john tory affair ends in resignation

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Mayor John Tory stepping down after admitted affair with former staffer
Author of the article:Antonella Artuso
Published Feb 10, 2023 • Last updated 4 hours ago • 2 minute read

Toronto Mayor John Tory has stepped down after acknowledging an inappropriate relationship with someone who worked in his office.


Addressing the media at a hastily called news conference Friday night, Tory said he made a serious error in judgment and apologized to the city and to his wife of more than 40 years.


“During the pandemic, I developed a relationship with an employee in my office in a way that did not meet the standards to which I hold myself as mayor and as a family man,” he said. “As a result, I have decided that I will step down as mayor so that I can take the time to reflect on my mistakes and to do the work of rebuilding the trust of my family.”

The relationship started during a period when he and his wife were apart for lengthy periods due to his work handling the COVID pandemic, Tory said.

He said the staff member left his office and sought other employment during the relationship, which has since ended.


Tory, who was re-elected to a third term by a strong majority of voters in October, said he regretted leaving a job and city he loves but he did not want to see it go through a prolonged period of controversy.



He expressed his contrition to his staff, council colleagues and the public service.

“Most of all I apologize to my wife Barb and to my family who I’ve let down more than anyone else,” he said.

Tory said that despite his long-standing stint in public life, he is at heart a private person and he asked that his family’s privacy be respected.


Tory said he has asked the city’s integrity commissioner to review the matter.

The sudden departure of Tory comes just days before city council was to consider the operating and capital budgets that he put forward under his new strong mayor powers.

Tory plans to work with Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie and senior staff on a “orderly transition.”



While some criticized Tory’s behaviour, others praised his willingness to take responsibility and resign.

Tory had served as mayor since 2014 and previously was the leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives.

aartuso@postmedia.com
 
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Tory tosses away his legacy with an act of incredible foolishness
Author of the article:Lorrie Goldstein
Published Feb 10, 2023 • Last updated 4 hours ago • 3 minute read

John Tory got that rarest of things in politics — a second chance — and he threw it away.

Nine years ago, Torontonians elected Tory as mayor to end the craziness at City Hall, bringing to an end the scandal-plagued Rob Ford era of city politics.


On Friday night, Tory, 68, admitting to an affair with a staffer and resigning, brought the craziness back to City Hall.

He’s thrown the governance of the city into chaos at a time when it most needs a steady hand.

He’s betrayed his wife of 44 years, Barbara, his family and his own legacy as a competent manager of the city.


After losing his first bid at becoming Toronto’s mayor in 2003, finishing second to David Miller, he returned to win the top job in 2014 and held it for eight years and three mayoral victories, after what was widely considered a disastrous run as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party at Queen’s Park.

That was blown up by another example of Tory’s propensity to display remarkably bad judgment from time to time, despite his normally sensible demeanour.



In the 2007 Ontario election, Tory was poised to give Liberal premier Dalton McGuinty, who had been in power for four years amid a bevy of spending controversies, a run for his money.


After all, Tory had cut his political teeth in politics serving as legendary Ontario Progressive Conservative premier Bill Davis’ principal secretary from 1981 to 1985.

He followed that up with a successful business career culminating with his elevation to president and CEO of Rogers Communications and Rogers Cable and a public service stint as commissioner of the Canadian Football League in order to keep it alive.

Despite his political and business pedigree, Tory blew up his provincial election campaign in 2007 by proposing a hugely unpopular policy of full funding for faith-based schools if he won the election, and refused to abandon it even as his support plummeted in the polls.

McGuinty was returned with a majority government, Tory’s leadership never recovered and he resigned from provincial politics in 2009, becoming a popular talk show host on Newstalk 1010 before winning the Toronto mayor’s race in 2014.


But even before Tory’s uninspiring turn as Ontario Progressive Conservative leader there was another incident that displayed his propensity for moments of incredibly bad judgment in an otherwise largely successful career.

