Hamas attacks Israel

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,793
8,384
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
All the news services that do say that Israel has retaliated against Iran…all only site that ABC News said it happened…& nothing else. Weird.
Israeli missiles have hit a site in Iran,ABC News reported late on Thursday, citing a US official.
  • Israel has launched a missile attack against a site in Iran, according to US broadcaster ABC News
Israel, early Friday morning local time, launched missiles in a retaliatory strike against Iran, a senior U.S. official told ABC News.
A U.S. official confirmed to ABC News that Israeli missiles have hit a site in Iran.
Israel has launched a strike against Iran in retalation for its weekend attack, ABC News reported Thursday night, quoting a senior US official.
Israeli missiles hit at least one site in Iran, and several explosions were heard across the country, ABC News reported, citing US officials.

Anyone hear anything independent of just “ABC News said so” regarding this?

"In case of any use of force by the Israeli regime and violating our sovereignty, the Islamic Republic of Iran will not hesitate a bit to assert its inherent rights to give a decisive and proper response to it to make the regime regret its actions," said Iran's Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian Nahasapeemapetilon Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.

His remarks came after an Iranian Revolutionary Guards commander said earlier on Thursday that Iran could review its "nuclear doctrine" following Israeli threats.

Hours after Hossein Amirabdollahian Nahasapeemapetilon Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious’s comments, an explosion was heard close to the airport in the central Iranian city of Isfahan, Iran’s semi-official FARS news agency reported early Friday, citing local sources. The cause of this explosion is unclear.

So something happened at this Iranian airport, they don’t know or won’t say what happened, and ABC News said it was Israel, and everyone else is just saying that ABC news said that it was Israel. That’s almost all I can find at this point.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,793
8,384
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Much remained unclear about the circumstances in Iran the early hours of Friday morning. Iranian media and social media reported explosions near Isfahan, where Iran has nuclear facilities and a drone factory.

It said air-defense systems were activated in provinces across the country in response to a suspicious object in the sky. State-media reports attributed the explosions to air-defense fire.

It also reported flights across the country were put on hold.

Israel’s military didn’t reply to requests for comment on the reports.
An Israeli missile has hit Iran, US officials have told the BBC's partner station CBS News. Isfahan province is home to a large air base, a major missile production complex and several nuclear sites.
???????????
???????????
???????????
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,054
11,695
113
Low Earth Orbit
Much remained unclear about the circumstances in Iran the early hours of Friday morning. Iranian media and social media reported explosions near Isfahan, where Iran has nuclear facilities and a drone factory.

It said air-defense systems were activated in provinces across the country in response to a suspicious object in the sky. State-media reports attributed the explosions to air-defense fire.

It also reported flights across the country were put on hold.

Israel’s military didn’t reply to requests for comment on the reports.
An Israeli missile has hit Iran, US officials have told the BBC's partner station CBS News. Isfahan province is home to a large air base, a major missile production complex and several nuclear sites.
???????????
???????????
???????????
Expect a tonne of bullshit. Neither Israel or Iran are truthful.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ron in Regina

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,793
8,384
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Expect a tonne of bullshit. Neither Israel or Iran are truthful.
On that note, is anybody Actually stating anything? Did Israel say they retaliated? Is Iran stating Israel retaliated? Is this a car backfiring in Butte & a circus elephant briefly running away? Any damage or actual evidence that anything actually happened?
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

Satelitte Radio Addict
May 28, 2007
14,674
2,412
113
Toronto, ON
On that note, is anybody Actually stating anything? Did Israel say they retaliated? Is Iran stating Israel retaliated? Is this a car backfiring in Butte & a circus elephant briefly running away? Any damage or actual evidence that anything actually happened?

The US said it happened.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,054
11,695
113
Low Earth Orbit
On that note, is anybody Actually stating anything? Did Israel say they retaliated? Is Iran stating Israel retaliated? Is this a car backfiring in Butte & a circus elephant briefly running away? Any damage or actual evidence that anything actually happened?
Allegedly hit an airfield.....with quadcopter drones. S300 and S400s took them out says Iran.

