Refugee/Migrant Crisis

Ron in Regina

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spaminator

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As StatsCan shows immigration soaring, is it time for pause?
Pace of newcomers arriving appears to be outstripping job creation amid a housing crisis.


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Sep 08, 2023 • 3 minute read
In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.
In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.
Have we reached an immigration tipping point in Canada? Figures released by Statistics Canada on Friday definitely point in that direction.


In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.


“Employment rose by 40,000 (+0.2%) in August. This increase in employment was outpaced by population growth (+103,000; +0.3%) and the employment rate — the proportion of the population aged 15 and older who are employed—fell 0.1 percentage points to 61.9%,” the report said.

That figure of 103,000 in a month is only the working age population of people 15 and older. It doesn’t include young children. Still, bringing in 103,000 in a month is the equivalent of adding Pickering in Ontario, Lethbridge in Alberta or Kamloops in British Columbia.

Since the beginning of the year, StatsCan says we have averaged 81,000 newcomers aged 15 and older per month. That will equate to just over one million new people this year if the trend continues.


“Given this pace of population growth, employment growth of approximately 50,000 per month is required for the employment rate to remain constant,” the report said.

This level of growth is double what Canada was experiencing between 2017-2019 and before the pandemic effectively closed borders.

So, can we create 50,000 jobs per month so that employment keeps pace with immigration?

In the last 12 months we’ve been over the 50,000 jobs mark four times, lost jobs in two of those months and for the other six, didn’t hit the mark. If we continue to bringin in an average of 81,000 working aged people per month but don’t create at least 50,000 new jobs, then the unemployment rate will go up.

A report from StatsCan issued on August 1 looked at this issue of immigration and employment and found that for the most part, employment has kept up with immigration. That was before this latest increase though and with each increase it becomes more difficult to manage.


Over the last several years we have gone from bringing in between 250,000 to 300,000 new permanent residents each year — people who are immigrating to settle here — to more than 430,000 permanent residents in 2022. The government’s goal is to lift that to 500,000 new permanent residents a year by 2025, a mark they will easily hit.

We have gone from a few hundred thousand international students studying in Canada each year to more than 800,000 last year and estimates of more than 900,000 this year. None of this takes into account the thousands of people claiming asylum in Canada each month or the hundreds of thousands of temporary foreign workers.

A recent CIBC report suggested that Canada’s population count could be off by one million thanks to an undercounting of non-permanent residents, mostly temporary foreign workers.


We have a housing crisis driven by more demand than supply and the ever-increasing population, especially among foreign students, is adding to that. This week we saw a story of international students in North Bay living in tents because of the lack of housing options available.



For the most part, Canadians have been supportive of high levels of immigration. All the major political parties have supported policies of increased immigration.

The current levels, though, unprecedented in our lifetime, could change all of that and result in calls to slow things down.

We don’t have enough housing for the people already in the country, never mind adding a new city per month, but we are also told we need the new arrivals to fill the jobs to build the houses. Our health care system is regularly at a tipping point without enough doctors and nurses to deal with the population already here, but we are also told that we need newcomers to fill the jobs in health care.

Yet, when they get here, we won’t have proper housing, health care, education for their children or infrastructure for the communities they settle in.

It is quite a conundrum.

Is any of this good for the country, or good for the people who are coming here, quite possibly on the false notion that Canada is a country that still functions properly?

Perhaps now is a time to hit pause, perhaps slow the intake until we have a handle on the situation and are sure we can absorb this many people so quickly.
 
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spaminator

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As StatsCan shows immigration soaring, is it time for pause?
Pace of newcomers arriving appears to be outstripping job creation amid a housing crisis.


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Sep 08, 2023 • 3 minute read
In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.
In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.
Have we reached an immigration tipping point in Canada? Figures released by Statistics Canada on Friday definitely point in that direction.


In releasing the latest employment figures, StatsCan said we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.


