The plan to ‘reawaken’ cryogenically frozen brains and transplant them

darkbeaver

the universe is electric
Jan 26, 2006
41,035
197
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RR1 Distopia 666 Discordia
My brain is abuzz with what it would be like to awaken in someone else' body...looking into a mirror would cause such mental dissonance.

not to mention what it might be like for someone to see a loved one whom died walking around with someone else inside!

__________________

The plan to ‘reawaken’ cryogenically frozen brains and transplant them into someone else’s skull

Sergio Canavero, the Italian surgeon who audaciously plans to perform the world’s first human head transplant within the next 10 months (pending the availability of a donor body) is now preparing to reawaken cryogenically frozen brains and transplant them into someone else’s skull.

In an interview with a German-language magazine, Canavero says he will attempt to bring the first brains frozen in liquid nitrogen at an Arizona-based cryogenics bank back to life “not in 100 years,” but three years at the latest.

Transplanting a brain only — and not an entire head — gets around formidable rejection issues, Canavero said, since there will be no need to reconnect and stitch up severed vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles as there is when a new head is fused onto a brain-dead donor body.

Canavero allows that one “problematic” issue with brain transplants, however, would be that “no aspect of your original external body remains the same.”

“Your head is no longer there, your brain is transplanted into an entirely different skull,” he told OOOM magazine, published by the same company that handles the Italian brain surgeon’s public relations.


The flamboyant neuroscientist who some ethicists have decried as “nuts” rattled the transplant world when he first outlined his plans for a human head transplant two years ago in the journal, Surgical Neurology International.

The greatest technical hurdle to a head transplant is fusing the donor and recipient’s severed spinal cords, something never before achieved in humans, and restoring function, without causing massive, irreversible brain damage or death.

In an exclusive interview with the National Post last year, Canavero said what makes his brazen, and critics say ethically reckless, protocol possible is a special “fusogen,” a waxy, glue-like substance developed by a young B.C.-born chemist that will be used to reconnect the severed spinal cord stumps and coax axons and neurons to regrow across the gap.

Canavero said the first head transplant will be performed in Harbin, China, and the surgical team led by Xiaoping Ren, a Chinese orthopedic surgeon who participated in the first hand transplant in the U.S. in 1999. Ren has been performing hundreds of head transplants in mice in preparation.

The first patient will be an unidentified Chinese citizen, and not, as originally planned, Valery Spirdonov, a 31-year-old Russian man who suffers from a rare and devastating form of spinal muscular dystrophy.

Canavero called Ren “a close friend of mine and an extraordinarily capable surgeon.”

“At the moment, I can only disclose that there has been massive progress in medical experiments that would have seemed impossible even as recently as a few months ago,” Canavero told OOOM. “The milestones that have been reached will undoubtedly revolutionize medicine.”

He declined to offer up exactly what those milestones are, saying that results of the most recent animal experiments have been submitted for publication in “renowned scientific medical journals.”

Last September, the team reported they had succeeded in restoring functionality and mobility in mice with severed spinal cords using the special fusogen, dubbed Texas-PEG. Canavero claims the mice were able to run again.

He said numerous experiments have been conducted since then on an array of different animals in South Korea and China “and the results are unambiguous: the spinal cord — and with it the ability to move — can be entirely restored,” he told OOOM.

Canavero envisions the head (or, perhaps more accurately, body) grafting venture as a cure for people living with horrible medical conditions. The plan is to cut off the head of two people — one, the recipient, the other, the donor whose brain is dead but whose body is otherwise healthy, an accident victim for example. Surgeons will then shift the recipient’s head onto the donor body using a custom-made swivel crane. They will have less than an hour to re-establish blood supply before risking irreversible brain damage.

“In a few months we will sever a body from a head in an unprecedented medical procedure,” Canavero said. At the moment of decapitation, the patient will be clinically dead. “If we bring this person back to life, we will receive the first real account of what actually happens after death,” he told the magazine, meaning, he said, “whether there is an afterlife, a heaven, a hereafter or whatever you may want to call it or whether death is simply a flicking off of the light switch and that’s it.”

Canavero said a brain transplant has several advantages over a head-swap, including that there is “barely any immune reaction, which means the problem of rejection does not exist. The brain is, in a manner of speaking, a neutral organ,” he said.

Others are hugely skeptical of the prospect of reawakening brains, or bodies, frozen after death. In an interview with the Post’s Joe O’Connor two years ago, Eike-Henner Kluge, a bio-ethicist at the University of Victoria, refers to cryonics patients as “corpsesicles.”