 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,054
11,695
113
Low Earth Orbit
COUNTER STRIKE Israel strike may have been carried out by Mossad INSIDE Iran – it was about more than sending a message, says expert

Watch The Sun's Nick Parker break down last night's events in the video above
Ellie DoughtyDavid Ross
Published: 6:52 ET, Apr 19 2024Updated: 10:03 ET, Apr 19 2024


ISRAEL'S strike on Iran could have been carried out by Tel Aviv spies as a way to send more than just a message of revenge, experts told The Sun.

Middle East analyst Yakov Katz and former British Army General Rupert Jones said the attack could have been carried out by Israel's Mossad agency from inside Iran."

 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,259
3,091
113
Anti-Israel protesters becoming more radical, openly embracing terror groups
Palestine Action's 'underground manual' illustrates how extreme they have become

Author of the article:Warren Kinsella
Published Apr 20, 2024 • Last updated 13 hours ago • 4 minute read

The anti-Israel side is getting more aggressive, experts and police agencies warn.


And, now, some groups are openly embracing terror groups and their tactics – and becoming far more radical.


This week, Western democracies were provided with more evidence.

On Monday, Chicago’s O’Hare airport was shut down by anti-Israel and anti-democracy protests – as was a super-highway near Los Angeles, a bridge to New York City, major streets in downtown Ottawa and Vancouver’s vital container port.

Around the same time, dozens of anti-Israel protesters occupied Google offices in three different U.S. cities, and more than 100 “pro-Palestine” students at New York’s Columbia University were arrested for criminal trespass.

And, now, a document has surfaced that suggests some of these groups are gravitating towards crime and terrorist tactics to advance their anti-Israel, anti-democracy cause. Provided to this newspaper confidentially by a source, the “underground manual” was created by Palestine Action, a network of groups that use what they call “direct action” against individuals and organizations who are believed to support Israel.


The cover of the underground manual created by Palestine Action.
The cover of the underground manual created by Palestine Action. Toronto Sun
Founded in 2020 and most active in Britain, Palestine Action has been at the forefront of an increasingly-radicalized global movement. And its “underground manual” shows groups that oppose the Jewish state are increasingly embracing violence and vandalism.

In emails, the group admitted to this writer that it authored the manual but refused to discuss its contents.

A sampling of excerpts from the document, which now forms part of prosecutions of Palestine Action members in the U.K.:

– Like past terror groups – such as Germany’s Red Army Faction, Abu Nidal or the Irish Republican Army – Palestine Action members are strongly encouraged to form “cells” of just a few members to reduce infiltration and “to make it more secure.”


– The manual then urges the cells to “pick your target,” most often, anyone who “enables and profits from the Israeli weapons industry.” Some companies are suggested, such as Elbit Systems, Rafael or Teledyne.

– Palestine Action then calls on cell members to “prepare for action” and do what it refers to as “recce” (reconnaissance), even advising “borrowing someone’s dog” for a walk to avoid looking suspicious. Extremists are counselled to map out where closed circuit cameras are located, as well as fencing, barbed wire, access points, alarms, and how far the police are from the target.

– Next, cells are advised to “plan action.” Among the suggested actions are “smashing windows and exterior equipment,” blocking companies’ external pipes, including using concrete, as anti-Israel protesters did on railway tracks in Toronto this week. This “will cause disruption for the target,” the manual states.


– “Break-ins” are also advised by Palestine Action because “breaking into your target and damaging the contents inside is obviously a very effective tactic.” Cells are advised to map out escape routes well in advance, using a variety of means. Cells are also told to use only cash when “buying equipment, whether it’s spray paints or sledgehammers,” and never to leave a “paper or digital trail.”

– Meanwhile, as we have seen in protests across Canada and the West, “face coverings are key,” warns Palestine Action. “Do not have your face [visible] at any point during the action. Balaclava is best for this. This might seem pedantic, but cops are obsessed with [shoes]. Don’t wear shoes that you’ve worn when arrested on an action or at a protest, or that are all over your social media.” The manual also urges followers to cover the entire bodies to ensure tattoos or birthmarks are not observed.


– In all-caps, Palestine Actions warns: “WHEN TAKING ACTION, NEVER LEAVE ANYTHING BEHIND. ABSOLUTELY NOTHING APART FROM PAINT AND DESTRUCTION. THE POLICE MAY TRY TO FORENSICALLY ANALYZE ANY ITEMS WHICH ARE LEFT, SO DON’T LEAVE ANYTHING.”