In the 1993 federal election, serving as co-chair of Progressive Conservative leader Kim Campbell’s federal election campaign, he authorized a campaign ad mocking then Liberal leader Jean Chretien’s facial features.

The ad provoked national outrage, even among Conservative candidates.


Chretien, his mouth partially paralyzed from having contracted Bell’s Palsy as child, destroyed the Progressive Conservative campaign when he quipped:

“Last night, the Conservative Party reached a new low; they tried to make fun of the way I look. God gave me a physical defect, and I accepted that since I’m a kid. It’s true, that I speak on one side of my mouth. I’m not a Tory, I don’t speak on both sides of my mouth.”

The PCs, who had entered the election with a majority government, were reduced to two seats and Chretien went on to win three majority governments in a row.

Despite such political disasters, Tory was poised to end his political career on a high note — 12 successful years as mayor of Toronto ending in 2026 when he planned to retire.

Then he tossed it all away.

lgoldstein@postmedia.com
 

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John Tory's surprise resignation sparks questions about what's next for Toronto
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Feb 11, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

Questions remain about what lies ahead for Toronto following the abrupt resignation of mayor John Tory on Friday night.

The two-term mayor, who had just been re-elected to a third stint in office in October, stepped down over what he described as an inappropriate relationship with a former member of his office staff.


Tory offered few details about the affair during a hastily called Friday night news conference, only saying it had developed during the COVID-19 pandemic and ended by mutual consent earlier this year.

The unnamed employee is now working at another job.


Tory says he’s working with senior city staff and Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie to ensure a smooth transition, but has not formally named his interim successor.

Provincial legislation states a byelection will need to take place within 60 days of the mayor’s office officially becoming vacant to name a permanent replacement.


Ontario Premier Doug Ford thanked Tory, whom he called a friend, for his years of public service including his time in the city’s top job.

“John will be remembered as a dedicated and hard-working mayor who served as a steady leader during the most difficult days of the pandemic,” Ford said in a statement Saturday morning.

“He united Toronto behind an optimistic vision for the future and I will miss working with him to see it come to life. I wish nothing but the best for my friend in the days, weeks and months ahead.”


Tory told reporters late Friday he notified the Office of the Integrity Commissioner of the relationship and asked him to review it, saying he believes it is important to avoid tarnishing the mayoral office or putting City Hall through a prolonged period of controversy over what he describes as an error in judgment on his part.

Tory served two scandal-free terms as mayor of Toronto and had just been re-elected for a third in October.

He thanked the people of Toronto for trusting him as mayor, a position he called “the job of a lifetime.”

“I believe I did some good for the city I truly love, particularly during the pandemic,” he said.




He said the relationship with the employee developed while he was spending long periods of time away from his wife Barbara, to whom he has been married for over 40 years.

“I recognize that permitting this relationship to develop was a serious error in judgment on my part,” Tory said at city hall, where he apologized “unreservedly to the people of Toronto and to all those hurt by my actions including my staff, my colleagues and the public service.”

He said he was stepping down as mayor in order to reflect on his mistakes and focus on rebuilding trust with his family.

He asked for privacy for all affected by his actions, including his wife, family and himself.

Tory, 68, was first elected mayor in 2014, partially on a promise to restore respectability to the office following the scandal-plagued tenure of his predecessor Rob Ford.


He secured a second mandate in 2018 and cruised to a third term in October after a campaign that saw him tout his years of experience as head of Canada’s most populous city.

He secured about 62% of the vote compared to 18% for progressive urbanist Gil Penalosa, who came second. Tory beat out 30 mostly unknown candidates after many criticized his record on transit and housing — two issues he had highlighted as priorities.

In a tweet late Friday night, Penalosa said “now Torontonians have a chance to elect better.”

Tory’s most recent election win came as he faced criticism about the state of Toronto under his leadership. His opponents noted the high cost of housing, aging infrastructure, overflowing garbage bins and shuttered parks.


