Donald Trump Announces 2016 White House Bid

The_Foxer

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Aug 9, 2022
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It's perfectly OK Blah blah deflect deflect,,,,
Wow, i've noticed that generally speaking your efforts to deflect and change the channel are proprtional to how badly you feel about your lack of intelligent argument. You must REALLY feel stupid this time out to be this desperate :)

I wouldn't know anything about your pizza delivery education in the states. I don't think they have that here. But it's great to hear you graduated from SOMETHING. Sorry to hear they didn't go over this with you then.

I guess i get it - claiming that an article about stormy daniels getting paid because stormy daniels slept with trump has nothing to do with stormy daniels obviously would make anyone feel pretty silly. I mean, even the average US pizza delivery school grad wouldn't make THAT bad a mistake :)

Plus - if you DIDN'T try to deflect you might have to actually address the fact that the thousands of hours of failed investigations into trump is basically just a witch hunt on the part of the dems. (hundreds of thousands now? Hard to say) LOL, you're so transparent when you're like this :)

So i get you don't want to talk about it, and feel the need to deflect from your previous ridiculous remarks, But - i think we all can see the truth here.
 

spaminator

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Hunter Biden seeks federal probe of Trump allies over laptop
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Eric Tucker
Published Feb 01, 2023 • 3 minute read

WASHINGTON — A lawyer for President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter, asked the Justice Department in a letter Wednesday to investigate close allies of former President Donald Trump and others who accessed and disseminated personal data from a laptop that a computer repair shop owner says was dropped off at his Delaware store in 2019.


In a separate letter, Hunter Biden’s attorneys also asked Fox News host Tucker Carlson to retract and apologize for what they say are false and defamatory claims made repeatedly about him on-air, including implying without evidence that he had unauthorized access to classified documents found at his father’s home.


The request for a criminal inquiry, which comes as Hunter Biden faces his own tax evasion investigation by the Justice Department, does not mean federal prosecutors will open a probe or take any other action. But it nonetheless represents a concerted shift in strategy and a rare public response by the younger Biden and his legal team to years of attacks by Republican officials and conservative media, scrutiny expected to continue now that the GOP has taken over the House.


It also represents the latest salvo in the long-running laptop saga, which began with a New York Post story in October 2020 that detailed some of the emails it says were found on the device related to Hunter Biden’s foreign business dealings. It was swiftly seized on by Trump as a campaign issue during the presidential election that year.

The letter, signed by prominent Washington attorney Abbe Lowell, seeks an investigation into, among others, former Trump strategist Steve Bannon, Trump’s longtime lawyer Rudy Giuliani, Giuliani’s own attorney and the Wilmington computer repair shop owner, John Paul Mac Isaac, who has said Hunter Biden dropped a laptop off at his store in April 2019 and never returned to pick it up.


The letter cites passages from Mac Isaac’s book in which he admitted reviewing private and sensitive material from Biden’s laptop, including a file titled “income.pdf.” It notes that Mac Isaac sent a copy of the laptop data to Giuliani’s lawyer, Robert Costello, who in turn shared it with Giuliani, a close ally of Trump’s who at the time was pushing discredited theories about the younger Biden.

Giuliani provided the information to a reporter at the New York Post, which first wrote about the laptop, and also to Bannon, according to the letter. Hunter Biden never consented to any of his personal information being accessed or shared in that manner, his lawyer says.

“This failed dirty political trick directly resulted in the exposure, exploitation, and manipulation of Mr. Biden’s private and personal information,” the letter says, adding, “Politicians and the news media have used this unlawfully accessed, copied, distributed, and manipulated data to distort the truth and cause harm to Mr. Biden.”


Mac Isaac declined to comment when reached by The Associated Press on Wednesday evening. Costello, asked to comment on behalf of him and Giuliani, called the letter “a frivolous legal document” and said it “reeks of desperation because they know judgment day is coming for the Bidens.”

A lawyer who represented Bannon at a trial in Washington, D.C., last year did not immediately return a call seeking comment. A Fox News representative had no immediate comment.

The letter to the Justice Department was addressed to its top national security official, Matthew Olsen. It cites possible violations of statutes prohibiting the unauthorized access of a computer or stored electronic communication, as well as the transport of stolen data across state lines and the publication of restricted personal data with the intent to intimidate or threaten.


It also asks prosecutors to investigate whether any of the data was manipulated or tampered with in any way.

“The actions described above more than merit a full investigation and, depending on the resulting facts, may merit prosecution under various statutes. It is not a common thing for a private person and his counsel to seek someone else being investigated, but the actions and motives here require it,” Lowell wrote in the letter.