– Extremists are advised to methodically record every “action,” and share with other extremists, mainly to intimidate their targets. Only untraceable “burner phones” should be used, they say, all digital identifiers should be removed, and Palestine Action should receive a copy.

– If caught, Palestine Action members are given the names of lawyers to represent them, apparently at no cost, and offered the assistance of “our dedicated support team throughout the legal process.”


When the “action” is over, followers are encouraged to “destroy all evidence” – and to avoid “bragging, gossip and loose words [which] are often how things become undone … that sort of behaviour should be avoided and called out if you come across it in your cell.”

So, as experts and police note, anti-Israel and anti-Western groups are becoming bolder and more aggressive – and more extreme.

Palestine Action’s “underground manual” is just one more example of how extreme they have become.
1713683050714.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,259
3,091
113
Speaker of Ontario legislature stands by keffiyeh ban
But Premier Doug Ford and all opposition parties seek to have the decision reversed

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Allison Jones and Liam Casey
Published Apr 18, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

The Speaker of Ontario’s legislature is standing by a ruling that bans people in the building from wearing keffiyehs, which he says are being worn to make a political statement, even after the premier and all opposition parties asked him to reverse it.


The legislature has a long-standing rule that members can’t use props, signage or accessories intended to express a political statement, and Speaker Ted Arnott said after “extensive research” he has concluded keffiyehs meet that definition.


“It’s extremely politically sensitive, obviously, but procedurally I believe I made the right decision in the sense of past rulings of speakers and precedents and traditions,” Arnott said Thursday after question period.

“In my opinion, having done the research, it appeared to me that the keffiyeh is being worn to make a political statement.”

A keffiyeh is a checkered scarf typically worn in Arab cultures that has come to symbolize solidarity with Palestinians.

Members of provincial parliament often ask special permission to wear an item that may break the rules, such as ribbons for a particular cause’s awareness day, and they do that by seeking unanimous consent of the legislature.



NDP Leader Marit Stiles moved a unanimous consent motion Thursday morning saying the keffiyeh is a culturally significant clothing item in Palestinian, Muslim and Arab communities and should be allowed in the house, but Arnott said he heard a few people say “no.”

The loudest “no” came from Progressive Conservative backbencher Robin Martin.

“I think (Arnott’s ruling) is the correct decision, in the same way we can’t use other kinds of political clothing,” Martin said after question period.

“We can’t wear T-shirts that say, ‘Free the hostages’ or wrap ourselves in a flag or whatever. We have to follow the rules of the legislature. Otherwise, we politicize the entire debate inside the legislature and that’s not what it’s about … we use our words to persuade, not our items of clothes.”


Martin’s position is in contrast to her leader’s, with Premier Doug Ford calling on the Speaker to reverse his decision.

“It really comes down to uniting Ontarians and communities,” the premier said Thursday morning at an unrelated press conference. “We see the division right now that’s going on. It’s not healthy, and this will just divide the community even more.”

Stiles said she was disappointed her motion didn’t pass and pressed the government to act.

“I think the premier needs to now make sure that his caucus does the right thing,” she said.

The issue came to Stiles’ attention last week when one of her staffers, who wears a keffiyeh every day, had to remove it before entering the building.


The Legislative Protective Service told the staffer to remove the keffiyeh, she said.

“The keffiyeh is worn by Muslims, Arabs, Palestinians, it is cultural attire, just like so many other things are,” Stiles said.

“And we live in a diverse province, and people, I think, have a right to wear their cultural heritage, their cultural attire and show their pride in their heritage.”

Ford needs to show some leadership to fix the issue, said Liberal parliamentary leader John Fraser.

“The premier needs to say to his house leader, ‘I’m putting forward a motion,’ and when they put forward the motion, we’ll all be there to support it,” Fraser said.

“We can’t continue to debate this, we have other more important things to talk about.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,259
3,091
113
Rules on clothing in legislatures are in place to stop division
The Speaker's ruling on the keffiyeh isn't divisive, it's the opposite of that


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Apr 19, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

The rules around what is acceptable to wear in parliament come from a time when political divisions were deeper than they are now.


It’s too bad that so many people, especially in the media or political establishment, don’t understand this before they pronounce on an issue, like the keffiyeh.


The decision of Ted Arnott, Speaker of the Ontario legislature, to say that the wearing of a keffiyeh is not allowed has been described as a ban. In reality, it is the upholding of the rules that were put in place to allow parliament to function instead of boiling over into partisan and sectarian battles.