His leadership saw increased scrutiny in recent weeks over his announcement of a proposed $48.3-million increase to the city’s police budget, which would bring police funding to just over $1.1 billion for 2023 — a figure Tory’s critics said was grossly inflated compared to other line items and underfunded social services.

Tory also saw criticism for his handling of the city’s housing crisis, as thousands of people are experiencing homelessness and Toronto’s shelter capacity is stretched to its limits.

Just this week, Toronto city council scrapped a recommendation to keep its warming centres open around the clock until mid-April after a bout of extreme cold, as well as to declare a public health crisis over lack of shelter space. With support from Tory, council voted instead to call for more federal support and have staff study the idea further.

Kristyn Wong-Tam, a former Toronto city councillor who often disagreed with Tory’s positions and current member of the Ontario legislature, issued a tweet calling Tory’s affair with a staffer “not a simple, one-time lapse of judgment,” but “an abuse of power.”

Toronto city council is set to debate Tory’s proposed budget at a Wednesday meeting. It will be the first under new so-called strong mayor powers granted to Toronto by the province, which Tory had said he would use in a limited and responsible way.
 

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Why Tory knew he had to quit once extramarital affair exposed
Author of the article:Lorrie Goldstein
Published Feb 11, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

Among the many opinions being offered about Toronto Mayor John Tory’s shock resignation Friday because of an extramarital affair with an advisor in his office, some are saying since the relationship was a private matter, consensual and has ended, he should not have had to resign.


To the contrary, Tory himself knew he had to resign because he violated provisions in the city’s Code of Conduct for Members of Council which states:


“In serving the public, a member of Council is expected to meet the highest standards of conduct to maintain and foster the City of Toronto’s reputation and integrity.”

The specific provision dealing most directly with Tory’s situation states:

“Members should perform their duties and arrange their private affairs in a manner that promotes public confidence and bears close public scrutiny.”



Two other provisions are also relevant:

“Members should act with integrity and avoid real and apparent conflicts of interest and the improper use of their influence.”

“Members should serve the public interest by upholding both the letter and the spirit of federal and provincial laws and the bylaws and policies adopted by city council.”


As the leader of council and Toronto’s municipal government, Tory had the highest obligation to adhere to these standards.

True, other politicians, including mayors, have tried to weather the storm of extramarital affairs and similar personal controversies. Some have succeeded.

It’s to Tory’s credit he resigned immediately, although keep in mind the reason was that the Toronto Star had broken the story of his affair minutes earlier.

The fact Tory, 68, was 37 years older than the 31-year-old former advisor with whom he had the affair is irrelevant.


What is relevant is that Tory was the mayor and she was his subordinate, which means whether the affair was consensual is irrelevant because of the obvious power imbalance in the relationship.


The city’s policy on sexual harassment in the workplace cautions against “making a sexual solicitation or advance where the person making the solicitation or advance is in a position to confer, grant or deny a benefit or advancement to the worker, and the person knows or ought reasonably to know that the solicitation or advance is unwelcome.”

While Tory described their relationship as consensual — and it may well have been — the public has no way of knowing what it was and whether his position of authority was a factor in the relationship.

The fact it was an extramarital affair and thus by its nature secret, eliminated precautions that can normally be taken in such situations, such as reporting their relationship to human resources once it developed.


Also relevant is that a central part of Tory’s political brand was as a stable, family man, married to wife Barbara for 44 years, and a loving father and grandfather with a successful business and public service career.

Given that, Tory’s extramarital relationship could conceivably have opened him up to blackmail or secret and undue influence affecting his political decisions.

While there’s no reason to think that happened, the fact it could have happened is the issue.

There was a time in the not-too-distant past where Tory’s extramarital affair might never have been reported, as was the case with the late U.S. president John F. Kennedy, where the media covering him knew of his affairs but considered it irrelevant to his ability to do his job.