A Justice Department spokesperson declined to comment.

Separate letters requesting investigations were also sent to the Delaware state attorney general’s office and to the Internal Revenue Service. Spokespeople there did not immediately return emails seeking comment.
 

The_Foxer

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WASHINGTON — A lawyer for President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter, asked the Justice Department in a letter Wednesday to investigate close allies of former President Donald Trump and others who accessed and disseminated personal data from a laptop that a computer repair shop owner says was dropped off at his Delaware store in 2019.
after the bidens had the story supressed and had the tech companies threaten people if they talked about it. The balls on that guy.
 

pgs

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after the bidens had the story supressed and had the tech companies threaten people if they talked about it. The balls on that guy.
He has videos displaying his junk , if interested you can check them out .
 

spaminator

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Ex-prosecutor's new book details fight over indicting Trump
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michael R. Sisak
Published Feb 03, 2023 • 6 minute read

NEW YORK — As the Manhattan district attorney’s office ramps up its yearslong investigation of Donald Trump, a new book by a former prosecutor details just how close the former president came to getting indicted — and laments friction with the new D.A. that put that plan on ice.


Mark Pomerantz, who oversaw the investigation until early last year, writes in “People vs. Donald Trump: An Inside Account” that then-District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. authorized him in December 2021 to seek Trump’s indictment.


After scouring Trump’s life and business, Pomerantz writes that prosecutors agreed on a case involving allegations that Trump falsified records by inflating the value of assets on financial statements he provided lenders.

Vance was leaving office within weeks, but he expressed confidence that his successor, Alvin Bragg, would agree with his assessment, Pomerantz writes. But Bragg and his team had other ideas — expressing trepidation about the strength of evidence and the credibility of a key witness.


They decided not to proceed, at least not with the speed Pomerantz and co-lead prosecutor Carey Dunne wanted. Pomerantz writes. The stagnation compelled both men to leave the office.

“Once again, Donald Trump had managed to dance between the raindrops of accountability,” Pomerantz writes in the book, which is set to be published Tuesday by Simon & Schuster.

The Associated Press and other news outlets received copies of the book Friday.

Trump has threatened legal action against Pomerantz and Simon & Schuster for what he contends are “defamatory statements” and “groundless falsehoods” about his alleged criminal conduct.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing and said the New York investigations are attempts by Democrats to keep him out of the White House.


In a post to his Trump Social platform, Trump said Pomerantz’s book “is turning out to be a hit on the District Attorney and the ‘weak’ case ‘with many fatal flaws.”‘

Pomerantz’s 304-page volume weaves his behind-the-scenes account of the spirited battle over whether to charge Trump with anecdotes from his decades-long career as a mafia prosecutor and white-collar litigator. Those experiences contrast with Bragg’s work as a former federal prosecutor, law professor and, in the years prior to his election, pursuing civil cases against Trump as a top official in the state attorney general’s office.

The book also works to temper the drama surrounding Pomerantz’s split from Bragg, which spilled into the public last year when his resignation letter appeared in The New York Times.


Pomerantz portrays the dispute not as a brawl, but as a legitimate difference of opinion shaped by lengthy Zoom calls and telephone conversations. During the sessions, Pomerantz writes that he and Dunne would detail the pros and cons of pursuing a Trump indictment, while Bragg or members of his team pushed back with questions and concerns.

At first, Pomerantz writes, Bragg seemed overwhelmed by other matters — managing the massive D.A.’s office and dealing with blowback from his approach to prosecuting certain crimes. He writes that Bragg showed up late to an initial meeting where he laid out the case and that Bragg ended up looking at his phone most of the time. The D.A. was more attentive at subsequent sessions, Pomerantz said.


At one point, he writes, Bragg said that he “could not see a world” in which he would indict Trump and call Trump’s long-estranged former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen as a witness.

Cohen, who claims to have intimate knowledge of Trump’s financial dealings, was convicted in a parallel federal case of lying to Congress.

Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, said in a statement Friday: “We were treated respectfully and professionally by Mr. Mark Pomerantz and his team. We appreciated their integrity and hard work. Despite the denied allegations concerning Mr. Cohen’s credibility, I can confirm that Mr. Cohen will continue to cooperate with DA Bragg and his team, speaking truth to power — as he has always done.”

Aside from a few blunt emails he wrote criticizing Bragg’s deliberateness, Pomerantz said his rift with the D.A. was civil.

