Fentanyl

taxslave

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Nov 25, 2008
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I just provided two credible sources that clearly state it is cheaper. How many sources do you need? Can you discredit my statement with facts?
Medicine Hat implemented the Housing First initiative, and almost eliminated their homeless population, as well as saving the Government money.
Medicine Hat said it eliminated homelessness in 2015. Here’s how the city is working to keep it that way

But now, even in Medicine Hat, which Clugston describes as “arguably the most conservative city in Alberta,” getting people off the streets and straight into homes is considered a win for fiscal conservatives, too.
“It’s costing you in emergency room visits or interactions with first responders, police, paramedics ... It costs $80,000 or maybe $100,000 to keep somebody on the street,” Clugston says. “Versus in Medicine Hat you can house them for maybe $20,000 or $30,000. There’s a cost savings to the taxpayer.”
The fears he used to have about the program haven’t been realized, and Clugston now says other cities should stop making excuses about why Housing First isn’t possible.
“All this Band-Aid stuff, that never works. You’ve got to solve the problem, and that’s the Housing First model.”

source: https://www.thestar.com/calgary/2019/12/22/medicine-hat-said-it-eliminated-homelessness-in-2015-heres-how-the-city-is-working-to-keep-it-that-way.html
Just one that has the facts straight. One has to include all costs, not just the small bit that actually goes to clients. So far you are comparing apples and oranges.
 

taxslave

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It defies logic how some people would rather have higher taxes, and keep people on the streets, where they are more likely to die of addiction, commit crime, and not receive treatment for mental health issues, than save money by having the Government provide a roof over their head, and resources to treat their addictions.
You also still have to get them into the housing. Not always easy and some have zero tolerance for D&A. Then what do you do?
You are on the right track but there is more to it than meets the eye.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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Just one that has the facts straight. One has to include all costs, not just the small bit that actually goes to clients. So far you are comparing apples and oranges.
So your and Captain Morgan's position is that, because all the costs that could possibly be called related to the Housing First initiative haven't been brought in, you're going to declare it a failure (without, of course, doing any cost analysis yourselves)?
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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As expected, a gross misinterpretation yet again.
Congrats on being consistent though
Y'know, I gave it a think, and I decide you're mostly right.

You and tax weren't trying to shoot down the idea, you were levelling a fair criticism at Girth's presentation of the idea.

So. . . you were right, I was wrong.

I apologize. To you too, tax.

When I f*ck up, I 'fess up. I'll congratulate myself on being consistent.
 

captain morgan

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Mar 28, 2009
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A Mouse Once Bit My Sister
Y'know, I gave it a think, and I decide you're mostly right.

You and tax weren't trying to shoot down the idea, you were levelling a fair criticism at Girth's presentation of the idea.

So. . . you were right, I was wrong.

I apologize. To you too, tax.

When I f*ck up, I 'fess up. I'll congratulate myself on being consistent.


In terms of the core issue and possible solutions, I have only an opinion to offer - and I do understand that an opinion is almost as worthless as teats on a bull.

That said, as far as a cost analysis goes, I believe that it's more than fair to judge all the costs related to the short through long term scenarios.

Sadly, the longer that a person struggles with this kind of crippling addiction, the the greater the damage done to their body that (at some point) becomes irreversible... The long term scenario encompasses all of the short term issues and time just adds-on many more issues
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
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It is a complicated problem and I don't believe there is a one size fits all solution. Also other than creating careers for social workers I don't believe we are going to fix the problem putting band aid over band aid. It will require a multi pronged solution and it will have to be national. Right now Vancouver, being run by socialists has become a drug Mecca because they are giving free drugs and safe injection sites to everyone that wants them. No proof of residency required. Despite this the illegal drug trade is doing a rip roaring business even with killing dozens of customers every month.
I think are best chance is legalize drugs but require and provide mandatory rehab. Illegal drug dealers can be put up against the wall and shot with a hot load of their own product.
 