But that was then and this is now.

lgoldstein@postmedia.com
 

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Reaction to Tory's resignation amid sex scandal mixed
Author of the article:Jane Stevenson
Published Feb 11, 2023 • 2 minute read

Toronto Mayor John Tory’s bombshell Friday night announcement that the 68-year-old is stepping down after admitting to engaging in a relationship with 31-year-old staffer has drawn a range of reaction from shock to compassion.


Kristyn Wong-Tam, former city councillor for Ward 13-Toronto Centre, who often had political disagreements with Tory, tweeted Friday: “Tonight I fully agree that he should resign. His is not a simple, one-time lapse of judgement. Tory was her boss and this is an abuse of power.”




Jennifer Keesmaat, former city planner and Tory’s opponent in the 2018 mayoral race, said in numerous tweets Friday: “This is a lot to process. Like this city did not have enough going on. I hope our next Mayor keep’s Tory’s Housing Plan released last month – it will make a difference in creating housing in the places where we need it most.”



Urbanist Gil Penalosa, who ran against Tory in the 2022 election and has said he’ll run again in a 2023 byelection, tweeted: “Not just a serious error of judgement. He was her boss, it began before & ended after the campaign. As ‘secret’ as negotiating mayoral powers. Either would have changed the result of the election for mayor of Toronto. Fortunately, now Torontonians have a chance to elect better.”




Josh Matlow, city councillor for Ward 12, Toronto-St. Paul’s, tweeted Saturday: “We cannot let what happened distract focus from delivering an improved budget this Wednesday.”



And in a statement released Saturday morning, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said in part: “John will be remembered as a dedicated and hard-working mayor who served as a steady leader during the most difficult days of the pandemic. He united Toronto behind an optimistic vision for the future and I will miss working with him to see it come to life.”

jstevenson@postmedia.com
 

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Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie to temporarily take reins once Tory resigns
Author of the article:Jane Stevenson
Published Feb 11, 2023 • 1 minute read

Under the City of Toronto Act, Jennifer McKelvie, deputy mayor and councillor for Ward 25 Scarborough–Rouge Park, is poised to take over Mayor John Tory’s job until a byelection can be held.


But who is McKelvie?


FAMILY LIFE: McKelvie and her family moved to Scarborough in 2005.

EDUCATION/VOLUNTEER WORK: A University of Toronto’s Scarborough campus grad, McKelvie became a professional geoscientist. She also volunteered with the Scarborough Community Renewal Organization and the Centennial Community & Recreation Association.


POLITICAL SERVICE: McKelvie first sought to be a Toronto city councillor in 2014, challenging then-councillor Ron Moeser to represent the former Ward 44 but came in second. But for the 2018 election, after the Toronto’s 44 wards were consolidated into 25, she ran in the new riding of Scarborough–Rouge Park and was elected in one of the tightest council races beating Neethan Shan by just 154 votes. By the 2022 election, McKelvie easily won.


POLITICAL STRIPE: During the 2018-2022 term, McKelvie often aligned with Tory on many issues. After appointing her deputy mayor in 2022, Tory said McKelvie shared his commitment to “getting more housing built as quickly as possible” and “making sure the nuts and bolts of municipal government work.”

PRIORITIES: She supports the city’s automated speed enforcement program expansion, including 25 more cameras being recently added; has pushed for road design improvements; more signalized crossings in Scarborough; more provincial and federal funds to build the Eglington East LRT; and lobbied for the construction of a three-stop subway extension to Scarborough before entering politics.

OTHER CIVIC TITLES: McKelvie also serves as vice-chair of the executive committee and chair of the infrastructure and environment committee where she’s overseeing the city’s Vision Zero strategy, sits on the Scarborough Community Council, Toronto Zoo board of management and the Toronto Hydro Corporation.
 

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John Tory announced his resignation but he's still officially Toronto's mayor
Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Feb 11, 2023 • 1 minute read

In light of Mayor John Tory announcing his resignation Friday night, the big question is: Who is the mayor of Toronto right now?

