estranged wife Remonda, 46, are in a bitter divorce battle after their relationship ended in 2020. They have two children.

In a family court filing – dated April 23, 2023 – Remonda said her husband “has re-partnered with a high-profile individual who attracts significant media attention, and presents significant security considerations, to which the children are exposed while in their father’s care.”

She had concerns that Bettolli’s new relationship “may expose the girls to potential media scrutiny and/or security concerns” despite claiming she didn’t have an opinion on his personal life.


Bettolli responded in a June 1 filing that his wife’s perspective on his new relationship “is not in the children’s best interest” and claimed she threatened to move back to Argentina if his relationship with Gregoire was made public.

He also alleged his ex-wife “threatened to publish private intimate photos” of him after she accessed his personal computer files once she found out he was dating Gregoire.

In November, a temporary court order revealed the kids’ doc was required to pay $13,647 a month in child support, private school fees, and spousal support, while Remonda has to hand over $1,333 in child support to Bettolli, according to the Daily Mail.
 

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
9,120
2,113
113
New Brunswick
Putin makes Canada's embarrassing 'Nazi in parliament' story worldwide news
It’s hard to ignore the Russian president utilizing a Canadian story to justify his war


Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Feb 09, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

Just when embarrassed Canadians were starting to forget a former Nazi unit soldier getting a standing ovation in the House of Commons, along comes Vladimir Putin telling Tucker Carlson it’s one of the reasons Russia remains at war in Ukraine.


This was big news last September in Canada but what no one saw coming was that the Jaroslav Hunka affair would end up highlighted to the whole world in what is being called the most-watched interview of all time.


In fact, Putin used the incident in Parliament with the 98-year-old former Waffen SS soldier – invited by Speaker of the House Anthony Rota to attend the address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy – as one of his justifications for continued prosecution of bloody war in Ukraine.

While saying he understands Ukrainians are entitled to be a “separate people,” he believes “not on the basis of Nazism.”

When independent journalist Carlson challenged Putin by saying, “Hitler has been dead for 80 years,” the long-serving Russian leader called Carlson’s question “pesky and subtle” while seizing the moment to add his version of history to an already lengthy 30-minute history lesson on Russia.


“You say Hitler has been dead for so many years,” Putin said through a translator. “But his example lives on. The people who exterminated the Jews, Russians and Poles are still alive. And the president, the current president of today’s Ukraine, applauds him in the Canadian Parliament … can we say that we have completely uprooted his ideology?”

He was referring to Hunka being cheered by members of Parliament.


“The Canadian parliament introduced the man who, as the speaker of the parliament said, fought against the Russians during World War Two. Well, who fought against the Russians during World War One? Hitler and his accomplices,” said Putin. “And it turned out that this man served in the SS troops.”

Putin made the point that Hitler’s “SS troops consisted of Ukrainian nationalists who did this dirty work” and “the President of Ukraine stood up with the entire Parliament of Canada and applauded this man. How can this be imagined?”


It did happen and MP Rota was the fall guy.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who Friday told The Canadian Press that Putin “will use whatever propaganda he can” to try to justify the war, did apologize to Zelenskyy in September for the terrible misstep. But when the dust settled, it was Rota taking the blame.



Rota resigned as the speaker for being the one who invited Hunka, a constituent from his Nipissing riding. Even Friday, just 16 hours after the Carlson interview dropped on Elon Musk’s X platform, the Prime Minister’s office re-iterated that Trudeau played no role in the invitation to Hunka.


“The Prime Minister had no knowledge of this individual before the independent recognition by the former Speaker of the House of Commons,” spokesperson Mohammad Hussain said.



“Last September, there was a community event with the President of Ukraine in Toronto with over 1,000 people invited. Hundreds of Canadians were invited upon the recommendation of groups like the Ukrainian Canadian Congress,” Hussain said. “The individual in question’s name was submitted by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. The individual did not attend. Knowing what is known now – the individual shouldn’t have been invited.”

While Opposition Leader Pierre Poilievre showed an actual invitation from the PMO, the Trudeau government was still insisting on Friday that the Prime Minister knew nothing about it.



Whether this was all an accident or a misunderstanding, it’s a moot point now that Putin has chosen to exploit it.