“Employment rose by 40,000 (+0.2%) in August. This increase in employment was outpaced by population growth (+103,000; +0.3%) and the employment rate — the proportion of the population aged 15 and older who are employed—fell 0.1 percentage points to 61.9%,” the report said.

That figure of 103,000 in a month is only the working age population of people 15 and older. It doesn’t include young children. Still, bringing in 103,000 in a month is the equivalent of adding Pickering in Ontario, Lethbridge in Alberta or Kamloops in British Columbia.

Since the beginning of the year, StatsCan says we have averaged 81,000 newcomers aged 15 and older per month. That will equate to just over one million new people this year if the trend continues.


“Given this pace of population growth, employment growth of approximately 50,000 per month is required for the employment rate to remain constant,” the report said.

This level of growth is double what Canada was experiencing between 2017-2019 and before the pandemic effectively closed borders.

So, can we create 50,000 jobs per month so that employment keeps pace with immigration?

In the last 12 months we’ve been over the 50,000 jobs mark four times, lost jobs in two of those months and for the other six, didn’t hit the mark. If we continue to bringin in an average of 81,000 working aged people per month but don’t create at least 50,000 new jobs, then the unemployment rate will go up.

A report from StatsCan issued on August 1 looked at this issue of immigration and employment and found that for the most part, employment has kept up with immigration. That was before this latest increase though and with each increase it becomes more difficult to manage.


Over the last several years we have gone from bringing in between 250,000 to 300,000 new permanent residents each year — people who are immigrating to settle here — to more than 430,000 permanent residents in 2022. The government’s goal is to lift that to 500,000 new permanent residents a year by 2025, a mark they will easily hit.

We have gone from a few hundred thousand international students studying in Canada each year to more than 800,000 last year and estimates of more than 900,000 this year. None of this takes into account the thousands of people claiming asylum in Canada each month or the hundreds of thousands of temporary foreign workers.

A recent CIBC report suggested that Canada’s population count could be off by one million thanks to an undercounting of non-permanent residents, mostly temporary foreign workers.


We have a housing crisis driven by more demand than supply and the ever-increasing population, especially among foreign students, is adding to that. This week we saw a story of international students in North Bay living in tents because of the lack of housing options available.



For the most part, Canadians have been supportive of high levels of immigration. All the major political parties have supported policies of increased immigration.

The current levels, though, unprecedented in our lifetime, could change all of that and result in calls to slow things down.

We don’t have enough housing for the people already in the country, never mind adding a new city per month, but we are also told we need the new arrivals to fill the jobs to build the houses. Our health care system is regularly at a tipping point without enough doctors and nurses to deal with the population already here, but we are also told that we need newcomers to fill the jobs in health care.

Yet, when they get here, we won’t have proper housing, health care, education for their children or infrastructure for the communities they settle in.

It is quite a conundrum.

Is any of this good for the country, or good for the people who are coming here, quite possibly on the false notion that Canada is a country that still functions properly?

Perhaps now is a time to hit pause, perhaps slow the intake until we have a handle on the situation and are sure we can absorb this many people so quickly.
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spaminator

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Toronto ombud to probe denial of shelter space to refugee claimants
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 21, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read

Toronto’s ombudsman announced an investigation Thursday into the city’s decision to deny refugee claimants certain shelter beds and instead direct them to federal programs.


Ombudsman Kwame Addo says the investigation will determine whether the city met its obligations to the claimants and asylum seekers looking for a shelter bed.


“There is no doubt that the City of Toronto is facing a housing crisis. Even so, the City has an obligation to treat all people in Toronto fairly, with dignity, respect, and care,” he said in a statement Thursday.

The probe will focus on a city decision announced in late May to deny claimants space in city shelters that were not specifically designated for refugees or asylum seekers. Instead, officials said staff would refer them to federal programs because Toronto had not been provided with the funding it needed to deal with unprecedented shelter demand.