I asked the question of a dozen people and the answered varied.


Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie was the most common answer.

No one I talked to said it was still John Tory. It wasn’t clear to me, so I reached out to the mayor’s office for clarification.

The answer? The mayor of Toronto at this time is still John Tory.

“You’re correct — still officially mayor and will resign in the coming days,” mayor’s office spokesperson Blue Knox said. “Those details will be finalized in the days ahead.”


So, despite Tory’s admission that he had “developed a relationship with an employee in my office in a way that did not meet the standards to which I hold myself as mayor and as a family man,” he is still at this time holding the reigns of the city until he officially hands over the job.

“As the Mayor said (Friday), he will be working with the City Manager, the City Clerk and Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie to ensure an orderly transition in the coming days,” said Knox.

Tory’s stunning announcement shocked the city and has put the future leadership of Toronto up for grabs.

“While I deeply regret having to step away from a job that I love, in a city that I love even more, I believe in my heart, it is best to fully commit myself to the work that is required to repair these most important relationships as well,” said Tory.

While he has indicated he is leaving to not “tarnish” the position, John Tory is still mayor of Toronto as of Saturday with no exact date revealed for him to officially step down.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 

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Mayor John Tory to attend Hazel McCallion's funeral despite scandal
Tory says he's working on repairing his damaged relationships with his family while trying to do the "straight up and honourable" thing in how he moves on from City Hall

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Feb 11, 2023 • Last updated 23 hours ago • 3 minute read

Despite his personal life and political career being in flames, Toronto Mayor John Tory said he will not miss legendary former Mississauga mayor Hazel McCallion’s funeral.


“I will be at Hazel’s funeral,” Tory confirmed Saturday. “There was no question in my mind that despite everything I would go to the lying in state tomorrow and (be) at the funeral as she requested on Tuesday.”


Although Hurricane Hazel’s son Peter McCallion said the family has no problem with Tory speaking, the Mayor said he didn’t want to be a “distraction” and has decided he would be there but without taking the podium in order to not take any focus away from the iconic mayor who died just shy of her 102nd birthday.

Tory was one her close friends, along with Premier Doug Ford and hockey legend Don Cherry — all three of whom were at Hazel’s side in her final days before she died Jan. 29.

The plan is for Tory to attend the funeral as mayor of Toronto, which he still he is. As he said in his news conference Friday, and again Saturday, he plans to meet with the city clerk and deputy mayor in the coming days in the spirit of transition before he officially steps down.



Tory said there has been no timeline or date set on when he will officially leave office but it won’t be “dragged out” as he wants to avoid any scenes like what happened to his predecessor Rob Ford who had media chasing him down the halls following revelations of his crack cocaine use.

With that in mind, Tory said he also has decided not to attend the Toronto Maple Leafs open practice on the rink at Nathan Phillip’s Square on Sunday.

All of this has come about after the revelation that Tory, 68, had been in an inappropriate relationship with a female member of his staff, 37 years his junior, during the pandemic.

Tory has said the affair ended mutually earlier this year.


While there has been mentions on social media concerning receipts filed by a staffer, who the Sun has chosen not to name, Tory said this is unfair because she was “organizing” the trips to places like London, England working “12-hour” days and their relationship had not yet begun.

Tory said, “I wrote a letter (Friday) night” to the Integrity commissioner “saying I want you to review” the details around the affair but he’s confident there will be no costs that were billed to the city or its taxpayers.

It’s still unclear if Integrity Commissioner Jonathan Batty has purview over elected or appointed city personnel once they have severed their services with the city. Batty has so far not returned requests for information on these questions.


The 31-year-old staffer who Tory was involved with left the City of Toronto more than a year ago and has been working with Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment.

While she has not commented, sources close to her indicate she has retained legal counsel who is in contact with Mayor Tory’s lawyer.