Twin_Moose

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Apr 17, 2017
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Now they are looking for Prov. Gov. money to maintain it

Saskatchewan’s first supervised consumption site opens as overdose deaths spike

Saskatchewan’s first supervised drug consumption site opened quietly on Thursday morning, the front door frequented by camera crews but few clients.

The executive director of Prairie Harm Reduction (PHR), the Saskatoon organization that runs the facility at 1516 20th Street, said a splashy ribbon cutting ceremony didn’t seem appropriate.

“We’ll do the grand opening when we secure that $1.3 million from provincial funding,” Jason Mercredi told Global News in an interview.

PHR, formerly called AIDS Saskatoon, crowdfunded about $50,000 to hire a paramedic after the government declined to fund the site in the most recent provincial budget.

The paramedic will operate the facility from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, serving up to 72 people a day.

“With our limited funding, that’s what we’re able to do at this point in time,” Mercredi said.

In the future, he hopes to have two medical staff on site at all times.

While the full vision for the overdose prevention facility hasn’t been realized, Mercredi said it’s needed now more than ever.

This year is considered one of the deadliest on record for overdoses in Saskatchewan. As of August, the provincial coroners service recorded 40 confirmed and 190 suspected deaths related to overdoses.

The combined total of 230 is up from 171 deaths in all of 2017 and 158 deaths in 2018......More
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Woman, daughter poisoned ex-beau with fentanyl-laced oatmeal: Cops
Custody dispute over young girl sparked murder, investigators claim

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Mar 31, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Heidi Littlefield; Logan Runyon; Robert Walker.
Heidi Littlefield; Logan Runyon; Robert Walker. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /HAMILTON COUNTY
Article content
Francis Kelley suspected there was something wrong with his oatmeal.

He texted his estranged girlfriend Heidi Marie Littlefield, 41, on Jan. 14 and accused the Indiana woman of fiddling with his meal.

Tim Hortons enters 'Hall of Shame' for chemical use
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“Did you do something to the oatmeal that was in my fridge,” he texted her. “You were in my fridge last night and it tasted funny after a couple of bites and now I am light headed.”

She responded: “Who tf (the f***) puts oatmeal in a fridge? I don’t know anything you do or want to! Your life and the stuff you say/do is beyond me.”

Within hours, Kelley would be dead.

And now cops have charged Littlefield with murder and two counts of conspiracy to commit murder in the death of Kelley, 46, at his Carmel, Ind. home.

The pair had been in the midst of a bitter custody battle over their toddler daughter, according to police.

Also arrested were Littlefield’s other daughter, Logan Marie Runyon, 22, and her boyfriend Robert James Walker, 29. Runyon was charged with murder and conspiracy to commit murder. Walker is charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit murder.

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It was Kelley’s ex-girlfriend who raised the alarm after he failed to pick up their daughter for his birthday. She found his body on the couch on Jan. 18.

An autopsy determined his death was a homicide. He had been knocked out by fentanyl then strangled with his favourite tie.

He had also been battered.

Detectives believe a custody hearing slated for Jan. 27 may have precipitated the murder. Kelley alleged that his ex was violating custody time.

A tip from one of Littlefield’s exes revealed that she allegedly paid her daughter’s boyfriend $2,500 to “find someone to kill Fran.”


Littlefield was apparently vocal about Kelley.

“‘He’s better off dead,’ ‘I didn’t mean to kill him last time,’ and ‘I might as well say I did it and just say I’m crazy and pregnant,” one relative quoted her as saying, according to the affidavit.

According to another ex turned stoolie, “Heidi told him that Logan put fentanyl in Fran’s oatmeal sometime on Jan. 14.”

“Heidi advised (her ex-boyfriend) that Heidi and Logan found Fran ‘aspirating’ on the kitchen floor,” states the affidavit. “(Ex-boyfriend) advised that Heidi also mentioned a lanyard around Fran’s neck, and it being involved in the incident.”

