Omar Alghabra States That Flights Leaving an Hour Late Are Actually on Time.

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
9,947
4,417
113
Olympus Mons
In the most fitting of ironies, on Sept. 14, at Saint John Airport, after the conclusion of the federal Liberal government caucus retreat, Transport Minister Omar Alghabra’s flight to Toronto was delayed by 55 minutes. That the delay was not caused by a government airport failure but by heavy fog isn’t the irony.
It was that the minister was personally experiencing a flight delay that he has tried to convince travellers was a figment of their imagination, in full view of several of his colleagues as well the media.

Since April, Canadian air travellers have experienced some of the world’s worst airport disruptions. Massive lines at both airport security and customs have become the rule, not the exception. These persistent federal service failures have, in turn, contributed to cascading operational challenges for airlines from misconnecting travellers, delayed bags, reduced preventative aircraft maintenance opportunities, and flight crew and other staffing shortages.
In response to these failures, Alghabra, decided that his best option is to redefine the meaning of “flight delay.” For several weeks, Alghabra has tweeted graphics that claimed “more flights are departing on time.” But, in the fine print, he reveals that his standard was “flights departing within an hour of scheduled departure.”

Airports and airlines are part of an industry with global standards. In the case of on time performance, or OTP, the definition is a flight operating within fifteen minutes of schedule. This definition, in turn, underpins airline schedules allowing for the smooth connection of travellers and bags.
By redefining OTP, Alghabra has unilaterally decided to lower Canada’s standards in order to meet his government’s failures. Think that your flight to Halifax is an hour late? Actually, the minister says it’s “on time.” And that 90-minute delay to Paris? Don’t sweat it. To Alghabra, it’s only 30 minutes late.
Ultimately, the minister’s Toronto flight arrived 61 minutes late. By his definition, it was just one minute behind schedule.

The absurdity of Canada’s senior-most transport official favouring this approach is obvious to any traveller or airline employee. Remarkably, the minister’s attempt to redefine standards doesn’t end with OTP.
In a press release touting the Government’s “successes,” Alghabra lists hiring 1,800 new Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) screeners as his top achievement. Lower on the list, however, Canadians discover that his department was “granting exemptions to allow new screening officers to work while training.”
So, in order to minimize the impact of CATSA’s failure to hire in time for the summer travel peak, Transport Canada redefined operational requirements allowing trainees to be deployed during the busiest travel period of the year.

DEE: Rather than solve airport problems, feds try to change definition of success | Edmonton Sun
 

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
9,947
4,417
113
Olympus Mons
I was thinking on this a bit more and basically our Transport Minister has announced to the world and the airline industry that Canada is NOT a reliable destination if you want to stay close to schedule.
 

Taxslave2

Electoral Member
Aug 13, 2022
371
190
43
My drill sergeant used to say "On time is LATE! Fifteen minutes early is on time!"
I like him. People that are fashionable late irk me. There was an uncle and aunt that did that all the 5pm. In their circles perhaps it did, but not with the rest of the family. Doctors can also be annoying. If I have to be at his office on 5pm he should also be there at a reasonable time, say 2ithin 10 minutes. After that it is my time he is wasting, and I generally have other appointments that day.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,532
2,565
113
Edmonton
In the most fitting of ironies, on Sept. 14, at Saint John Airport, after the conclusion of the federal Liberal government caucus retreat, Transport Minister Omar Alghabra’s flight to Toronto was delayed by 55 minutes. That the delay was not caused by a government airport failure but by heavy fog isn’t the irony.
It was that the minister was personally experiencing a flight delay that he has tried to convince travellers was a figment of their imagination, in full view of several of his colleagues as well the media.

Since April, Canadian air travellers have experienced some of the world’s worst airport disruptions. Massive lines at both airport security and customs have become the rule, not the exception. These persistent federal service failures have, in turn, contributed to cascading operational challenges for airlines from misconnecting travellers, delayed bags, reduced preventative aircraft maintenance opportunities, and flight crew and other staffing shortages.
In response to these failures, Alghabra, decided that his best option is to redefine the meaning of “flight delay.” For several weeks, Alghabra has tweeted graphics that claimed “more flights are departing on time.” But, in the fine print, he reveals that his standard was “flights departing within an hour of scheduled departure.”

Airports and airlines are part of an industry with global standards. In the case of on time performance, or OTP, the definition is a flight operating within fifteen minutes of schedule. This definition, in turn, underpins airline schedules allowing for the smooth connection of travellers and bags.
By redefining OTP, Alghabra has unilaterally decided to lower Canada’s standards in order to meet his government’s failures. Think that your flight to Halifax is an hour late? Actually, the minister says it’s “on time.” And that 90-minute delay to Paris? Don’t sweat it. To Alghabra, it’s only 30 minutes late.
Ultimately, the minister’s Toronto flight arrived 61 minutes late. By his definition, it was just one minute behind schedule.

The absurdity of Canada’s senior-most transport official favouring this approach is obvious to any traveller or airline employee. Remarkably, the minister’s attempt to redefine standards doesn’t end with OTP.
In a press release touting the Government’s “successes,” Alghabra lists hiring 1,800 new Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) screeners as his top achievement. Lower on the list, however, Canadians discover that his department was “granting exemptions to allow new screening officers to work while training.”
So, in order to minimize the impact of CATSA’s failure to hire in time for the summer travel peak, Transport Canada redefined operational requirements allowing trainees to be deployed during the busiest travel period of the year.

DEE: Rather than solve airport problems, feds try to change definition of success | Edmonton Sun
This man is an idiot!! His explanations defy everything known to man!!