A family member of the former staffer declined to comment on the circumstances, but one family friend said the one time “beauty queen” is a beautiful person who is humble, hard-working and friendly.

Meanwhile, Tory said he’s working on repairing his damaged relationships with his family while trying to do the “straight up and honourable” thing in how he moves on from City Hall.

“I made a mistake,” said Tory, adding, “When you make a mistake you have to take responsibility, especially when you are a role model for others.”

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 

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Tory's budget in jeopardy?
Author of the article:Antonella Artuso
Published Feb 11, 2023 • 3 minute read

Toronto city councillors should not attempt to take advantage of political turmoil in the wake of Mayor John Tory’s resignation to completely rewrite the proposed budget, Councillor Brad Bradford says.


The operating and capital budgets that are scheduled to go before council this week represent not only Tory’s vision, which he successfully campaigned on last fall, but also the input of city staff, members of the public and others, Bradford said.


“To suggest that the events of the last 24 hours somehow invalidate those many months of work, those thousands of points of input, and all the consultation that’s done to date is purely political and disingenuous,” Bradford said. “Frankly, I think too many folks on council have been too obstructionist for too long… There will be the tendency for some folks to spike the football, there will be the tendency for some colleagues to play politics, but I think if you go out and talk to your neighbours or you talk to small businesses on main street or you talk to our frontline workers they want us to show up to work and get the job done.”

Councillor Stephen Holyday said he believes there will be some councillors who will attempt to use the uncertainty caused by the Mayor’s departure to push forward agendas like defunding the police or higher taxes.


The budget as proposed has funding for 200 new police officers and 90 TTC special constables — a reaction to public safety concerns over gun violence and random attacks on public transit.

However, Holyday said he believes the majority of councillors will want to continue on the same path.

“The public should take comfort that we will make it through this process and the snow will keep getting plowed, the garbage will keep getting picked up, and water’s going to keep flowing through the taps,” Holyday said. “But I do think that this will be a period of political uncertainty as people step forward and make their case to be the next mayor of the city.”

In a hastily-called press conference Friday night, Tory apologized and announced his intention to resign just months into his third term of office, acknowledging he had an extramarital affair that began when the woman worked in his office.



Tory had yet to resign Saturday but a spokesperson said the action was expected in the coming days.

Deputy Mayor Jennifer McKelvie is taking a leadership role on council until a new mayor is elected.

The strong mayor powers afforded the municipal leaders of Ottawa and Toronto under the Doug Ford government’s Bill 39 — including the ability to pass bylaws with the support of just one-third of councillors — do not transfer to a deputy, interim or acting mayor.


That means a majority of council votes will likely be required to get the budget passed.

There is already pressure to change the budget, which invests in housing and more police officers and TTC special constables with a combined property tax and city building increase of 7%.

CUPE National tweeted, “Scrap the Tory budget. We need affordable housing, better public transit, and robust public services.”

Councillor Josh Matlow said in a tweet that he will work with colleagues to deliver “an improved budget … to ensure that every Torontonian has a warm place to go, the TTC is truly safe and reliable, we address the roots of health and safety our communities, repair our crumbling infrastructure and roads, and finally make the necessary investments in well-maintained parks and the services residents rely on.”

aartuso@postmedia.com
 

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Toronto needs a level-headed candidate to win race to replace John Tory
The race is bringing together Conservatives and Liberals to try and stop an NDP candidate from taking the mayor's office

Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Feb 11, 2023 • 3 minute read

If Friday night was all about reacting to the shock of John Tory’s resignation, Saturday was about potential candidates testing the waters.

The calls were happening fast and furious between would-be mayors and the political backers who organize campaigns.


Nearly a dozen people — including federal and provincial elected officials, councillors old and new, and a former police chief — are said to be considering a run for the top job in Canada’s largest city.

The job comes with a $202,000 per year salary, a host of perks and the newly-awarded strong mayors powers. Those powers give the mayor tremendous control over the city’s more than $16 billion budget and it’s 41,000 employees.