As for her daughter’s boyfriend, he allegedly spent the $2,500 on drugs and had no intention of murdering Kelley.

bhunter@postmedia.com
@HunterTOSun
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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DEA seized enough fentanyl in 2022 to kill every person in U.S.
Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Nick Miroff
Published Dec 23, 2022 • 3 minute read

The Drug Enforcement Administration said Tuesday it has seized more than 379 million potentially fatal doses of illegal fentanyl this year, as Mexican drug-trafficking organizations continue to flood the United States with the cheap synthetic opioid responsible for record numbers of U.S. overdose deaths.


The agency said it has confiscated more than 10,000 pounds of fentanyl powder and 50.6 million illegal fentanyl tablets so far in 2022. That was twice the number of tablets seized in 2021, when more than 107,000 Americans died of drug overdoses. Two-thirds of those deaths were caused by fentanyl, according to U.S. public health data.


Anne Milgram, the DEA administrator, said the seizures recorded by the agency this year contained enough fentanyl “to kill everyone in the United States,” home to about 330 million residents.

“DEA’s top operational priority is to defeat the two Mexican drug cartels – the Sinaloa and Jalisco (CJNG) Cartels – that are primarily responsible for the fentanyl that is killing Americans today,” Milgram said in a statement.


A Washington Post investigation published last week found that illegal fentanyl has become the leading cause of death for Americans ages 18 to 49. Fatal overdoses from fentanyl have surged 94 percent since 2019, and the drug now claims more lives in the United States than car accidents, gun violence or suicides, The Post reported.

The DEA seizure numbers released Tuesday represent only a partial count of the volume of illegal fentanyl detected by law enforcement agencies this year. The statistics do not include seizures tallied by U.S. Customs and Border Protection along the southern border, where authorities detected more than 14,000 pounds of illegal fentanyl – a record amount – during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30.


Last month, CBP seized more than 2,900 pounds of the drug along the Mexico border, the highest one-month total ever, according to figures obtained by The Post.

Fentanyl, 50 times more potent than heroin, has become a billion-dollar business for drug cartels that produce the highly addictive narcotic in clandestine laboratories in Mexico. “Most of the fentanyl trafficked by the Sinaloa and CJNG Cartels is being mass-produced at secret factories in Mexico with chemicals sourced largely from China,” the agency said in the news release.

The traffickers typically press the drug into tablets designed to resemble prescription pain pills or blend the fentanyl into the kind of powder mixtures sought by habituated opioid users seeking stronger doses. Some drug dealers in the United States also lace methamphetamine, cocaine and other illegal drugs with fentanyl powder to boost potency and get more customers hooked.


U.S. authorities estimate they are only catching 5 to 10 percent of the illegal fentanyl that crosses the southern border, primarily in commercial trucks and passengers vehicles that arrive at official crossings.

The DEA issued alerts last month warning that 6 out of 10 illegal fentanyl tablets sold on U.S. streets now contain a potentially lethal dose of the drug, up from 4 in 10 last year. U.S. agents and others on the front lines of the crisis said the cartels have boosted the potency of their tablets in response to market demand for stronger and stronger doses from customers who develop an opioid tolerance.

That has made the basic dosage unit – the tablet – even more deadly to a first-time user or someone who does not know they are consuming fentanyl.


Fentanyl pills sold on U.S. streets are often “made to look identical to real prescription medications – including OxyContin®, Percocet®, and Xanax® – but only contain filler and fentanyl,” the DEA said, warning people against trying to buy any of those legal drugs through social media sites.

“Fake pills are readily found on social media. No pharmaceutical pill bought on social media is safe,” the DEA said. “The only safe medications are ones prescribed directly to you by a trusted medical professional and dispensed by a licensed pharmacist.”

The DEA said it has started providing a regularly updated tally of fentanyl seizures to track how much of the drug the agency is confiscating.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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DEA seized enough fentanyl in 2022 to kill every person in U.S.
Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Nick Miroff
Published Dec 23, 2022 • 3 minute read

The Drug Enforcement Administration said Tuesday it has seized more than 379 million potentially fatal doses of illegal fentanyl this year, as Mexican drug-trafficking organizations continue to flood the United States with the cheap synthetic opioid responsible for record numbers of U.S. overdose deaths.