In Canada’s early days we were bringing together a collection of communities – English, French, Irish, Catholic, Protestant. Those divisions may seem small now but our first political assassination in Canada was Thomas D’Arcy McGee, an Irish immigrant, MP and member of Sir John A. Macdonald’s government, who was killed for being on the wrong side of an issue, according to the gunman.


So, we have rules in parliament, be it the House of Commons or provincial legislatures, on how to behave in order to pave over differences enough to allow for civilized debate. This includes not being allowed to call your political opponent names — like not being allowed to call them a liar even when they are lying through their teeth.

It’s all an attempt to promote civil discourse, this also extends to how members of a legislature are allowed to dress.

Roman Catholic priests elected to the House of Commons have had to seek permission to wear their clerical collar rather than a shirt and tie. Those of Scottish heritage are normally granted permission, if requested, to wear a kilt on Robbie Burns Day, but it’s not a given.


Generally, though, wearing anything that can be construed as political in any way is forbidden.

This includes MPs or MPPs wearing a daffodil to support the Canadian Cancer Society in April or a member of the legislature wearing a local junior hockey team jersey during a playoff run. Each of those requires the consent of the legislature before it can happen.

In fact, when you see MPs or MPPs wearing a particular ribbon on their lapel during question period for a specific cause, even as wholesome as cancer research, it’s because the members of the legislature agreed to this ahead of time.

These rules, in place over generations, were instituted to ensure the debate in the legislature remained focused on the task at hand and wasn’t enflamed by divisive symbols. An MP or MPP wearing a Freemason’s apron or Orangeman’s sash and bowler hat would have not only been offensive to Irish and French Catholics years ago, it could have led to violence inside and outside of the legislature.


Wearing a keffiyeh post Oct. 7, as many MPs in Ottawa have, or as some have done at Queen’s Park, is purely a political statement and should not be allowed under the rules. This is especially true because the people wearing them are not Palestinian, they are not Arabs, they are wearing them to make a political statement of solidarity.

That is what the rules are designed to prevent.



This isn’t an attack on Palestinians or Muslims, this is the equal application of rules that have been applied to other cultures and religions beforehand.

We shouldn’t upend our system over false claims of bigotry.

If these rules are changed, or if they continue to be flaunted in Ottawa under Speaker Greg Fergus, then there will be no ability to enforce the rules at all. All political statements using clothing or props will be allowed.

That isn’t a road we want to go down. Speaker Arnott’s ruling isn’t divisive, it’s the opposite of that.

blilley@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,259
3,091
113
Speaker of Ontario legislature stands by keffiyeh ban
But Premier Doug Ford and all opposition parties seek to have the decision reversed

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Allison Jones and Liam Casey
Published Apr 18, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

The Speaker of Ontario’s legislature is standing by a ruling that bans people in the building from wearing keffiyehs, which he says are being worn to make a political statement, even after the premier and all opposition parties asked him to reverse it.


The legislature has a long-standing rule that members can’t use props, signage or accessories intended to express a political statement, and Speaker Ted Arnott said after “extensive research” he has concluded keffiyehs meet that definition.


“It’s extremely politically sensitive, obviously, but procedurally I believe I made the right decision in the sense of past rulings of speakers and precedents and traditions,” Arnott said Thursday after question period.

“In my opinion, having done the research, it appeared to me that the keffiyeh is being worn to make a political statement.”

A keffiyeh is a checkered scarf typically worn in Arab cultures that has come to symbolize solidarity with Palestinians.

Members of provincial parliament often ask special permission to wear an item that may break the rules, such as ribbons for a particular cause’s awareness day, and they do that by seeking unanimous consent of the legislature.



NDP Leader Marit Stiles moved a unanimous consent motion Thursday morning saying the keffiyeh is a culturally significant clothing item in Palestinian, Muslim and Arab communities and should be allowed in the house, but Arnott said he heard a few people say “no.”

The loudest “no” came from Progressive Conservative backbencher Robin Martin.

“I think (Arnott’s ruling) is the correct decision, in the same way we can’t use other kinds of political clothing,” Martin said after question period.

“We can’t wear T-shirts that say, ‘Free the hostages’ or wrap ourselves in a flag or whatever. We have to follow the rules of the legislature. Otherwise, we politicize the entire debate inside the legislature and that’s not what it’s about … we use our words to persuade, not our items of clothes.”


