COVID-19 'Pandemic'

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,077
2,784
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
“In sunglasses and a black beanie, a Canadian man named Michael Jackson…”

Wow, I’m pretty sure this dude had a tough childhood already….& That’s before being crazy enough to abduct his child, etc…

Poor Micheal Jackson in his beanie.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
30,860
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Health Canada approves Pfizer antiviral but supply issues expected

Author of the article:
Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mia Rabson
Publishing date:
Jan 17, 2022 • 10 hours ago • 3 minute read •
77 Comments
Paxlovid, a Pfizer's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pill, is seen manufactured in Ascoli, Italy, in this undated handout photo obtained by Reuters on Nov. 16, 2021.
Paxlovid, a Pfizer's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pill, is seen manufactured in Ascoli, Italy, in this undated handout photo obtained by Reuters on Nov. 16, 2021. Photo by PFIZER /Reuters
Article content

OTTAWA — Health Canada approved Pfizer’s antiviral treatment for COVID-19 Monday which could help cut pressure on the health-care system by preventing high-risk patients from ending up in the hospital.
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But limited supplies of Paxlovid mean the Public Health Agency of Canada is asking provinces and territories to prioritize the treatment for people most at risk of serious illness, including severely immune-compromised patients and some unvaccinated people over the age of 60.

“Canadians should be very happy today to hear that the oral antivirals are beginning to become available in Canada,” chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam said at a virtual briefing Monday.

Health Canada’s authorization means Paxlovid can be prescribed for adults who test positive for COVID-19 on a molecular or a rapid test, who have mild or moderate symptoms and are at high risk of becoming severely ill.

Clinical trials showed the treatment, which helps prevent the SARS-CoV-2 virus from reproducing in an infected patient, was almost 90 per cent effective at reducing hospitalization and death in high-risk patients if given within three days of infection, and 85 per cent if given within five days.
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The medication requires three pills at a time, twice a day, for five days. It is the first oral COVID-19 treatment that can be taken at home to be approved in Canada but Tam admitted there may be some logistical challenges getting the drug to the right people quickly enough.

“It is challenging, there is no doubt it,” Tam said. “First of all, spotting that you may have symptoms and then getting medical attention quickly.”

McMaster University infectious disease specialist Dr. Zain Chagla said supply constraints mean the impact of Paxlovid may be slow, but overall, it should start to help reduce the number of people who are becoming severely ill.

“There is certainly a lot of hope here,” he said.

Canada has a contract to get one million courses of the treatment this year but supply issues are limiting use everywhere it has been approved so far.
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Procurement Minister Filomena Tassi said more than 30,000 courses of the treatment are already in Canada and will be distributed to provinces on a per-capita basis this week.

She said another 120,000 courses of the treatment will be shipped before the end of March. She did not say when the remainder of the one million doses Canada bought will come, nor would she disclose the cost, citing contract confidentiality.

Neither would Pfizer Canada, though Pfizer said in the fall the United States is paying about US$530 per treatment course.

Chagla said it’s difficult to know how many courses would be enough, but he said every one helps, particularly if there are enough available for immune-compromised people for whom vaccines don’t work very well.
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Tam said because of supply constraints the Public Health Agency of Canada is asking provincial and territorial governments to prioritize the highest-risk patients for the medications.

Severely immune-compromised patients, such as transplant recipients, top the priority list. They are followed by unvaccinated people over the age of 80, and then unvaccinated people over 60 who live in long-term care, remote or rural locations or First Nations.

Tam said prioritizing unvaccinated people is scientific and rational because they are at higher risk of severe outcomes.

“I think that as health-care providers, you don’t pick and choose which patients you have coming into the hospital getting treated,” she said.
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Chagla said keeping unvaccinated patients out of hospital is a big help to everyone from a health-care resources perspective, and noted for most patients, being vaccinated means they aren’t at high risk for serious illness.

“Getting two or three doses of vaccine probably are like having Paxlovid in your system all the time (in terms of) preventing people from getting seriously ill,” he said.

