Trudeau’s Newest New Carbon Tax

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Which language will they be in?
Even if it’s English, would you recognize the English language of 2100? It might be the difference between Chaucer and Shakespeare. It’s anyone’s guess though.

Whatever language is being spoken, will these people be able to legally grow a tomato at home? Will they be able to travel more than 25 miles (40kms) from their home? Will they live in apartments the size of my bathroom? Will they be able to afford to own a dog?
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Even if it’s English, would you recognize the English language of 2100? It might be the difference between Chaucer and Shakespeare. It’s anyone’s guess though.

Whatever language is being spoken, will these people be able to legally grow a tomato at home? Will they be able to travel more than 25 miles (40kms) from their home? Will they live in apartments the size of my bathroom? Will they be able to afford to own a dog?
Sounds aboot Reich too me.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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Why would he know that , or even care ? He has a world to save after all .
A legacy to build, to prove we’re all wrong on everything that he doesn’t ideologically subscribe to.
1710384487166.jpegJustin Trudeau had a message for anyone expecting a U-turn on the carbon tax at his press conference in Calgary: “You turn if you want to, this Liberal’s not for turning.”
The prime minister was asked what he would say to people who don’t buy what he is saying on the carbon tax. With a messianic glint in his eye, he took the next seven minutes to metaphorically wag his finger at his critics.
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He said it is a stressful time of inflation, wars that are causing emotional angst, and uncertainties caused by the hangover from the pandemic…& the better part of a decade of Liberal mismanagement where the budgets just didn’t balance themselves…

Another challenge is climate change, which he said should be apparent to Albertans since the provincial government declared an early start to wildfire season in February. “The impact of climate change is real,” he said.
To tackle the problem, the federal government has options, he said: regulation or incentives, subsidies and rewards.
“But they all involve the heavy hand of government. I prefer a cleaner solution, a market-based solution and that is, if you’re behaving in a way that causes pollution, you should pay,” he said.
“My job is not to be popular — although it helps — my job is to do the right thing for Canadians a generation from now.”
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Firstly, many Canadians have stopped listening to Trudeau: they just tune him out after eight long years of overexposure. His approval rating is at a near low of 32 per cent and is still sliding, according to a new Angus Reid Institute poll (43 per cent of respondents say their opinion of him has “worsened” in recent weeks, including among past Liberal and NDP voters).
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Secondly, poll after poll shows that the issue dominating the mindset of voters is the cost of living, and whatever the Liberals call the carbon tax rebate (it has been re-branded as the Canada Carbon Rebate), a plurality of voters believe the carbon tax makes life more unaffordable, without significantly reducing emissions. As Angus Reid Institute president Shachi Kurl put it, the next election will be a “single issue for swing voters” unless they start to feel some relief in their pocketbooks.
Furey is the seventh premier calling on Trudeau to halt the increase, joining premiers in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston also sent Trudeau a letter on Tuesday, calling the increase "unfair and misguided."

So…that would make eight…at this point.
So…BC & Quebec are on their own tangents…so that leaves what? Manitoba & the Territories I Guess?
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Taxslave2

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Except for the Liberals and Justin and especially Steven.
They're not doing it for us.
They're doing it for future generations.
Don't ask me what they're doing.
Because it doesn't reduce carbon pollution.

But it will shift the pollution out of the country. A cap on oil production will shift jobs to third world countries. The terminally stupid will soon demand we stop mining when they find out their electric car batteries cause pollution in Canada. It is OK to have all this happen in other countries. Out of sight, out of mind.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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But it will shift the pollution out of the country. A cap on oil production will shift jobs to third world countries. The terminally stupid will soon demand we stop mining when they find out their electric car batteries cause pollution in Canada. It is OK to have all this happen in other countries. Out of sight, out of mind.
Electric cars arent the future.
 
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IdRatherBeSkiing

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May 28, 2007
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Except for the Liberals and Justin and especially Steven.
They're not doing it for us.
They're doing it for future generations.
Don't ask me what they're doing.
Because it doesn't reduce carbon pollution.

IF Canadians actually had the power to affect climate, and you believe CO2 is the primary cause of climate change, what he says actually makes sense (and he explains it well). BUT we only contribute 1.5% of the world's CO2 so biting a bullet ourselves when nobody else is does not make any sense.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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IF Canadians actually had the power to affect climate, and you believe CO2 is the primary cause of climate change, what he says actually makes sense (and he explains it well). BUT we only contribute 1.5% of the world's CO2 so biting a bullet ourselves when nobody else is does not make any sense.
Canada’s deciduous forests would consume several times our 1.5% alone… let along anything else we’re doing like seasonal crops that would soak up carbon dioxide like thirsty sponges, so this whole carbon tax bullshit is an exercise in self-flagellation at best…with a huge landmass & it’s comparatively small population living in an Arctic or Sub-Arctic climatic zone north of the 49th parallel.

If we “really” wanted to make a difference globally, we’d be exporting natural gas to the “emerging countries” & “3rd World countries” running on coal fired electrical generation so hard & fast it would make your head spin…but are we?

That along tells me this is more about politics and control and posturing than anything else…as opposed to actual trying to change anything climate wise anyway, & not just the banning plastic straws on the prairies to save the spotted (inner-Continental?) whales when the closest ocean to where I sit (not counting Hudson Bay, which is debated as being part of both the Atlantic and Arctic oceans) is probably the one ocean I never want to visit anyway.

I’ve just done a quick Google & come up with this:
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How many times does 1.5% go into 11%?
 

Tecumsehsbones

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IF Canadians actually had the power to affect climate, and you believe CO2 is the primary cause of climate change, what he says actually makes sense (and he explains it well). BUT we only contribute 1.5% of the world's CO2 so biting a bullet ourselves when nobody else is does not make any sense.
I certainly think the whole carbon tax game is about as FUBAR as it gets. But with regard to whether Canada could or should do anything, I guess it comes down to do you do what's right because it's right, or because other people are doing it too?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,137
7,993
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Regina, Saskatchewan
I certainly think the whole carbon tax game is about as FUBAR as it gets. But with regard to whether Canada could or should do anything, I guess it comes down to do you do what's right because it's right, or because other people are doing it too?
I think it comes down to, should we be doing something for the sake of doing something (?) or should we do something actually effective that might actually make a difference if that’s actually the goal of the global climate changey objective?

Banning plastic shopping bags and cutlery vs actually impacting global coal fired electrical generation are two very different things with potentially different outcomes.

Fully electric cars & heat pumps replacing ICE vehicles & natural gas furnaces in our climate & geographically spread out nation just doesn’t make sense to me as actual being on the ground here, in the transportation industry, actually moving things place to place, and living through my 55th winter here (with a minor background in plumbing also).
 

Retired_Can_Soldier

The End of the Dog is Coming!
Mar 19, 2006
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I certainly think the whole carbon tax game is about as FUBAR as it gets. But with regard to whether Canada could or should do anything, I guess it comes down to do you do what's right because it's right, or because other people are doing it too?
They, the government, haven't done anything but virtue signal and pick our pockets.
 
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