“There was never any yelling or screaming,” he writes of their final conversation in February 2022. He defended Bragg against people suggesting he had an ulterior motive not to indict, saying that they “had no clue about how these prosecutorial decisions are made or were bloodthirsty for some action against Trump,” Pomerantz writes.

Bragg’s office sought last month to delay the book’s publication, saying in a letter to Pomerantz and Simon & Schuster that he was violating a confidentiality agreement he signed upon joining the D.A.’s office and that the book could “materially prejudice” the investigation. Pomerantz said nothing in the book jeopardizes the probe. Simon & Schuster said it will release the book as scheduled.

In a statement Friday, Bragg said he hasn’t read the book, and “won’t comment on any ongoing investigation because of the harm it could cause to the case.” He defended his decision to refrain from charging Trump.

“After closely reviewing all the evidence from Mr. Pomerantz’s investigation, I came to the same conclusion as several senior prosecutors involved in the case, and also those I brought on: more work was needed. Put another way, Mr. Pomerantz’s plane wasn’t ready for takeoff,” Bragg said. “Our skilled and professional legal team continues to follow the facts of this case wherever they may lead, without fear or favor. Mr. Pomerantz decided to quit a year ago and sign a book deal.”

The District Attorneys Association of the State of New York also expressed concerns, writing in a statement Friday that it was “unfortunate and unprecedented” for a former prosecutor to speak out during an ongoing investigation.

Pomerantz joined the D.A.’s office in 2021 as a special assistant district attorney to lead the Trump probe. He writes that early in his involvement they weighed charging Trump and his company under the state’s version of the federal racketeering law, given the array of tax, fraud and other potential crimes they were investigating.

Pomerantz likened Trump’s cunning, charisma and ability to “stay one step ahead of the law” to that of late Gambino crime family boss John Gotti, whose son, John A. Gotti, he prosecuted while an assistant U.S. attorney.

When he arrived at the D.A.’s office, Pomerantz writes, the investigation was so broad “it seemed unfocused and sprawling.”

In 2021, Pomerantz’s team charged Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, and its longtime finance chief, Allen Weisselberg, with evading taxes on fringe benefits given to company executives, but it was Bragg and his team who saw the cases through, securing Weisselberg’s guilty plea in August and the Trump Organization’s conviction in December. Weisselberg is serving a five-month jail sentence and the company was fined $1.6 million.

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Under Bragg’s direction, the district attorney’s office recently returned to a part of the investigation that had long-ago stalled: payments made to two women on Trump’s behalf in 2016 to keep them quiet about alleged affairs.

Pomerantz portrays the hush-money payments — made or arranged by Cohen — as perhaps the most challenging, legally fraught of the potential cases against Trump.

He writes that while a case could be made that Trump falsified business records by logging Cohen’s reimbursement for one of the payoffs as legal fees, he could only be charged with a misdemeanor under New York law — unless prosecutors could prove he falsified records to conceal another crime.

Vance abandoned the hush-money angle in 2019, pivoting the investigation’s focus to other matters, but Pomerantz said he revisited it when he joined the office in January 2021, looking for a way to make more serious felony charges stick. He considered whether Trump could be charged with money laundering and explored if one of the women who got money, Stormy Daniels, had demanded payment to remain quiet, thereby extorting him.

Pomerantz said the hush-money matter became known around the office as the “zombie” case.

Still, Pomerantz wrote, “Over the months that I and others worked on the case, we developed evidence convincing us that Donald Trump had committed serious crimes,” Pomerantz writes.

Even if a conviction wasn’t a certainty, Pomerantz said he thought they owed it the public to bring the case to trial.

“Losing it would be better than not even trying,” he wrote.
 

spaminator

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National Enquirer, caught in 'catch-and-kill' scandal, sold
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michelle Chapman
Published Feb 06, 2023 • 2 minute read

The National Enquirer, the scandal-plagued tabloid that engaged in “catch-and-kill” practices to bury stories about Donald Trump during his presidential campaign, has been sold.


VVIP is buying the National Examiner and another tabloid, the Globe, from magazine publisher a360 Media in an all-cash deal, though exact financial terms were not disclosed.


In December 2018 the parent company of publications including the National Enquirer, Us Weekly and In Touch admitted to engaging in a journalistically dubious practice known as “catch-and-kill” in order to help Donald Trump become president.

Federal prosecutors revealed at the time that they had agreed not to prosecute American Media Inc. for secretly assisting Trump’s campaign by paying $150,000 to Playboy model Karen McDougal for the rights to her story about an alleged affair with Trump. The company then intentionally suppressed McDougal’s story until after the election.


Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, also accused the paper of attempting to bribe him in 2019 with embarrassing “below the belt” photos sent to his girlfriend.

American Media sold the National Enquirer and some other publications in April 2019 to James Cohen, former head of the airport newsstand company Hudson News. However, the transaction was never completed.

In August 2020 David Pecker stepped down as CEO of American Media. At the time, American Media Inc. was being taken over by Accelerate360, a logistics firm based in Smyrna, Georgia. Under Pecker, the National Enquirer for years buried potentially embarrassing stories about Trump and other favoured celebrities by buying the rights to them and never publishing.

The Federal Election Commission fined a360 Media $187,500 in June 2021 for squashing the McDougal story. The FEC said the publisher’s “payment to Karen McDougal to purchase a limited life story right combined with its decision not to publish the story, in consultation with an agent of Donald J. Trump and for the purpose of influencing the election, constituted a prohibited corporate in-kind contribution.”

VVIP Ventures is a joint venture between digital media and content technologies holding company Vinco Ventures Inc. and ICON Publishing.
 

spaminator

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Meta restores Donald Trump's access to Facebook, Instagram
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Published Feb 09, 2023 • < 1 minute read

Meta Platforms Inc has restored former U.S. President Donald Trump’s access to Facebook and Instagram, Meta spokesperson Andy Stone confirmed on Thursday, following a two-year suspension after the deadly Capitol Hill riot on Jan. 6, 2021.

Meta in January said it would lift Trump’s suspension “in the coming weeks” and would institute heightened penalties of a suspension between one month and two years if the former president violated its content policies again.


Trump now regains access to key platforms for voter outreach and political fundraising ahead of another run for the White House in 2024. He had 23 million followers on Instagram and 34 million on Facebook as of January.
 

spaminator

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Rioter who menaced officer with Confederate flag gets prison
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michael Kunzelman
Published Feb 09, 2023 • 1 minute read

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Delaware man who threatened a Black police officer with a pole attached to a Confederate battle flag as he stormed the U.S. Capitol was sentenced on Thursday to three years in prison.

Kevin Seefried, 53, tearfully apologized for his participation in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot before U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden sentenced him.


“I never wanted to send a message of hate,” Seefried said.

McFadden said it was deeply troubling that Seefried wielded the flagpole as a weapon against the officer.

“Bringing a Confederate flag into one of our nation’s most sacred halls was outrageous,” the judge said.

Justice Department prosecutors had recommended a prison sentence of five years and 10 months for Seefried, a drywall mechanic from Laurel, Delaware.

Seefried and his adult son, Hunter, stormed the Capitol together after attending the “Stop the Steal” rally, where then-President Donald Trump addressed thousands of supporters in Washington. Kevin Seefried was the 12th rioter to set foot inside the building that day, according to prosecutors.

In October, McFadden sentenced Hunter Seefried to two years of imprisonment.

McFadden also convicted the Seefrieds of misdemeanor charges that they engaged in disorderly conduct and illegally demonstrated inside the Capitol. The judge acquitted Hunter Seefried of other misdemeanor charges for clearing a shard of glass from a broken window.

The judge described Kevin Seefreid as the “prime mover” in his family’s decision to travel to Washington on Jan. 6. McFadden rejected the defense argument that the elder Seefried never intended to interfere with the congressional proceedings.

“I find that he knew what he was doing,” McFadden said.

The Seefrieds were the first Capitol riot defendants to get a bench trial on a felony charge. Neither testified.

Nearly 1,000 people have been charged with federal crimes related to the Jan. 6 riot. More than 500 of them have pleaded guilty, mostly to misdemeanors. About 400 have been sentenced, with over half getting terms of imprisonment ranging from seven days to 10 years.
 

spaminator

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Former VP Pence, ex-Trump official subpoenaed in special counsel probes: Reports
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Published Feb 09, 2023 • 2 minute read

WASHINGTON — Former U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and former national security adviser Robert O’Brien have been subpoenaed by the special counsel leading probes into classified documents found at former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence and efforts to overturn the 2020 election result, according to media reports on Thursday.

Pence was issued a subpoena by special counsel Jack Smith, though the nature of the request was not immediately known, ABC News reported, citing sources. The action follows months of negotiations involving federal prosecutors and Pence’s lawyers.


O’Brien has been asserting executive privilege in declining to provide some of the information that prosecutors are seeking from him, according to CNN.

Pence’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Smith’s office declined to comment on both reports from CNN and ABC.