The United States Food and Drug Administration authorized Paxlovid for patients as young as 12 years old but Health Canada said the company did not submit any safety or efficacy data for that age group so it can’t be authorized for people younger than 18 at this time.

Health Canada also says the treatment isn’t to be used on patients already in hospital with severe or critical COVID-19 or as a prevention treatment before or after someone is exposed to the virus. It is also not to be given to a patient for more than five days.

It warns there are some potentially severe drug interactions between Paxlovid and other medications prescribed for ailments including prostate cancer and heart problems and narcotics including fentanyl.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
30,860
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China's claim that Omicron came from Canadian mail dismissed as 'ludicrous'

Author of the article:
Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mike Blanchfield
Publishing date:
Jan 17, 2022 • 9 hours ago • 3 minute read •
78 Comments
In this file photo, a postal worker makes his way along a snow-covered street after heavy snowfall in Beijing on Jan. 4, 2010.
In this file photo, a postal worker makes his way along a snow-covered street after heavy snowfall in Beijing on Jan. 4, 2010. Photo by STR /AFP via Getty Images
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OTTAWA — A claim by Chinese health authorities that the Omicron variant of COVID-19 was introduced to a resident of Beijing through a piece of regular mail from Canada was dismissed Monday as being ludicrous and comical.
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A Chinese state-controlled news outlet first reported that the Jan. 7 infection of a Beijing resident was the result of receiving a letter or parcel from Canada that passed through Hong Kong.

The Chinese report attributed that scenario to the deputy director of the Beijing Centre for Disease Control in a briefing, even though organizations such as the World Health Organization and Canada Post say the risk of contracting coronavirus from a piece of mail is low.

Margaret McCuaig-Johnston, a China expert at the University of Ottawa who spent more than three decades in the federal public service working on China issues, said Chinese officials need to familiarize themselves with the latest scientific material on the spread of COVID-19.
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“Unlike the early days, scientists have clarified that it does not stay on surfaces. To suggest that it would be on mail that came over days from Canada is ludicrous,” she said.

Canada Post says that the World Health Organization and the Public Health Agency of Canada have said the risks associated with handling mail, including international mail is low.

“According to the PHAC, there is no known risk of coronaviruses entering Canada on parcels or packages. In general, because of poor survivability of coronaviruses on surfaces, there is a low risk of spread from products or packaging shipped over a period of days or weeks,” says a statement by Canada Post.

“Currently, there is no evidence of COVID-19 being transmitted by imported goods or packages.”
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McCuaig-Johnston said the Chinese allegation shows that its leadership is still angry at Canada after its long-running dispute over the arrest of high-tech executive Meng Wanzhou in 2018, an extradition case that was dropped last year, which allowed her to return to China.

Meng was arrested in Vancouver in December 2018 on an American extradition warrant for allegedly violating U.S. sanctions on Iran. Nine days later, China arrested two Canadian men, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, and accused them of being spies — allegations Canada and dozens of Western allies dismissed as baseless retaliation.

The matter plunged Canada-China relations to an all-time low. The U.S. dropped its extradition case against Meng in September, and she was allowed to go free and return to China. Kovrig and Spavor were repatriated to Canada simultaneously.
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It is not clear whether Canada-China relations have begun any kind of meaningful rebound since that major issue between them was resolved.

McCuaig-Johnston said Chinese President Xi Jinping was personally angered by Meng’s arrest and is likely choosing to target Canada whenever it suits him. She said that could explain this latest innuendo around the Canadian postal system.

“Canada is the country that is targeted, suggesting that we’re still in Beijing’s crosshairs,” she said.

Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos appeared not to be aware of the controversy when asked about it at a press conference Monday.

He said that while he may have his own opinion of why China was making that claim, he deferred to experts on how COVID-19 can be spread.
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“We’ll check with officials and our partners around the world,” Duclos said.

“I think this is something not only new, but intriguing and certainly not in accordance with what we have done both internationally and domestically.”

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole called the Chinese claim “comical” and said it was a reminder that news reports emanating from China can’t be trusted.

