Shepherd's Pie

#juan

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Aug 30, 2005
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Made this last night for the first time in years:

Ingredients


Sauce
a pound of lean ground round
one tablespoon olive oil
one medium onion chopped
one clove of garlic crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
pepper to taste
one cup diced carrots
1 1/2 cups good beef stock
2 teaspoons flour

four large potatoes peeled and coarsely diced
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup milk

Brown beef in olive oil. Add the rest of the sauce ingredients and simmer for twenty five minutes

Boil potatoes until soft....drain and mash with butter and milk.

Meanwhile pour meat sauce into appropriately sized baking dish.
Spread potatoes smoothly on top and bake at 400 degrees for forty minutes.
Remove from oven for five minutes and serve with a nice salad

Enjoy!
 

AnnaG

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Jul 5, 2009
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I make Sunshine on the Mountains sometimes. It is basically shepherd's pie except I add more garlic, some corn niblets, chopped celery, a can of cream of mushroom soup or just mushrooms, some rosemary, thyme, a bay leaf, and some cayenne. And the meat was not always beef. I do not spread the mushed spuds out but leave them in lumps on top of the meat concoction and sprinkle grated cheddar (extra sharp) on top of the lumps. The kids loved it.
 

DaSleeper

Trolling Hypocrites
May 27, 2007
33,257
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Northern Ontario,
In Quebec they call it Pâté chinois and they add green peas and kernel corn to the mixture...
My wife adds her own touch by using sweet potatoes instead of regular ones then shredded cheese on top in the last 5 minutes in the oven...
Now I'm getting hungry.....:lol:
 

#juan

Hall of Fame Member
Aug 30, 2005
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I make Sunshine on the Mountains sometimes. It is basically shepherd's pie except I add more garlic, some corn niblets, chopped celery, a can of cream of mushroom soup or just mushrooms, some rosemary, thyme, a bay leaf, and some cayenne. And the meat was not always beef. I do not spread the mushed spuds out but leave them in lumps on top of the meat concoction and sprinkle grated cheddar (extra sharp) on top of the lumps. The kids loved it.

By all means, add whatever you like. Green peas are good and so is chopped celery. Chopped mushrooms are good as well. I don't think I've made it rhe same way twice.
 

talloola

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 14, 2006
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Vancouver Island
I also make a different variation

ground beef mixture on bottom, pour vegetable soup,(healthy request), mixed with small amount of my homemade
spaghetti sauce, for a better flavour,over top of meat, and spread carefully, and finish with mashed potatoes, whipped smooth,
or not, to taste.
 

Walter

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Jan 28, 2007
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Shepherd's
 

darkbeaver

the universe is electric
Jan 26, 2006
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RR1 Distopia 666 Discordia
I make Sunshine on the Mountains sometimes. It is basically shepherd's pie except I add more garlic, some corn niblets, chopped celery, a can of cream of mushroom soup or just mushrooms, some rosemary, thyme, a bay leaf, and some cayenne. And the meat was not always beef. I do not spread the mushed spuds out but leave them in lumps on top of the meat concoction and sprinkle grated cheddar (extra sharp) on top of the lumps. The kids loved it.

That's pretty artistic grub. I hope u film it before fork it out. It looks delishious. I got to have the potatoes evenly spread, 1 inch no more no less and it must be brown and it must have chicken and parsnips butter and garlic all the way through. I made maccaroni and cheeze today, old chedder, something went wrong, it's not criticle but it's not my best work. I can still eat it but the thrill is gone. Nice recipe Juan.
 

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
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Catching and killing a tasty and well marbled shepherd has often presented a problem but we've always found a way.
 

Twila

Nanah Potato
Mar 26, 2003
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I make Sunshine on the Mountains sometimes. It is basically shepherd's pie except I add more garlic, some corn niblets, chopped celery, a can of cream of mushroom soup or just mushrooms, some rosemary, thyme, a bay leaf, and some cayenne. And the meat was not always beef. I do not spread the mushed spuds out but leave them in lumps on top of the meat concoction and sprinkle grated cheddar (extra sharp) on top of the lumps. The kids loved it.


yummy, that sounds awesome.

I also make a variation and we call it whohash. Lots of garlic, creamed corn. I make the ground game super garlic-y and add chili's for a bit of heat. I like for the meat to have lots of flavour on the bottom layer and then a half inch of creamed corn. Last layer of mashed potatoes is made super creamy. Lastly I grate some extra old cheddar or smoked gouda or a mix of extra old cheddar and real parmesan cheese.

Always cooked for my girls. Never cared much for the shepards pie but did make a might fine tamale pie and Mexican lasagna. They loved it.

Could you share your tamale and mexican lasagna recipe? I'm in the need for some more good recipes and love tamales.

Catching and killing a tasty and well marbled shepherd has often presented a problem but we've always found a way.

LOL. just not alot of shepherds around anymore. Over hunted probably.
 

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
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LOL. just not alot of shepherds around anymore. Over hunted probably.

It's a baaaaad way to earn a living, I'm told.
 

Twila

Nanah Potato
Mar 26, 2003
14,698
73
48
LOL. just not alot of shepherds around anymore. Over hunted probably.

It's a baaaaad way to earn a living, I'm told.

farming? There are some whom seem to be slowly turning away from industrial farming and are doing more family style farming and their are many city and urban folks who are happy to help support them. At least around here there is.

It would be nice if our diets weren't so meat centric or soy centric. There are all kinds of veg that we no longer grow and eat. There are many types of grains that are just no longer popular. Wheat and soy seem to have taken over and become a thing for profit. Not just a living, but for profits in increasing quantities.
 

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
37,070
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farming? There are some whom seem to be slowly turning away from industrial farming and are doing more family style farming and their are many city and urban folks who are happy to help support them. At least around here there is.

It would be nice if our diets weren't so meat centric or soy centric. There are all kinds of veg that we no longer grow and eat. There are many types of grains that are just no longer popular. Wheat and soy seem to have taken over and become a thing for profit. Not just a living, but for profits in increasing quantities.

I've helped out some friends in the Ottawa Valley many years ago by tendng their sheep so that they could take much needed vacation. They had miscalculated the gestation of their herd and they came home to a barn full of lambs (none of the ewes or lambs "bought it" ... Pure dumb luck on my part).

Anyway, having been involved with them over a couple of years and having dragged dead sheep to their burial ground, I would say that the damn things croak too easily. Lung worm, is one of their afflictions but they seem to have a long list of things that git them. I can't imagine how my Celt ancestors survived the Bronze age by raising those things.
 

Twila

Nanah Potato
Mar 26, 2003
14,698
73
48
I've helped out some friends in the Ottawa Valley many years ago by tendng their sheep so that they could take much needed vacation. They had miscalculated the gestation of their herd and they came home to a barn full of lambs (none of the ewes or lambs "bought it" ... Pure dumb luck on my part).

Anyway, having been involved with them over a couple of years and having dragged dead sheep to their burial ground, I would say that the damn things croak too easily. Lung worm, is one of their afflictions but they seem to have a long list of things that git them. I can't imagine how my Celt ancestors survived the Bronze age by raising those things.

your ancestors didn't only raise sheep. They'd have goats too. Goats are good for milk, meat, and to keep your other flocks healthy. Sheep are not long lived but then again the breeds back in the day were hardy, less meaty, less wooly, healthier and stronger.

The sheep and cows would not have been as docile as those we have today. The docile animal is great for industrial farming but not great for getting along on their own.