The move was quickly met with pushback from advocates, who argued it undermined Toronto’s own policies and resulted in dozens of migrants sleeping on sidewalks outside a downtown referral centre.

The investigation announced Thursday is the first to come out of the office’s newly created housing unit led by deputy ombudsman Reema Patel, who is tasked with keeping a watch on the city’s planning and delivery of housing programs.

“All people have a right to adequate housing that is safe and secure. Allegations that this right has been infringed _ particularly with a group of people fleeing persecution in their home countries — is serious and must be thoroughly investigated,” Patel said in a statement.

The investigation is set to delve into what led to the decision, whether it was in keeping with policies, procedures and rules, and the city’s communications with staff and the public.


In a statement, a spokesperson for the City of Toronto said it would fully co-operate with the investigation, pledging the ombudsman with “the entire scope of work undertaken by staff on this complex and important matter.”

Mayor Olivia Chow has put a spotlight on the issue since taking office in July, repeatedly pressing the federal government for more help to support the roughly 3,500 refugees currently in the shelter system.

She says the $97 million pledged by Ottawa earlier this year is only a slice of the estimated $200 million it’s expected to cost the city to shelter refugee claimants, who are projected to account for about half of city’s shelter population by the end of the year.

In a statement, Chow said although she’s working with staff to ensure people, regardless of status, are provided with services, the city’s shelters are full and hundreds of people are being turned away every night.

“I welcome the Ombudsman’s investigation as we keep working to ensure people are able to access the shelter spaces they need,” her statement read.
 

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More than 60% of foreigners ordered deported from Canada stayed put
The Canada Border Services Agency figures are from 2016-2022

Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Sep 21, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read

Figures from the Canada Border Services Agency show more than half of the foreigners ordered out of the country have stayed put over a six-year period, reports Blacklock’s Reporter.


During the period of 2016-2022, 13,605 foreigners were ordered deported but 8,723 — or 64% — remained in Canada.


Incomplete figures showed about 10% of deportees left voluntarily.

The CBSA has promised to increase its deportation rate.

“Everyone ordered removed from Canada is entitled to due process before the law,” the CBSA wrote in an Inquiry Of Ministry tabled in the Commons.

“All removal orders are subject to various levels of appeal, including judicial review. Once all legal avenues have been exhausted, foreign nationals are processed for removal.”

The figures came at the request of Conservative MP Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard) who asked, “How many individuals were sent deportation letters by the government? And how many currently remain in Canada?”


“Removals are prioritized based on a risk management regime with cases involving national security, organized crime, human rights violations and criminality being the highest priority for the safety and security of Canada,” a CSBA memo states. “This first priority also includes failed irregular migrant asylum seekers that entered between Canada’s ports of entry.”

Last year a total 2,002 foreigners were ordered to leave Canada, 373 left on their own and 386 others were removed by CBSA agents.

The remaining of 1,057, or 53%, stayed in Canada.

The enforcement of deportation orders has been tracked by MPs since a 2021 report by Auditor General Karen Hogan estimated federal agents lost track of thousands of deportees, including 2,800 with criminal records.
 

spaminator

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Immigration drives massive Canadian population increase: StatCan
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Laura Osman
Published Sep 27, 2023 • 1 minute read
Statistics Canada says immigration is almost solely responsible for the largest annual population boom Canada has seen since 1957.
Statistics Canada says immigration is almost solely responsible for the largest annual population boom Canada has seen since 1957.
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada says immigration is almost solely responsible for the largest annual population boom Canada has seen since 1957.


The newly released data shows Canada’s population grew by more than a million people between from July 2022 to July 2023, which represents an increase of about three per cent.


Canada also saw a massive 46 per cent increase in the number of temporary residents in Canada over the same period.

The Liberal government has set record-breaking targets for immigration over the last several years, but doesn’t set specific goals or caps for the number of people who come to Canada on temporary visas.