O’Toole reiterated his party’s criticism of the government for not conducting a comprehensive national security review of the proposed purchase of a lithium mining development company by a Chinese firm. O’Toole said Canada needs to protect its access to lithium because it is a key ingredient in the batteries for electric vehicles.
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“Canada must safeguard our supply and access to critical minerals like lithium to protect our economy and our competitive advantage,” said O’Toole.

A statement from Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada said all potential acquisitions involving critical minerals are subject to a review by the Canadian security and intelligence community before deciding whether a full-scale national security review is warranted.

The department said it was bound by commercial confidentiality and could not comment on the current case. But in general, it said it can assess individual cases based on the “nature of the mineral deposits” and whether a company has full-scale operations in Canada or is “principally domiciled here for regulatory or other reasons with few local staff or assets.”

The company is question operates a mine that is under exploration in Argentina and is registered in Toronto.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
23,965
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B.C.
Health Canada approves Pfizer antiviral but supply issues expected

Author of the article:
Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mia Rabson
Publishing date:
Jan 17, 2022 • 10 hours ago • 3 minute read •
77 Comments
Paxlovid, a Pfizer's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pill, is seen manufactured in Ascoli, Italy, in this undated handout photo obtained by Reuters on Nov. 16, 2021.
Paxlovid, a Pfizer's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pill, is seen manufactured in Ascoli, Italy, in this undated handout photo obtained by Reuters on Nov. 16, 2021. Photo by PFIZER /Reuters
Article content

OTTAWA — Health Canada approved Pfizer’s antiviral treatment for COVID-19 Monday which could help cut pressure on the health-care system by preventing high-risk patients from ending up in the hospital.
Advertisement
Story continues below
Article content

But limited supplies of Paxlovid mean the Public Health Agency of Canada is asking provinces and territories to prioritize the treatment for people most at risk of serious illness, including severely immune-compromised patients and some unvaccinated people over the age of 60.

“Canadians should be very happy today to hear that the oral antivirals are beginning to become available in Canada,” chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam said at a virtual briefing Monday.

Health Canada’s authorization means Paxlovid can be prescribed for adults who test positive for COVID-19 on a molecular or a rapid test, who have mild or moderate symptoms and are at high risk of becoming severely ill.

Clinical trials showed the treatment, which helps prevent the SARS-CoV-2 virus from reproducing in an infected patient, was almost 90 per cent effective at reducing hospitalization and death in high-risk patients if given within three days of infection, and 85 per cent if given within five days.
Advertisement
Story continues below
Article content

The medication requires three pills at a time, twice a day, for five days. It is the first oral COVID-19 treatment that can be taken at home to be approved in Canada but Tam admitted there may be some logistical challenges getting the drug to the right people quickly enough.

“It is challenging, there is no doubt it,” Tam said. “First of all, spotting that you may have symptoms and then getting medical attention quickly.”

McMaster University infectious disease specialist Dr. Zain Chagla said supply constraints mean the impact of Paxlovid may be slow, but overall, it should start to help reduce the number of people who are becoming severely ill.

“There is certainly a lot of hope here,” he said.

Canada has a contract to get one million courses of the treatment this year but supply issues are limiting use everywhere it has been approved so far.
Advertisement
Story continues below
Article content

Procurement Minister Filomena Tassi said more than 30,000 courses of the treatment are already in Canada and will be distributed to provinces on a per-capita basis this week.

She said another 120,000 courses of the treatment will be shipped before the end of March. She did not say when the remainder of the one million doses Canada bought will come, nor would she disclose the cost, citing contract confidentiality.

Neither would Pfizer Canada, though Pfizer said in the fall the United States is paying about US$530 per treatment course.

Chagla said it’s difficult to know how many courses would be enough, but he said every one helps, particularly if there are enough available for immune-compromised people for whom vaccines don’t work very well.
Advertisement
Story continues below
Article content

Tam said because of supply constraints the Public Health Agency of Canada is asking provincial and territorial governments to prioritize the highest-risk patients for the medications.