Martin’s position is in contrast to her leader’s, with Premier Doug Ford calling on the Speaker to reverse his decision.

“It really comes down to uniting Ontarians and communities,” the premier said Thursday morning at an unrelated press conference. “We see the division right now that’s going on. It’s not healthy, and this will just divide the community even more.”

Stiles said she was disappointed her motion didn’t pass and pressed the government to act.

“I think the premier needs to now make sure that his caucus does the right thing,” she said.

The issue came to Stiles’ attention last week when one of her staffers, who wears a keffiyeh every day, had to remove it before entering the building.


The Legislative Protective Service told the staffer to remove the keffiyeh, she said.

“The keffiyeh is worn by Muslims, Arabs, Palestinians, it is cultural attire, just like so many other things are,” Stiles said.

“And we live in a diverse province, and people, I think, have a right to wear their cultural heritage, their cultural attire and show their pride in their heritage.”

Ford needs to show some leadership to fix the issue, said Liberal parliamentary leader John Fraser.

“The premier needs to say to his house leader, ‘I’m putting forward a motion,’ and when they put forward the motion, we’ll all be there to support it,” Fraser said.

“We can’t continue to debate this, we have other more important things to talk about.”
Rules on clothing in legislatures are in place to stop division
The Speaker's ruling on the keffiyeh isn't divisive, it's the opposite of that


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Apr 19, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

The rules around what is acceptable to wear in parliament come from a time when political divisions were deeper than they are now.


It’s too bad that so many people, especially in the media or political establishment, don’t understand this before they pronounce on an issue, like the keffiyeh.


The decision of Ted Arnott, Speaker of the Ontario legislature, to say that the wearing of a keffiyeh is not allowed has been described as a ban. In reality, it is the upholding of the rules that were put in place to allow parliament to function instead of boiling over into partisan and sectarian battles.

In Canada’s early days we were bringing together a collection of communities – English, French, Irish, Catholic, Protestant. Those divisions may seem small now but our first political assassination in Canada was Thomas D’Arcy McGee, an Irish immigrant, MP and member of Sir John A. Macdonald’s government, who was killed for being on the wrong side of an issue, according to the gunman.


So, we have rules in parliament, be it the House of Commons or provincial legislatures, on how to behave in order to pave over differences enough to allow for civilized debate. This includes not being allowed to call your political opponent names — like not being allowed to call them a liar even when they are lying through their teeth.

It’s all an attempt to promote civil discourse, this also extends to how members of a legislature are allowed to dress.

Roman Catholic priests elected to the House of Commons have had to seek permission to wear their clerical collar rather than a shirt and tie. Those of Scottish heritage are normally granted permission, if requested, to wear a kilt on Robbie Burns Day, but it’s not a given.


Generally, though, wearing anything that can be construed as political in any way is forbidden.

This includes MPs or MPPs wearing a daffodil to support the Canadian Cancer Society in April or a member of the legislature wearing a local junior hockey team jersey during a playoff run. Each of those requires the consent of the legislature before it can happen.

In fact, when you see MPs or MPPs wearing a particular ribbon on their lapel during question period for a specific cause, even as wholesome as cancer research, it’s because the members of the legislature agreed to this ahead of time.

These rules, in place over generations, were instituted to ensure the debate in the legislature remained focused on the task at hand and wasn’t enflamed by divisive symbols. An MP or MPP wearing a Freemason’s apron or Orangeman’s sash and bowler hat would have not only been offensive to Irish and French Catholics years ago, it could have led to violence inside and outside of the legislature.


Wearing a keffiyeh post Oct. 7, as many MPs in Ottawa have, or as some have done at Queen’s Park, is purely a political statement and should not be allowed under the rules. This is especially true because the people wearing them are not Palestinian, they are not Arabs, they are wearing them to make a political statement of solidarity.

That is what the rules are designed to prevent.



This isn’t an attack on Palestinians or Muslims, this is the equal application of rules that have been applied to other cultures and religions beforehand.

We shouldn’t upend our system over false claims of bigotry.

If these rules are changed, or if they continue to be flaunted in Ottawa under Speaker Greg Fergus, then there will be no ability to enforce the rules at all. All political statements using clothing or props will be allowed.