It’s a big job that requires the right candidate, hopefully not one from the NDP side of council.


Among prospective candidates sitting on the centre to centre-right of the spectrum, the discussion Saturday was often about finding a candidate who could unite as many Liberal and Conservative voters as possible to top the next mayor being an NDP flag carrier.

With names like NDP aligned Toronto-St. Paul’s Councillor Josh Matlow being floated, there is a determination to ensure there is a candidate to beat him. In addition to Matlow, University-Rosedale Councillor Mike Layton’s name has been mentioned as well as former councillor turned George Brown College executive Joe Cressy.

Former councillor and deputy mayor Ana Bailão, a left leaning Liberal has also been approached by several people and is taking calls on the matter.



Among those in the centre to centre-right — let’s call them the candidates of sanity — several people have been receiving encouraging calls.

Stan Cho, currently Ontario’s Associate Minister of Transportation, has been approached by a group of campaign veterans that includes federal Conservatives and Ontario Liberals asking him to consider a run. A former realtor, entrepreneur and corporate auditor before politics, Cho currently represents Willowdale in the Ontario Legislature.

Councillor Brad Bradford, who represents Beaches-East York at City Hall, has also received support from both Liberal and Conservative campaign veterans interested in seeing him replace John Tory. Bradford worked as an urban planner before entering politics and was part of Tory’s voting coalition on council.


Former Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders is being encouraged to consider entering the race. Saunders ran unsuccessfully for the Ford PCs in June’s Ontario election in the riding of Don Valley West. With crime being a major issue in the city, a former police chief entering the race would put the spike in violent crime front and centre.

Former councillor Josh Colle, who served from 2010 to 2018, is looking to see if there is a path for him to enter the race and win. Colle served as chair of the TTC from 2014-18 and on the board of Toronto Hydro while on council. His former seat is now held by his father Michael Colle.

There is one name circulating that doesn’t want to be out there, former Ontario cabinet minister Rod Phillips. Phillips left cabinet and resigned his seat in the legislature just over a year ago. But despite being courted as a mayoral candidate, he is said not to be interested.


Among those considering a run on the side of sanity, Cho and Bradford are the two with the most experienced organizers rallying to their sides even though neither has entered the race.

Two federal Liberal MPs have also had their names bandied about. Michael Coteau, the MP for Don Valley East, and James Maloney, the MP for Etobicoke-Lakeshore, have both been approached by supporters to consider a run.

Given the size and economic power of Toronto, and the newly-awarded strong mayor powers, you can expect Premier Doug Ford to keep a close eye on this race. Whether he lends support or endorses any particular candidate is still up in the air.

blilley@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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At least spammy cares about Tory .
Apparently
im not a fan of tory or any politician. its the main thing that they are talking about on the news. i was under the impression that the board was republican/conservative. someone else posted a duplicate thread so i thought there was some interest. perhaps the majority of posters live outside of toronto and ontario? :confused:
 

The_Foxer

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I find it an interesting story, but i figured i'd wait till you got posting stories about it out of your system. No point talking about it if anything you post is going to be buried :)

I mean, the guy's 68 so you gotta hand it to him. Being able to pull young chicks at that age is relatively impressive. Although clearly he was in violation of the '6-ft in the workplace" rule during covid.

The one thing that i haven't seen yet is WHY he came forward and admitted this. I'm wondering if he was being extorted and decided to lean into it rather than cave, or if it was one of those cases where a reporter found out and gave him a chance to spill it himself before he broke the story or something.

The fact no one's asked is kind of telling for me.
 
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pgs

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im not a fan of tory or any politician. its the main thing that they are talking about on the news. i was under the impression that the board was republican/conservative. someone else posted a duplicate thread so i thought there was some interest. perhaps the majority of posters live outside of toronto and ontario? :confused:
What ten consecutive posts without a bite doesn’t give you a hint ?
 
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