I was surprised about how little mainstream media coverage this received. But it’s hard to ignore Putin utilizing a Canadian story to justify his war.



“What we see happening today, that is what de-Nazification is in our understanding,” said Putin. “We have to get rid of these people who maintain this concept and support this practice to try to prevent it.”

Whether or not you agree with Putin, one fact that is indisputable is that hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians and Russians are reported to have died or been wounded in this deadly conflict.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
https://twitter.com/TPostMillennial/status/1755747274490007573?ref_src=twsrc^tfw|twcamp^tweetembed|twterm^1755747274490007573|twgr^c3ff5f2111386fd67a2e2e566fc0f2863d2dbaa9|twcon^s1_&ref_url=https://torontosun.com/news/national/warmington-putin-made-canadas-embarrassing-nazi-in-parliament-story-worldwide-news

Yes, because Putin is a font of Truth and Goodness.

Anyone who sides with him needs to STFU. Putin is more like Hitler and the Nazi's than Zelenskky, or Canada for that matter.

As for the Hunka issue... again, STFU. Look into the actual history of the unit he was part of, his time in it, and the fact the Brits AND Canada looked into him and neither country at the time held him suggests this is just a story Putin and his people on both sides of the Atlantic are trying to push to make excuses for Ukraine.

It does not diminish the words he said that day for Ukraine, that EVERY PERSON in the House applauded.

Tuk Tuk and Putin are both authoritarian wackadoo's that need to be ignored.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,828
7,090
113
B.C.
Yes, because Putin is a font of Truth and Goodness.

Anyone who sides with him needs to STFU. Putin is more like Hitler and the Nazi's than Zelenskky, or Canada for that matter.

As for the Hunka issue... again, STFU. Look into the actual history of the unit he was part of, his time in it, and the fact the Brits AND Canada looked into him and neither country at the time held him suggests this is just a story Putin and his people on both sides of the Atlantic are trying to push to make excuses for Ukraine.

It does not diminish the words he said that day for Ukraine, that EVERY PERSON in the House applauded.

Tuk Tuk and Putin are both authoritarian wackadoo's that need to be ignored.
So the PMO did not invite him to Parliment ?
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,960
1,800
113
I detest Trudeau and make it clear that I don't like him but I would never abuse a company that simply "hosted" a campaign event. One has nothing to do with the other & it's truly unfortunate. It reflects badly on all of us who disagree with Liberal policies & dislike their leader. Their hatred towards Trudeau is much like the hatred of Trump which is truly unfortunate.
If I owned a restaurant or similar business, I would have to think long and hard about hosting an event for a politician I oppose. This is not the same as feeding the PM as a customer, rather it is a political statement.
That being said, the hatred being directed to the business and the faking reviews is just plain wrong. Just simply avoid the place, and make sure the owners know why. Much like people did with Budweiser's gay beer.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,960
1,800
113
Doug Ford wants to raise your gas bill
Ending the subsidy would be a win-win-win-win. There is, however, one loser – Enbridge Gas

Author of the article:peter Tabuns
Published Feb 14, 2024 • Last updated 19 hours ago • 3 minute read

Just before Christmas, the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) issued an important decision affecting the gas bills of nearly four million Ontario consumers.


The OEB ordered natural gas distributor Enbridge Gas to bear the costs of expanding its natural gas infrastructure, rather than imposing these costs on existing consumers.

The OEB decision acknowledged the obvious: At a time when Ontario is moving away from fossil fuels, any plan to expand natural gas infrastructure carries enormous risks — not just to the environment but to your pocketbook. And so, the OEB decided Enbridge’s proposal was not in the interests of consumers.

The next day the Doug Ford government announced that it would reverse the decision and protect the interests of Enbridge. It plans to pass legislation in February that will raise energy bills across the province and make life more expensive for new homebuyers.


It all goes back to a subsidy that most gas customers don’t even know they are paying. Right now, your gas bill includes a charge worth hundreds of millions of dollars each year to cover Enbridge’s cost of expanding gas pipelines into new developments. On Dec. 21, Ontario’s independent energy regulator decided to put a stop to this subsidy because it raises energy bills for existing gas customers and new homebuyers, while also increasing financial risks for the whole gas system.