Trump’s former acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf was interviewed by Justice Department lawyers in recent weeks as part of the ongoing special counsel investigation related to 2020 election interference, the report added, citing sources.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland named Smith as special counsel in November to oversee investigations of Trump, shortly after Trump said he would seek the Republican nomination for president again in 2024.

The first probe involves Trump’s handling of highly sensitive classified documents he retained at his Florida resort after leaving the White House in January 2021.

The second investigation is looking at efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election’s results, including a plot to submit phony slates of electors to block Congress from certifying Democrat Joe Biden’s victory.

Grand juries in Washington have been hearing testimony in recent months for both investigations from many former top Trump administration officials.

Last month, Garland named a separate special counsel, Robert Hur, to probe the improper storage of classified documents at President Biden’s home and former office.

In late January, Pence said he was not aware though he takes “full responsibility” after classified documents were found at his Indiana home.

The documents were discovered after a review of his personal records was conducted in the wake of classified material being found at President Joe Biden’s home in Delaware.
 

spaminator

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FBI searching Mike Pence's home in classified documents probe: official
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Sarah N. Lynch
Published Feb 10, 2023 • 1 minute read

WASHINGTON — The FBI on Friday conducted a consensual search at the Indianapolis residence of former Vice President Mike Pence, after classified documents were discovered at his house last month, a Justice Department official told Reuters.


The search comes just a few weeks after Pence’s attorney Greg Jacobs notified the National Archives in a Jan. 18 letter about the discovery of records with classified markings. The records were then turned over to the FBI.


The search of Pence’s home comes as former President Donald Trump and President Joe Biden face investigations by two special counsels over the retention of classified records.

Special Counsel Jack Smith is investigating whether Trump or his associates may have obstructed the Justice Department’s probe into his retention of thousands of government records, several hundred of which were marked as classified, after he departed the White House in January 2021.

The FBI conducted a court-approved search of Trump’s Florida estate on Aug. 8, where they collected about 13,000 records, about 100 of which contained classified markings.

Separately, Attorney General Merrick Garland appointed Special Counsel Robert Hur in January, after Biden’s legal team revealed they discovered classified documents in November at the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, a University of Pennsylvania think tank. Biden had an office there after he served as vice president under Barack Obama and before his presidential election.

Since then, additional records were also found at Biden’s residence in Wilmington.

A third search of Biden’s Delaware beach home earlier this month did not find any additional documents.
 

spaminator

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Trump offers DNA to compare against accuser's dress
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Larry Neumeister
Published Feb 10, 2023 • 2 minute read

NEW YORK — Former President Donald Trump is willing to provide a DNA sample to be compared against stains on the dress of a woman who accused him of rape, though only under certain conditions, his lawyer said Friday.


Attorney Joseph Tacopina told a Manhattan federal court judge in a letter that Trump will turn over the sample as long as lawyers for his accuser, columnist E. Jean Carroll, provide missing pages from a DNA report on the dress first.


Carroll’s attorney, Roberta Kaplan, called that offer a disingenuous effort to delay an April trial and prejudice potential jurors.

She submitted a letter to the judge saying the sudden offer of DNA after Trump refused to provide it for three years was a “legally frivolous delay tactic.”

“The time has come for him to face a jury,” Kaplan wrote, noting that the period when new facts could be unearthed for trial expired in October.


According to a court filing Thursday, Trump and Carroll are both listed as their lawyers’ first possible witnesses at a trial scheduled to start April 24.


Carroll, 79, has sued Trump for defamation and for rape, saying Trump turned a friendly encounter at a luxury Manhattan department store in late 1995 or early 1996 into a violent rape.

She did not speak publicly about it until releasing a book in 2019: What Do We Need Men For?

Trump has insisted the meeting never happened, including during an October deposition, and his lawyer said the same in his latest court filing.

Tacopina said Carroll and her lawyers were trying to gain a publicity advantage by claiming Trump’s DNA is on the dress she wore the night she said she was raped.

“Mr. Trump’s DNA is either on the dress or it is not,” he said.

Tacopina said Carroll’s lawyers have declined to produce a dozen pages of the DNA report they obtained because “she knows his DNA is not on the dress because the alleged sexual assault never occurred.”


Kaplan, though, said Carroll decided to proceed to trial without a protracted battle over DNA evidence after Trump’s repeated refusals to provide a sample.

“There is no DNA evidence in this case, and none will be introduced at trial,” Kaplan wrote.

Her client instead “has amassed powerful proof that Trump sexually assaulted her” without the sample, Kaplan said.