Severely immune-compromised patients, such as transplant recipients, top the priority list. They are followed by unvaccinated people over the age of 80, and then unvaccinated people over 60 who live in long-term care, remote or rural locations or First Nations.

Tam said prioritizing unvaccinated people is scientific and rational because they are at higher risk of severe outcomes.

“I think that as health-care providers, you don’t pick and choose which patients you have coming into the hospital getting treated,” she said.
Advertisement
Story continues below
Article content

Chagla said keeping unvaccinated patients out of hospital is a big help to everyone from a health-care resources perspective, and noted for most patients, being vaccinated means they aren’t at high risk for serious illness.

“Getting two or three doses of vaccine probably are like having Paxlovid in your system all the time (in terms of) preventing people from getting seriously ill,” he said.

The United States Food and Drug Administration authorized Paxlovid for patients as young as 12 years old but Health Canada said the company did not submit any safety or efficacy data for that age group so it can’t be authorized for people younger than 18 at this time.

Health Canada also says the treatment isn’t to be used on patients already in hospital with severe or critical COVID-19 or as a prevention treatment before or after someone is exposed to the virus. It is also not to be given to a patient for more than five days.

It warns there are some potentially severe drug interactions between Paxlovid and other medications prescribed for ailments including prostate cancer and heart problems and narcotics including fentanyl.
The science told us antivirals are not effective with Ivermectin, it must be evolving .
 
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B00Mer

Keep Calm and Carry On
Sep 6, 2008
43,461
6,436
113
Rent Free in Your Head
www.getafteritmedia.com
Look I am vaccinated.. my personal choice.. but COVID gets you vaccinated or not..

It should be about personal choice, but to many politicians have shares in big pharma.. they are making millions.

What the goverment needs to focus on is curing people quickly who get this shit COVID, not a JAB.

Just remember, Moderna shares this time last year was only $23 per share.. they are now $204 per share.. so if you purchased 10,000 shares or 100,000 shares like Biden has.. would you say your judgement if conflicted.

This isn't about your health anymore.. it's about their bottom line and taxpayers are on the hook.

Biden’s Inner Circle Maintains Close Ties to Vaccine Makers (theintercept.com)
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
30,860
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'In the name of God, go': U.K.'s Johnson faces demands to resign

Author of the article:
Reuters
Reuters
William James and Alistair Smout
Publishing date:
Jan 19, 2022 • 20 hours ago • 4 minute read •
11 Comments
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks outside Downing Street in London, Jan. 12, 2022.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks outside Downing Street in London, Jan. 12, 2022. Photo by HENRY NICHOLLS /REUTERS
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LONDON — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Wednesday dismissed calls to resign from opponents and some of his own lawmakers, fighting to save his premiership amid a deepening revolt inside his party over a series of lockdown parties in Downing Street.
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Johnson, who in 2019 won his party’s biggest majority in more than 30 years, is now fighting to shore up his authority after a series of revelations about parties in his Downing Street residence during COVID lockdowns.

Johnson has repeatedly apologized for the parties and said he was unaware of many of them.

However, he attended what he said he thought was a work event on May 20, 2020 to which staff had been told to “bring their own booze.” Johnson said on Tuesday that nobody had told him the gathering was against COVID rules.

“I expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take,” Brexit-supporting Conservative lawmaker David Davis told parliament.

Davis cited a quote from a Conservative lawmaker, Leo Amery, to then Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain over his handling of war in 1940: “You have sat there too long for the good you have done. In the name of God, go.”
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Asked directly by an opposition lawmaker if he would resign, Johnson said: “No.”

Toppling Johnson would leave the United Kingdom in limbo for months just as the West deals with the Ukraine crisis and the world’s fifth largest economy grapples with the inflationary wave triggered by the COVID pandemic, with UK inflation rising to the highest level in nearly 30 years.

To trigger a leadership challenge, 54 of the 360 Conservative MPs in parliament must write letters of no confidence to the chairman of the party’s 1922 Committee.