Ending the subsidy would save gas customers more than $1 billion over four years in avoided pipeline subsidy costs, which comes to more than $300 per customer. Ending the subsidy will also encourage developers to install heat pumps in new homes, which provide much cheaper heating and cooling, instead of gas.


Ending the subsidy would be a win-win-win-win. It would lower energy bills for existing customers, lower energy bills for new homebuyers, lower carbon emissions, and avoid even more cost down the road when homes heated with natural gas convert to heat pumps.

There is, however, one loser – Enbridge Gas. It would lose millions of dollars in profits, and it is lobbying hard against the Energy Board decision.

It’s no surprise that Ford’s minister of Energy, Todd Smith, has announced that they will pass legislation to overturn the decision.

But gas is no longer the cheapest heating source. Investing in gas pipelines for heating is financially foolish because they will become obsolete and a massive cost to all current and future customers as we move away from gas heating.


The government’s own expert electrification panel noted “growing indications that it is unlikely that the natural gas grid can be decarbonized and continue to deliver cost-effective building heat.” Our neighbours, like New York State and Montreal, are prohibiting gas in new construction.

Passing legislation to reinstate a subsidy is completely out of step and risks financial disaster down the road.

The Ontario Energy Board made the right decision, based on evidence, to lower your energy bills. The Ontario government is on course to make the wrong decision, based on back-room lobbying, to raise your energy bills.

But over the years we’ve seen this government bend under public pressure and reverse decisions like opening parts of the Greenbelt for development.

Hopefully the evidence and the truth will prevail, the government will respect the independent decision of the Ontario Energy Board, and you will be protected from this rate increase.

— Peter Tabuns is the NDP MPP for Toronto-Danforth and is the party’s critic on energy and climate action
Its OntariOWE, so no one else really cares.
Also there is a lot of misinformation in that story.
 

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
9,120
2,113
113
New Brunswick


Here's a shocker for some.

On the issue of NATO, and the military, I agree with PP.

The how of the money is what concerns me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ron in Regina

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,316
3,110
113
Toronto family who unknowingly employed war criminal fears nothing has changed
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mia Rabson
Published Feb 19, 2024 • 5 minute read

OTTAWA — Almost 30 years ago, Gail Bocknek turned on the evening news and watched dumbfounded as a man who had worked for her family for decades was identified as a Nazi war criminal.


Bocknek, the daughter of European Jews who had many extended family members die in the Holocaust, felt sick.


“I was just glad that my parents didn’t live to see this,” Bocknek said in a recent interview.

The stomach-churning memories of that day resurfaced for Bocknek last fall when Canadian parliamentarians of all stripes unknowingly applauded a man who had fought with a Nazi unit in Ukraine.

And they resurfaced once again earlier this month when the Liberal government agreed to declassify 15 more pages from a 1985 report on Canada’s less-than-flattering history of allowing former Nazis into Canada and failing to prosecute or deport them when their crimes came to light.

Bocknek said although decades have passed, she is not convinced anything has changed. She has little confidence that Canada’s current laws are sufficient to keep out people who committed atrocities overseas.


“I’m just saying that they’ve got to be accountable and they have to protect us,” she said.

Bocknek said she was about six years old when her parents hired a housekeeper, Emma Tobiass, who became a fixture in their lives. Emma’s husband, Erichs Tobiass, was employed as a mechanic for a car dealership but also worked for the family regularly doing odd jobs and house sitting.

“They came and stayed with my brother and I when my parents were out of town,” she recalls.

When Bocknek married and had children of her own, Erichs and Emma Tobiass continued to work for her family as well, including looking after her children.

Bocknek said he was never a “warm man” but was also never cruel.

Then in March 1995 Bocknek was watching a dinner hour newscast and saw a report that Canada was trying to revoke the citizenships of four men believed to have been Nazi collaborators.


Bocknek heard the name Erichs Tobiass, but no photo ran with the segment, leaving her unsure if the report referred to the man she knew.

She frantically called the TV station looking for more details, to no avail. At 11 p.m. they watched the news again and this time there was a photo.

“And it was Erichs,” said Bocknek.