The lawyer said a report by an expert showed there was unidentified male DNA present on the dress Carroll wore when she encountered Trump, but she said it was not an isolated sample of male DNA but rather a mix of DNA that would require complex analysis if the judge permitted the issue to be reopened prior to trial.
 

spaminator

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Trump team turns over more items marked as classified
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Eric Tucker
Published Feb 10, 2023 • 1 minute read

WASHINGTON — Lawyers for former President Donald Trump have in recent months voluntarily turned over to federal investigators additional papers marked as classified as well as a laptop belonging to a Trump aide, a person familiar with the situation said Friday night.


The legal team also provided an empty folder with classified markings, according to the person, who spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press to discuss an ongoing investigation. It was not immediately clear what material was supposed to have been in the folder.


A Justice Department special counsel has been investigating the retention by Trump of hundreds of documents marked as classified at his Florida estate, Mar-a-Lago. FBI agents who served a search warrant at the property in August recovered roughly 100 classified documents, including records classified at the top-secret level. A federal grand jury has been hearing evidence in the case for months. Prosecutors are investigating whether Trump willfully hoarded the material and whether he or anyone else sought to obstruct their probe, court filings show.


ABC News first reported the discovery of the additional documents.

The person familiar with the matter said a handful of pages with classified markings were found during a search weeks ago at the Mar-a-Lago complex that was supervised by the Trump legal team, and were promptly provided to the Justice Department. The documents were found in a box containing thousands of pages, the person said. The Trump legal team had enlisted investigators to search for any other classified documents that had not yet been recovered by the government.

Separately on Friday, the FBI searched the Indiana home of former Vice President Mike Pence and found an additional document with classified markings, following the discovery by his lawyers last month of sensitive documents. FBI officials have also searched the Delaware homes of President Joe Biden after his lawyers found documents with classified markings at his former office in Washington and at his Wilmington property.
 

spaminator

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Georgia judge to release parts of report on Trump's efforts to overturn election
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Joseph Ax
Published Feb 13, 2023 • 3 minute read

Portions of a Georgia special grand jury’s report on Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the state’s 2020 election should be publicly released, but any recommendations on criminal charges will remain sealed for now, a state judge ruled on Monday.


The panel’s findings, which have remained sealed since the final report’s existence was disclosed in January, could potentially serve as the basis for a prosecution of Trump or his associates who attempted to reverse Democratic President Joe Biden’s statewide victory.


Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney said in the order that three parts of the report would be released on Thursday: the introduction, the conclusion and a section in which the grand jury “discusses its concern that some witnesses may have lied under oath.”

But he declined for now to release the full report, including any recommendations as to whether individuals should be charged. He cited concern about the due process rights of witnesses or potential defendants who were not afforded a full chance to respond to allegations during the grand jury process.


“This is particularly true if the grand jury’s final report includes recommendations involving individuals who never appeared before the grand jury and so had no opportunity, limited or not, to be heard,” he wrote. Trump was not subpoenaed and did not testify to the grand jury.

The decision on whether to file criminal charges ultimately lies with Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis. At a court hearing on Jan. 25, Willis told McBurney that charging decisions were “imminent” and urged him to keep the grand jury report under wraps for now to ensure future defendants cannot cry foul.

Willis’ investigation could make Trump the first former U.S. president to face criminal prosecution, months after he launched his bid for the Republican presidential nomination to challenge Biden in 2024.


Trump has denied wrongdoing and accused Willis, an elected Democrat, of targeting him for political gain.

McBurney said he was delaying the report’s partial release until Thursday to give prosecutors time to discuss with him whether any further redactions need to be made.

Willis launched her investigation shortly after a January 2021 phone call in the waning days of Trump’s term, when the president urged Georgia’s top election official to “find” enough votes to deliver him the state. Days later, Trump supporters breached the U.S. Capitol seeking to stop Congress from certifying Biden’s victory.

Biden’s Georgia win, the first for a Democratic presidential candidate in nearly three decades, confirmed the state’s emergence as a political battleground, a status that has been underscored by a series of high-profile Senate races that have helped Democrats maintain a majority in the chamber.

The special grand jury was convened last year at Willis’ request as an investigative tool, in part because it had the authority to subpoena witnesses. The panel did not have the power to issue indictments, though the report may include recommendations; if Willis decides to pursue charges, she would have to seek indictments from a regular grand jury.

Over the course of around seven months, the jurors heard testimony from 75 witnesses, including senior Trump advisers such as attorney Rudy Giuliani and U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham and top Georgia Republicans such as Governor Brian Kemp.