Implored to stay by one supporter, Johnson said he had not yet “sat here quite long enough, indeed nothing like long enough.”

As many as 20 Conservative lawmakers who won their seats at the last national election in 2019 plan to submit letters of no confidence in Johnson, the Telegraph reported. A handful of others have already said they had written such letters.
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An analysis by The Times newspaper showed that 58 Conservative lawmakers had openly criticized the prime minister.

Leading rivals within the Conservative Party include Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak, 41, and Foreign Secretary Liz Truss, 46.

Downing Street lockdown parties – some held when ordinary people could not bid farewell in person to dying relatives – have undermined Johnson’s authority.

Johnson on Tuesday denied an accusation by his former adviser that he had lied to parliament about a lockdown party, saying nobody had warned him the “bring your own booze” gathering might contravene COVID-19 rules.

“As he waded through the empty bottles and platters of sandwiches – he didn’t realize it was a party? Does the prime minister realize how ridiculous that sounds?” Keir Starmer, leader of the opposition Labour Party, told parliament.
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“Every week, the prime minister offers absurd and frankly unbelievable defenses to the Downing Street parties, and each week it unravels.”

Starmer, who welcomed the defection of lawmaker Christian Wakeford who earlier on Wednesday left Johnson’s Conservatives to join Labour, asked Johnson if a prime minister should resign if he had misled parliament.

“My decision is about much more than your leadership and the disgraceful way you have conducted yourself in recent weeks,” Wakeford said.

“I can no longer support a government that has shown itself consistently out of touch with the hard working people of Bury South and the country as a whole.”

Support for Johnson and his party has plummeted after a series of revelations about the parties and other mis-steps.
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His own former spokeswoman resigned after she was captured laughing and joking on camera about how to cast a Christmas party if asked about it by reporters.

Such was the revelry in Downing Street at one event that staff went to a supermarket to buy a suitcase of alcohol, spilled wine on carpets, and broke a swing used by the prime minister’s young son.

The Mirror said staff had bought a wine fridge for Friday gatherings, events that were regularly observed by Johnson as he walked to his apartment in the building.

Johnson has given a variety of explanations of the parties, ranging from denials that any rules were broken to expressing understanding for the public anger at apparent hypocrisy at the heart of the British state.

He said people must wait for the outcome of an internal investigation by a senior civil servant before reaching conclusions.

Opponents have portrayed him as a charlatan who demanded the British people follow some of the most onerous rules in peacetime history while his staff partied.

The growing internal Conservative rebellion was cast as the “pork pie plot” because one alleged rebel lawmaker was from Melton, the home of the Melton Mowbray pork pie. Pork pie is also London slang for a lie.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,176
2,136
113
Edmonton
Kelly Brown, the independent investor and self-proclaimed "accidental and unofficial" COVID data analyst, recently joined me for an update on his ongoing research into COVID-19 data put out by public health authorities.

Kelly was one of the first people in Ontario to bring to light the alarming myocarditis risks showing up in the province's reports on COVID-19 vaccines.

Since his previous presentation to the Toronto Board of Health, which oversees and advises Toronto Public Health, Kelly has observed a 36% increase in myocarditis incidents!

According to Public Health Ontario's own data, nearly half of the reported myocarditis cases are appearing in 12 to 29-year-old males.
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
30,860
1,906
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Czech anti-vax folk singer dies after catching COVID on purpose

Her son says she wanted to obtain a health pass to allow her to visit the sauna and theatre
Author of the article:
Postmedia News
Publishing date:
Jan 20, 2022 • 17 hours ago • 1 minute read •
125 Comments
Czech singer Hana Horka.
Czech singer Hana Horka. Courtesy of Asonance
Article content

A Czech folk singer who was an anti-vaxxer has died after catching COVID on purpose.
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Hana Horka, the vocalist for the band Asonance, died on Sunday after contracting the Delta variant at the age of 57, according to her son Jan Rek.