She said the first thing she did was go out to the front of her house where some lilies Erichs had planted for them still grew. She pulled them all out and “threw them into the ravine.”

Soon after she tried to call him, looking for answers.

“He wouldn’t come to the phone,” she said.

“This lady answered, and I said, ‘I would just like you to ask Erichs one question.; And she said, ‘what?’ And I said, ‘Would he have killed my brother and I?’


All Bocknek got in response was a click as the woman hung up the phone.

While the family had no idea about his true identity, the Canadian government did — and had for nearly 30 years.

In 1966, Tobiass was on a list of six alleged war criminals from Latvia provided to the Canadian government by Simon Wiesenthal, a Holocaust survivor who dedicated his life to tracking down Nazi war criminals.

A 1995 report on Tobiass’s case said documents show Canada refused to meet with Wiesenthal about the list.

Tobiass was alleged to have been part of a Nazi commando unit with the Latvian Auxiliary Security Police, which stands accused of murdering as many as 30,000 Jews between 1941 and 1943.

He moved to Canada in the 1950s and became a citizen in 1957, settling in Toronto.


Bocknek said she never got any indication of that history from either Erichs or Emma.

“You know they never had children, and Erichs said to my brother and I when we went to (her) funeral that Emma always thought of us as her kids, and we sort of knew that. That’s how she looked after us,” said Bocknek.

Canada was among many western countries that admitted thousands of Nazi war criminals in the years after the Second World War, even as many countries, including Canada, were rejecting Jewish asylum seekers.

Immigration Minister Marc Miller said it is clear Canada’s history on this front is “shameful.”

“It was easier to come in as a war criminal than it was as a Jew,” he said in an interview.

Canada began taking steps to confront that history in the mid-1980s, holding a commission of inquiry known as the Deschenes Commission to look at how so many war criminals had ended up as Canadians.


That commission identified more than 800 people possibly living in Canada with ties to the Nazis, with 29 meriting special attention by the government.

While parts of that report have been released publicly, there are still many pages that have not, including the list of names. It remains unclear exactly how many were ever investigated.

The Justice Department’s war crimes unit, created after the Deschenes Commission released its findings, said in 2002 it had attempted to prosecute or deport 18 people, but only two had actually left the country. At least half of that number died before their cases concluded.

In 1987 Canada changed the Criminal Code to allow war criminals to be prosecuted in Canada for crimes overseas. But the first prosecutions failed after one defendant successfully argued he had just been following orders.


Canada decided in 1995 it would move to try and deport suspected war criminals if prosecutions wouldn’t work. Tobiass was one of the first four people informed in the winter of 1995 that his citizenship was being reviewed.

Legal wranglings delayed the case for years and he died in 1997 at the age of 86.

Other cases lingered in the courts for decades, including that of Helmut Oberlander, one of the three men Canada tried to deport along with Tobiass.

A judge concluded in 2000 that Oberlander had failed to disclose his wartime activities when he applied for citizenship in 1953. Canada revoked his citizenship for the first of several times in 2008.

The case remained in the courts for more than another decade as Oberlander fought the various revocation decisions. He died in Waterloo, Ont. in 2021 at the age of 97, still a Canadian citizen.


Bocknek said she has no confidence that Canada is properly checking on the histories of those it admits, even today.

“People lie on their citizenship applications all the time,” she said.

Miller said the system is better but agreed it is not perfect.

“The security situation in Canada today is radically different than it was then,” he said.

“But it doesn’t mean that it is airtight.”

He said Canada unsuccessfully tried to revoke the citizenship of someone accused of war crimes in the former Yugoslavia as recently as January.

“So these things do happen. I’m not naive enough to suggest to you that this doesn’t happen anymore. But the way we do triage today with biometrics and background checks and the extensive information that we require from people coming into Canada … is much more extensive than it was in the late ’40s or throughout the ’50s and even ’60s.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,267
11,779
113
Low Earth Orbit
“So these things do happen. I’m not naive enough to suggest to you that this doesn’t happen anymore. But the way we do triage today with biometrics and background checks and the extensive information that we require from people coming into Canada … is much more extensive than it was in the late ’40s or throughout the ’50s and even ’60s.”
Dreaming...