The agency said it has confiscated more than 10,000 pounds of fentanyl powder and 50.6 million illegal fentanyl tablets so far in 2022. That was twice the number of tablets seized in 2021, when more than 107,000 Americans died of drug overdoses. Two-thirds of those deaths were caused by fentanyl, according to U.S. public health data.


Anne Milgram, the DEA administrator, said the seizures recorded by the agency this year contained enough fentanyl “to kill everyone in the United States,” home to about 330 million residents.

“DEA’s top operational priority is to defeat the two Mexican drug cartels – the Sinaloa and Jalisco (CJNG) Cartels – that are primarily responsible for the fentanyl that is killing Americans today,” Milgram said in a statement.


A Washington Post investigation published last week found that illegal fentanyl has become the leading cause of death for Americans ages 18 to 49. Fatal overdoses from fentanyl have surged 94 percent since 2019, and the drug now claims more lives in the United States than car accidents, gun violence or suicides, The Post reported.

The DEA seizure numbers released Tuesday represent only a partial count of the volume of illegal fentanyl detected by law enforcement agencies this year. The statistics do not include seizures tallied by U.S. Customs and Border Protection along the southern border, where authorities detected more than 14,000 pounds of illegal fentanyl – a record amount – during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30.


Last month, CBP seized more than 2,900 pounds of the drug along the Mexico border, the highest one-month total ever, according to figures obtained by The Post.

Fentanyl, 50 times more potent than heroin, has become a billion-dollar business for drug cartels that produce the highly addictive narcotic in clandestine laboratories in Mexico. “Most of the fentanyl trafficked by the Sinaloa and CJNG Cartels is being mass-produced at secret factories in Mexico with chemicals sourced largely from China,” the agency said in the news release.

The traffickers typically press the drug into tablets designed to resemble prescription pain pills or blend the fentanyl into the kind of powder mixtures sought by habituated opioid users seeking stronger doses. Some drug dealers in the United States also lace methamphetamine, cocaine and other illegal drugs with fentanyl powder to boost potency and get more customers hooked.


U.S. authorities estimate they are only catching 5 to 10 percent of the illegal fentanyl that crosses the southern border, primarily in commercial trucks and passengers vehicles that arrive at official crossings.

The DEA issued alerts last month warning that 6 out of 10 illegal fentanyl tablets sold on U.S. streets now contain a potentially lethal dose of the drug, up from 4 in 10 last year. U.S. agents and others on the front lines of the crisis said the cartels have boosted the potency of their tablets in response to market demand for stronger and stronger doses from customers who develop an opioid tolerance.

That has made the basic dosage unit – the tablet – even more deadly to a first-time user or someone who does not know they are consuming fentanyl.


Fentanyl pills sold on U.S. streets are often “made to look identical to real prescription medications – including OxyContin®, Percocet®, and Xanax® – but only contain filler and fentanyl,” the DEA said, warning people against trying to buy any of those legal drugs through social media sites.

“Fake pills are readily found on social media. No pharmaceutical pill bought on social media is safe,” the DEA said. “The only safe medications are ones prescribed directly to you by a trusted medical professional and dispensed by a licensed pharmacist.”

The DEA said it has started providing a regularly updated tally of fentanyl seizures to track how much of the drug the agency is confiscating.
damn. that would have been the perfect opportunity to conquer murica. 🇨🇦 💡 ;)
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Think of it as evolution in action.
With Casino House Odds against someone eating a random “Street Pill” and not getting a potentially lethal dose of this poison on their first roll of the dice. Not sure why someone would accept those odds but assuming it’s a similar reason as to why the 1/4lb burger outsold the 1/3lb burger ‘cuz many thought the 1/4lb was bigger than the 1/3lb???
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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I just don’t understand somebody’s motivation to roll those dice is all. If you need something mind altering, there is safer old school methods that don’t involve death.
Who WOULDN'T believe the sketchy guy in the alley who assures you "Perfectly safe, man. This stuff isn't made made in some basement lab. It's made by a pharmaceutical company for sale in countries where it's legal. I just tapped into a 'misdirected shipment,' y'know?"