“Unless it is technically possible, and it is not, to replace all the water left in a body’s cells with glycol, unfreezing a frozen corpse will rupture the cell walls ensuring that you are mush — a corpsesicle.”

However, two years ago researchers with 21st Century Medicine, a California cryobiology research company, reported they had succeeded in freezing a rabbit’s brain using a flash-freezing technique to protect and stabilize the tissue. After the vitrified brains were rewarmed, electron microscope imaging from across the rabbit brains showed neurons and synapses were crisp and intact.

Canavero hopes to get his first brains from Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Scottsdale, Ariz. Alcor’s most famous “patient” is Red Sox baseball legend Ted Williams, the greatest hitter in baseball history, whose head was detached from his body and cryopreserved after his death at 83 in 2002.

The plan to

These people were fools, thier brains are cat food thier mind has moved along.
 

darkbeaver

the universe is electric
Jan 26, 2006
41,035
197
63
RR1 Distopia 666 Discordia
well I guess we'll find out if conciousness is an organic thing or a mystical other worldy thing.

We already know, there is the material and the spark, and the union=life, infinite form, God is perfecting an obediant servent irrespective of the number of limbs or tentacles. Us humans are competing against hordes of microbes and adjusting heavenly bodies. We bean here a long long time, we'll be OK if we get up with the Sun, at least try, thats when the light is best.


Yes, Glasshoppah.

Old TV wisdom.

Kung Fool wasn't it?
 

Twila

Nanah Potato
Mar 26, 2003
14,698
73
48
We already know, there is the material and the spark, and the union=life, infinite form, God is perfecting an obediant servent irrespective of the number of limbs or tentacles. Us humans are competing against hordes of microbes and adjusting heavenly bodies. We bean here a long long time, we'll be OK if we get up with the Sun, at least try, thats when the light is best.


:roll:
 

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
37,070
3
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We already know, there is the material and the spark, and the union=life, infinite form, God is perfecting an obediant servent irrespective of the number of limbs or tentacles. Us humans are competing against hordes of microbes and adjusting heavenly bodies. We bean here a long long time, we'll be OK if we get up with the Sun, at least try, thats when the light is best.




Old TV wisdom.

Kung Fool wasn't it?

Au so!
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Maybe we could fight ISIS by using PETA against them?
Already did.

Three Islamic State militants setting up an ambush in a bitterly contested area of northern Iraq were killed by a herd of stampeding boars, local leaders say.
Sheikh Anwar al-Assi, a chief of the local Ubaid tribe and supervisor of anti-ISIS forces, told The Times of London the militants were hiding on the edge of a field about 50 miles southwest of Kirkuk when the boars overwhelmed them Sunday. Five other militants were injured, al-Assi said. He said the group was poised to attack a band of local tribesmen who had fled to nearby mountains since militants seized the town of Hawija three years ago.
“It is likely their movement disturbed a herd of wild pigs, which inhabit the area as well as the nearby cornfields,” he said.
Al-Assi said the militants had summarily executed 25 people attempting to flee the militant's would-be caliphate in the three days before the boars attacked. Hawija, about 100 miles south of Mosul, sees dozens of residents flee to Kurdish Kirkuk daily, and the Iraqi military has planned to launch an offensive in the region after a laborious effort to liberate Mosul is completed.


https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...ic-state-position-kill-3-militants/100876844/


Pretty ironic.
 

Twila

Nanah Potato
Mar 26, 2003
14,698
73
48
Already did.

Three Islamic State militants setting up an ambush in a bitterly contested area of northern Iraq were killed by a herd of stampeding boars, local leaders say.
Sheikh Anwar al-Assi, a chief of the local Ubaid tribe and supervisor of anti-ISIS forces, told The Times of London the militants were hiding on the edge of a field about 50 miles southwest of Kirkuk when the boars overwhelmed them Sunday. Five other militants were injured, al-Assi said. He said the group was poised to attack a band of local tribesmen who had fled to nearby mountains since militants seized the town of Hawija three years ago.
“It is likely their movement disturbed a herd of wild pigs, which inhabit the area as well as the nearby cornfields,” he said.
Al-Assi said the militants had summarily executed 25 people attempting to flee the militant's would-be caliphate in the three days before the boars attacked. Hawija, about 100 miles south of Mosul, sees dozens of residents flee to Kurdish Kirkuk daily, and the Iraqi military has planned to launch an offensive in the region after a laborious effort to liberate Mosul is completed.


https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...ic-state-position-kill-3-militants/100876844/


Pretty ironic.

Maybe it's time to train the wild boars...they seem to be great fighters.