In addition to Trump’s phone call, the wide-ranging investigation has examined a scheme in which an alternate slate of presidential electors falsely affirmed to Congress that Trump, not Biden, had won the state’s electoral votes.

The Georgia probe is among numerous civil and criminal investigations threatening Trump, his family and his associates.
 

spaminator

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Mike Pence to fight special counsel subpoena on 2020 U.S. election
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Jill Colvin And Eric Tucker
Published Feb 14, 2023 • 4 minute read

WASHINGTON — Former U.S. Vice President Mike Pence is planning to fight a subpoena by the special counsel overseeing investigations into efforts by former President Donald Trump and his allies to overturn the results of the 2020 election, according to people familiar with his thinking.


Pence and his attorneys are planning to cite constitutional grounds as they prepare to resist special counsel Jack Smith’s efforts to compel his testimony before a grand jury. They argue that because Pence was serving in his role as president of the Senate on Jan. 6, 2021 as he presided over a joint session of Congress to certify the election results, he is protected from being forced to address his actions under the Constitution’s “speech-or-debate” clause that shields members of Congress.


“I think he views it as essential protection of his Constitutional role,” said Marc Short, a close adviser to Pence who served as his White House chief of staff.

Short compared Pence’s position to the one he took on Jan. 6 when he refused to go along with Trump’s unconstitutional scheme to try to overturn the results of the 2020 election, as well as Pence’s rejection of using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office in the aftermath.


“The vice president of the United State is the president of the Senate and the fact is the functions of Jan. 6 were specific to that role,” he said of Pence, who has been laying the groundwork for a likely presidential campaign that would put him in direct competition against his former boss.

Whether Pence’s arguments will succeed in limiting or altogether avoiding grand jury testimony is unclear, but the Justice Department is expected to oppose those efforts and to make the case that the former vice president’s cooperation is essential for a probe focused on Trump’s actions.

The decision to try to fight the subpoena, which was first reported by Politico, marks a change in posture from Pence, who has cooperated with the Justice Department as it investigates how documents with classified markings ended up at his Indiana home after the end of the Trump administration. He permitted the FBI to search the property last week.


Even if his objection is ultimately rebuffed from the courts, an antagonistic posture could allow Pence to argue that he tried to fight the Justice Department — a potentially useful position in a GOP primary, as many in the Republican base have grown distrustful of federal law enforcement, in part due to Trump’s drumbeat of criticism. And it could delay the special counsel probe, which Smith is working to rapidly advance.

Pence has spoken extensively about Trump’s pressure campaign urging him to reject President Joe Biden’s victory in the days leading up to Jan. 6, including in his book, “So Help Me God.” Pence, as vice president, had a ceremonial role overseeing the counting of the Electoral College vote, but did not have the power to impact the results.

Pence’s decision to resist the subpoena also came after extensive back-and-forth between his lawyers and the special counsel’s office, according to a person familiar with the discussions who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the closed-door negotiations.

The Justice Department declined to comment Tuesday on Pence’s plans.

Pence is expected to address the issue in more detail during a visit to Iowa Wednesday as he inches closer to a likely presidential run.

Richard Levy, a constitutional law professor at the University of Kansas, said it is true that the vice president is in a unique position as the technical presiding officer of the Senate, making the officeholder in some respects a member of the chamber.

But he said that not everything a member does is protected by the speech-or-debate clause and it is debatable whether the vice president’s role in certifying the election, which involves a mix of constitutional and senatorial functions, would be protected.

In any event, Pence’s argument would likely serve to limit the scope of his testimony rather than to block it altogether, he said.

“I don’t think the speech or debate clause would be a basis for quashing the subpoena altogether. It would be a basis for objecting to particular questions,” he said.

The subpoena has been an aggressive step from Smith as he continues to investigate efforts by Trump and his allies to remain in power, including the storming of the Capitol building on Jan. 6.

Trump supporters, driven by the lie that the election was stolen, brutally pushed past the police and smashed through the windows and doors while Pence was presiding over the certification of Biden’s victory. The vice president was steered to safety with his staff and family as some in the mob chanted, “Hang Mike Pence!”

While the mob was in the Capitol, Trump tweeted, “Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution.”

A House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack recommended that the Justice Department bring criminal charges against Trump and others over his efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss.
 

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Too late to offer DNA to rebut rape claim
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Larry Neumeister
Published Feb 15, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read

NEW YORK — Former U.S. President Donald Trump missed his chance to use his DNA to try to prove he didn’t rape a longtime magazine advice columnist, a federal judge said Wednesday, clearing away a potential roadblock to an April trial.