The estimated number of temporary residents in Canada now outnumbers the Indigenous population accounted for in the 2021 census.

The increase in temporary residents was mostly due to people with work visas, rather than international students.

In terms of actual numbers, the population growth over the last year is more than double the increase seen in 1957, when the baby boom was at its heights and there was a Hungarian refugee crisis.
 

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CBSA says more than 29,000 foreign fugitives at large in Canada
MPS demanded count after 2021 audit

Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Oct 20, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read

The Canada Border Services Agency says more than 29,000 foreign fugitives are at large in the country, reports Blacklock’s Reporter.


In a report to MPs, management called the 29,248 “wanted inventory” and the lengthy list includes foreigners convicted of crimes.


Another 10,041 foreigners banned from Canada were deported.

“The wanted inventory includes cases under review to determine if a warrant is required or cases where a warrant has been issued for the arrest, detention and removal of a foreign national,” the CBSA wrote in its report to the Commons public accounts committee.

“The complexity of cases in the ‘removals working’ inventory has steadily increased since 2011. It requires more effort from the Agency to enforce removal orders.”



MPs demanded regular updates on the fugitive count following a 2021 audit that discovered the CBSA lost track of 2,800 foreign criminals in Canada.

The audit found at least 70% of criminal cases were not reviewed annually and lapsed year after year.

Access To Information records earlier obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation showed foreign fugitives included defendants implicated in serious crimes such as murder, assault, drug trafficking, fraud and theft.

The CBSA has spent $34 million a year on its deportation program.
 

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CBSA says more than 29,000 foreign fugitives at large in Canada
MPS demanded count after 2021 audit

Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Oct 20, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read

The Canada Border Services Agency says more than 29,000 foreign fugitives are at large in the country, reports Blacklock’s Reporter.


In a report to MPs, management called the 29,248 “wanted inventory” and the lengthy list includes foreigners convicted of crimes.


Another 10,041 foreigners banned from Canada were deported.

“The wanted inventory includes cases under review to determine if a warrant is required or cases where a warrant has been issued for the arrest, detention and removal of a foreign national,” the CBSA wrote in its report to the Commons public accounts committee.

“The complexity of cases in the ‘removals working’ inventory has steadily increased since 2011. It requires more effort from the Agency to enforce removal orders.”



MPs demanded regular updates on the fugitive count following a 2021 audit that discovered the CBSA lost track of 2,800 foreign criminals in Canada.

The audit found at least 70% of criminal cases were not reviewed annually and lapsed year after year.

Access To Information records earlier obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation showed foreign fugitives included defendants implicated in serious crimes such as murder, assault, drug trafficking, fraud and theft.

The CBSA has spent $34 million a year on its deportation program.
Yup & I'm sure they're planning something. It will be coordinated with those who have crossed the Southern U.S. Border where there are an estimated 1M people unaccounted for who have escaped detection. It's just a matter of time as I'm sure the "cells" are simply getting their "supplies" & "weapons" ready for action. It's not going to be nice, that's for sure. Anyhoo - that's my prediction & I hope & pray I'm wrong.
 

spaminator

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Enough foreign fugitives to fill Fort Erie scoffing at soft Canada

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Published Oct 23, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read
Murder someone in the U.S., Mexico, India or points in between? No worries. Canada is rolling out the red carpet.

Murder someone in the U.S., Mexico, India or points in between?


No worries. Canada is rolling out the red carpet.


On Friday, a report revealed that the Canada Border Services Agency admits more than 29,000 foreign fugitives are at large in the country. From the fun facts file, that would be like everyone in Fort Erie being a crook.

Take Punjabi gangster Goldy Brar.

Warrants have been sworn out for Brar for the murder of District Youth Congress President Gurlal Singh Pehalwan. Then, on May 29, 2022, Brar claimed credit for the murders of Indian singer and politician Sidhu Moose Wala.