That isn’t a road we want to go down. Speaker Arnott’s ruling isn’t divisive, it’s the opposite of that.

blilley@postmedia.com
isnt that the same word that trump posted sometime ago? ;)
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,793
8,384
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Israeli leaders thanked the United States after the House passed a foreign aid bill Saturday that provides $26.4 billion in military aid to Israel and humanitarian assistance, including some for Gaza.

Calling it a “much appreciated” step, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on X that the measure “demonstrates strong bipartisan support for Israel and defends Western civilization.” Israeli President Isaac Herzog thanked members of Congress and President Biden: “When the U.S. is strong, Israel is stronger; when Israel is strong, the U.S. is more secure,” he wrote in a statement.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
56,034
7,292
113
Washington DC
For once the Party of Cut and Run did the right thing. We'll see how much damage their delay, bickering, and posturing will cause over the next few months.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,905
1,770
113
Anti-Israel protesters becoming more radical, openly embracing terror groups
Palestine Action's 'underground manual' illustrates how extreme they have become

Author of the article:Warren Kinsella
Published Apr 20, 2024 • Last updated 13 hours ago • 4 minute read

The anti-Israel side is getting more aggressive, experts and police agencies warn.


And, now, some groups are openly embracing terror groups and their tactics – and becoming far more radical.


This week, Western democracies were provided with more evidence.

On Monday, Chicago’s O’Hare airport was shut down by anti-Israel and anti-democracy protests – as was a super-highway near Los Angeles, a bridge to New York City, major streets in downtown Ottawa and Vancouver’s vital container port.

Around the same time, dozens of anti-Israel protesters occupied Google offices in three different U.S. cities, and more than 100 “pro-Palestine” students at New York’s Columbia University were arrested for criminal trespass.

And, now, a document has surfaced that suggests some of these groups are gravitating towards crime and terrorist tactics to advance their anti-Israel, anti-democracy cause. Provided to this newspaper confidentially by a source, the “underground manual” was created by Palestine Action, a network of groups that use what they call “direct action” against individuals and organizations who are believed to support Israel.


The cover of the underground manual created by Palestine Action.
The cover of the underground manual created by Palestine Action. Toronto Sun
Founded in 2020 and most active in Britain, Palestine Action has been at the forefront of an increasingly-radicalized global movement. And its “underground manual” shows groups that oppose the Jewish state are increasingly embracing violence and vandalism.

In emails, the group admitted to this writer that it authored the manual but refused to discuss its contents.

A sampling of excerpts from the document, which now forms part of prosecutions of Palestine Action members in the U.K.:

– Like past terror groups – such as Germany’s Red Army Faction, Abu Nidal or the Irish Republican Army – Palestine Action members are strongly encouraged to form “cells” of just a few members to reduce infiltration and “to make it more secure.”


– The manual then urges the cells to “pick your target,” most often, anyone who “enables and profits from the Israeli weapons industry.” Some companies are suggested, such as Elbit Systems, Rafael or Teledyne.

– Palestine Action then calls on cell members to “prepare for action” and do what it refers to as “recce” (reconnaissance), even advising “borrowing someone’s dog” for a walk to avoid looking suspicious. Extremists are counselled to map out where closed circuit cameras are located, as well as fencing, barbed wire, access points, alarms, and how far the police are from the target.

– Next, cells are advised to “plan action.” Among the suggested actions are “smashing windows and exterior equipment,” blocking companies’ external pipes, including using concrete, as anti-Israel protesters did on railway tracks in Toronto this week. This “will cause disruption for the target,” the manual states.


– “Break-ins” are also advised by Palestine Action because “breaking into your target and damaging the contents inside is obviously a very effective tactic.” Cells are advised to map out escape routes well in advance, using a variety of means. Cells are also told to use only cash when “buying equipment, whether it’s spray paints or sledgehammers,” and never to leave a “paper or digital trail.”

– Meanwhile, as we have seen in protests across Canada and the West, “face coverings are key,” warns Palestine Action. “Do not have your face [visible] at any point during the action. Balaclava is best for this. This might seem pedantic, but cops are obsessed with [shoes]. Don’t wear shoes that you’ve worn when arrested on an action or at a protest, or that are all over your social media.” The manual also urges followers to cover the entire bodies to ensure tattoos or birthmarks are not observed.