Judge Lewis A. Kaplan rejected the 11th-hour offer by Trump’s legal team to provide a DNA sample to rebut claims E. Jean Carroll first made publicly in a 2019 book.


Kaplan said that lawyers for Trump and Carroll had over three years to make DNA an issue in the case and that both chose not to do so.

He said it would almost surely delay the trial scheduled to start April 25 to reopen the DNA issue four months after the deadline passed to litigate concerns over trial evidence and just weeks before trial.

Trump’s lawyer, Joe Tacopina, declined comment on the ruling. Carroll’s attorney, Roberta Kaplan, also declined to comment.

Carroll’s lawyers have sought Trump’s DNA sample for three years to compare it with stains found on the dress Carroll wore the day she says Trump raped her in an upscale Manhattan department store dressing room in late 1995 or early 1996. An analysis of DNA on the dress concluded it did contain traces of an unknown man’s DNA.


Trump has denied knowing Carroll and said repeatedly, and sometimes angrily, that he never raped Carroll and that she was making the claim to stoke sales of her book.

After refusing to provide Trump’s DNA sample, his lawyers recently switched tactics, saying they would provide his DNA if Carroll’s lawyers turned over the full DNA report on the dress.

Kaplan wrote in an order that Trump had provided no persuasive reason to relieve him of the consequences of his failure to seek the full DNA report in a timely fashion.

And the judge noted that the report did not find evidence of sperm cells and that reopening the dispute would raise a “complicated new subject into this case that both sides elected not to pursue over a period of years.”


He said that a positive match of Trump’s DNA to that on the dress would prove only that there had been an encounter between Trump and Carroll on a day when she wore the dress, but that it would not prove or disprove that a rape occurred and might prove entirely inconclusive.

Kaplan added: “His conditional invitation to open a door that he kept closed for years threatens to change the nature of a trial for which both parties now have been preparing for years. Whether Mr. Trump’s application is intended for a dilatory purpose or not, the potential prejudice to Ms. Carroll is apparent.”

The Associated Press typically does not name people who say they have been sexually assaulted unless they come forward publicly, as Carroll has done.
 

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Trump lawyers try to ban 'Access Hollywood' tape from trial
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Larry Neumeister
Published Feb 17, 2023 • 2 minute read

NEW YORK — Attorneys for Donald Trump want to ban from his upcoming civil rape trial the “Access Hollywood” tape in which the former president boasts graphically about how celebrities can molest women.


Trump attorneys Alina Habba and Michael Madaio filed papers in Manhattan federal court late Thursday seeking to block references to the 2005 taped encounter and the tape itself from an April trial stemming from the claims of longtime advice columnist E. Jean Carroll.


They called the tape “irrelevant and highly prejudicial” and said it might unjustly be used to suggest to jurors that Trump had a propensity for sexual assault and therefore must have raped Carroll. They also asked to prevent testimony from two women who have accused Trump of sexual misconduct and to ban references to his campaign speeches.

Carroll, 79, sued Trump in November after New York state temporarily changed laws to allow adult rape victims to sue their abusers, even if the attacks occurred decades ago. A trial is set for April 24, and Trump and Carroll are both expected to testify.


Carroll, a former columnist for Elle magazine, said in her 2019 book What Do We Need Men For? that Trump raped her in late 1995 or early 1996 in the dressing room of Bergdorf Goodman, a luxury Manhattan department store.

Trump has vehemently denied it, sometimes angrily, in public statements.

In an October deposition for the upcoming trial, Trump was dismissive of Carroll’s claims, saying: “Physically she’s not my type,” though he misidentified her as an ex-wife of his when he was shown a photograph.

Carroll’s lawyer, Roberta Kaplan, confronted him with claims that two dozen other women have made against him, asking if any of them are true.

“I would say. I mean, I don’t see any. I mean, you haven’t shown me anything,” Trump responded, according to the transcript.


His answers might increase the relevance of lewd comments he made on the “Access Hollywood” tape, which was revealed just weeks before he won the November 2016 presidential election.

In the tape, he said that sometimes when he sees beautiful women: “I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait.” And he added that, “When you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything,” including grabbing women between their legs.

Afterward, he issued a rare apology, saying the comments were “locker room banter” caught on a hot mic.

In her lawsuit, Carroll said she had a chance encounter with Trump that escalated into playful banter as he asked her to help him pick out lingerie for a friend. She said they teased each other to try on a piece of lingerie and went into the dressing room, where Trump became violent and raped her.

Her lawyer declined to comment Friday.