The 29-year-old told us so on his Facebook page. Brar is also linked to a gang responsible for the slayings of a number of high-ranking cops. He slipped into Canada in 2017 using the old student visa dodge.


To be fair, most of the foreign fugitives at large are not Goldy Brar. Their crimes are a hodgepodge of the mostly mundane.

Still, how did they slip into the country? A friend of mine was once ordered out of Canada even though he was contributing to the community and economy.

CBSA treated him like a killer. No appeals. Nothing. Out.

So why the largesse for the likes of Goldy Brar?

He is, apparently in the stale voice of the Ottawa bureaucrat, “wanted inventory.”

Is that all? Nothing to see here, folks.


The CBSA wrote in its report to the Commons: “The wanted inventory includes cases under review to determine if a warrant is required or cases where a warrant has been issued for the arrest, detention and removal of a foreign national.”


“The complexity of cases in the ‘removals working’ inventory has steadily increased since 2011. It requires more effort from the agency to enforce removal orders.”

No shock!

This is the same unit that admitted losing track of 2,800 foreign criminals in the country in 2021, with 70% of the criminal cases not even getting a second look.

Among the wanted foreign fugitives, some were implicated in crimes like murder, assault, drug trafficking, sex assault, fraud and theft.

Sukhdool Singh Gill’s end run came to a dramatic conclusion in a Winnipeg industrial park in September. Cops found the 39-year-old notorious criminal shot to death.


Gill was wanted on a multitude of charges in the subcontinent as “a criminal, not a terrorist,” cops said. Indian cops said he was a facilitator of death, sneaking into Canada in 2017 on an illegally obtained passport.


Another rock star fugitive who had been on the CBSA wanted list (which has been scrapped for … whatever reason) was Mohamed Ratni. The failed refugee claimant had ties to an Algerian terrorist group.

He was first busted in 2012 before Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board sprung him under “strict” conditions. Then, he disappeared before being arrested and taken back into custody in 2019.

In August, the CBSA told the Globe and Mail there were active warrants for 300 foreign criminals “deemed a danger to the public and facing deportation.” This supergroup includes sex offenders and killers.


Of course, everyone remembers serial killer Charles Ng, home address: San Quentin, Death Row.

Ng ticked a lot of boxes: He raped, tortured and murdered between 11 and 25 women in the 1980s.

When the music stopped, Ng fled to Canada where he was busted on a weapons and robbery beef. Much haggling and pearl-clutching over Ng ensued before he was whisked by the Mounties to California to face justice.

The killer played Canadian authorities like a fiddle. This seems to be par for the course.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
 

spaminator

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Program let thousands of inadmissible foreign nationals into Canada: CBSA
Fewer than half of 168 permits checked at random followed the rules, report says

Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Oct 23, 2023 • 1 minute read

The Canada Border Services Agency said thousands of inadmissible foreigners were let into the country under the temporary resident permit program that previously failed four audits.


And fewer than half — about 48 % — of 168 permits checked at random followed the rules, according to Blacklock’s Reporter.


“Without monitoring and confirming the departure of these travellers, the agency cannot take enforcement action, particularly for persons who may pose a risk to Canada,” said the CBSA report.



The program, which allows foreigners — otherwise prohibited from Canada — to stay up to three years and qualify for health and welfare benefits, failed audits in 2008, 2017, 2019 and 2021.

Customs officers can issue the $200 permits to border-crossers if they are “satisfied the foreign national’s need to enter or remain in Canada is compelling enough to overcome the health and safety risks to Canadian society.”

Rules require that permit-holders show “compelling reasons to warrant the issuance of the permit and how it outweighs the risks.”

More than 6,000 permits a year were issued prior to the pandemic, said the CBSA report, but that number fell by almost two-thirds to 2,044 in 2020 due to pandemic lockdowns and Quarantine Act enforcement.

The report said of the 168 permit-holders audited, 23% were from Ukraine and Afghanistan.