– In all-caps, Palestine Actions warns: “WHEN TAKING ACTION, NEVER LEAVE ANYTHING BEHIND. ABSOLUTELY NOTHING APART FROM PAINT AND DESTRUCTION. THE POLICE MAY TRY TO FORENSICALLY ANALYZE ANY ITEMS WHICH ARE LEFT, SO DON’T LEAVE ANYTHING.”

– Extremists are advised to methodically record every “action,” and share with other extremists, mainly to intimidate their targets. Only untraceable “burner phones” should be used, they say, all digital identifiers should be removed, and Palestine Action should receive a copy.

– If caught, Palestine Action members are given the names of lawyers to represent them, apparently at no cost, and offered the assistance of “our dedicated support team throughout the legal process.”


When the “action” is over, followers are encouraged to “destroy all evidence” – and to avoid “bragging, gossip and loose words [which] are often how things become undone … that sort of behaviour should be avoided and called out if you come across it in your cell.”

So, as experts and police note, anti-Israel and anti-Western groups are becoming bolder and more aggressive – and more extreme.

Palestine Action’s “underground manual” is just one more example of how extreme they have become.
View attachment 21875
All involved need to be deported to Palestine.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,905
1,770
113
Speaker of Ontario legislature stands by keffiyeh ban
But Premier Doug Ford and all opposition parties seek to have the decision reversed

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Allison Jones and Liam Casey
Published Apr 18, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

The Speaker of Ontario’s legislature is standing by a ruling that bans people in the building from wearing keffiyehs, which he says are being worn to make a political statement, even after the premier and all opposition parties asked him to reverse it.


The legislature has a long-standing rule that members can’t use props, signage or accessories intended to express a political statement, and Speaker Ted Arnott said after “extensive research” he has concluded keffiyehs meet that definition.


“It’s extremely politically sensitive, obviously, but procedurally I believe I made the right decision in the sense of past rulings of speakers and precedents and traditions,” Arnott said Thursday after question period.

“In my opinion, having done the research, it appeared to me that the keffiyeh is being worn to make a political statement.”

A keffiyeh is a checkered scarf typically worn in Arab cultures that has come to symbolize solidarity with Palestinians.

Members of provincial parliament often ask special permission to wear an item that may break the rules, such as ribbons for a particular cause’s awareness day, and they do that by seeking unanimous consent of the legislature.



NDP Leader Marit Stiles moved a unanimous consent motion Thursday morning saying the keffiyeh is a culturally significant clothing item in Palestinian, Muslim and Arab communities and should be allowed in the house, but Arnott said he heard a few people say “no.”

The loudest “no” came from Progressive Conservative backbencher Robin Martin.

“I think (Arnott’s ruling) is the correct decision, in the same way we can’t use other kinds of political clothing,” Martin said after question period.

“We can’t wear T-shirts that say, ‘Free the hostages’ or wrap ourselves in a flag or whatever. We have to follow the rules of the legislature. Otherwise, we politicize the entire debate inside the legislature and that’s not what it’s about … we use our words to persuade, not our items of clothes.”


Martin’s position is in contrast to her leader’s, with Premier Doug Ford calling on the Speaker to reverse his decision.

“It really comes down to uniting Ontarians and communities,” the premier said Thursday morning at an unrelated press conference. “We see the division right now that’s going on. It’s not healthy, and this will just divide the community even more.”

Stiles said she was disappointed her motion didn’t pass and pressed the government to act.

“I think the premier needs to now make sure that his caucus does the right thing,” she said.

The issue came to Stiles’ attention last week when one of her staffers, who wears a keffiyeh every day, had to remove it before entering the building.


The Legislative Protective Service told the staffer to remove the keffiyeh, she said.

“The keffiyeh is worn by Muslims, Arabs, Palestinians, it is cultural attire, just like so many other things are,” Stiles said.

“And we live in a diverse province, and people, I think, have a right to wear their cultural heritage, their cultural attire and show their pride in their heritage.”

Ford needs to show some leadership to fix the issue, said Liberal parliamentary leader John Fraser.

“The premier needs to say to his house leader, ‘I’m putting forward a motion,’ and when they put forward the motion, we’ll all be there to support it,” Fraser said.

“We can’t continue to debate this, we have other more important things to talk about.”
The joys of multiculti bullshit. Want to dress like wherever you came from? Go back there.