Horka wanted to catch COVID in order to obtain a health pass to allow her to visit the sauna and theatre, a requirement for people who are unvaccinated in the Czech Republic.

Rek told public radio iRozhlas.cz that his mother made the decision to voluntarily expose herself because Rek and her husband, who were both vaccinated, caught the virus before Christmas.

“She decided to continue to live normally with us and preferred to catch the disease than to get vaccinated,” he said.

Just two days before her death, Horka wrote on social media: “I survived … It was intense. So now there will be the theatre, sauna, a concert … and an urgent trip to the sea.”

Her son said she died after going for a walk and complaining about back pain when she returned.

Rek blamed the local anti-vaccine movement for her death, arguing they had brainwashed his mother against vaccination and had “blood on their hands.”
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
48,737
2,910
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Washington DC
Czech anti-vax folk singer dies after catching COVID on purpose

Her son says she wanted to obtain a health pass to allow her to visit the sauna and theatre
Author of the article:
Postmedia News
Publishing date:
Jan 20, 2022 • 17 hours ago • 1 minute read •
125 Comments
Czech singer Hana Horka.
Czech singer Hana Horka. Courtesy of Asonance
Article content

A Czech folk singer who was an anti-vaxxer has died after catching COVID on purpose.
Think of it as evolution in action.
 
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Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
20,272
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113
Twin Moose Creek
Look I am vaccinated.. my personal choice.. but COVID gets you vaccinated or not..

It should be about personal choice, but to many politicians have shares in big pharma.. they are making millions.

What the goverment needs to focus on is curing people quickly who get this shit COVID, not a JAB.

Just remember, Moderna shares this time last year was only $23 per share.. they are now $204 per share.. so if you purchased 10,000 shares or 100,000 shares like Biden has.. would you say your judgement if conflicted.

This isn't about your health anymore.. it's about their bottom line and taxpayers are on the hook.

Biden’s Inner Circle Maintains Close Ties to Vaccine Makers (theintercept.com)
End stock investing by sitting members of parliament
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,176
2,136
113
Edmonton
Why is it that because there are those who don't want to get vaccinated, they're considered "anti-vaxxers?" I haven't heard any person who refuses to get the vaccination state that they're against vaccines - not one. I hear them saying that it's a choice they've made and if you want to get vaccinated, go for it.

Generalizations and/or assumptions apparently make it true. What a world sigh....
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
48,737
2,910
113
Washington DC
Why is it that because there are those who don't want to get vaccinated, they're considered "anti-vaxxers?" I haven't heard any person who refuses to get the vaccination state that they're against vaccines - not one. I hear them saying that it's a choice they've made and if you want to get vaccinated, go for it.

Generalizations and/or assumptions apparently make it true. What a world sigh....
Says the woman who calls every Liberal a Marxist.
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
30,860
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Ontario receives first shipment of antiviral COVID-19 drug Paxlovid

The drug is initially being prioritized for adults at highest risk

Author of the article:
Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:
Jan 21, 2022 • 16 hours ago • 1 minute read •
12 Comments
This handout file photo provided on Nov. 16, 2021, courtesy of Pfizer, shows the making of its experimental COVID-19 antiviral pills, Paxlovid, in Freiburg, Germany.
This handout file photo provided on Nov. 16, 2021, courtesy of Pfizer, shows the making of its experimental COVID-19 antiviral pills, Paxlovid, in Freiburg, Germany. Photo by Pfizer /AFP via Getty Images
Article content

Health Minister Christine Elliott says the first shipment of an antiviral COVID-19 treatment has arrived in Ontario.
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The oral antiviral drug Paxlovid is meant to protect against hospitalization and death.

Elliott has previously said Ontario was set to receive 10,000 courses of treatment in January, and she says today that the province has secured an additional 400 doses for First Nations communities in the north.

The drug is initially being prioritized for adults at highest risk, including immunocompromised patients.

Ontario is reporting 4,114 people in hospital today with COVID-19 and 590 people in intensive care units.

That’s up from 4,061 hospitalizations reported the previous day and a slightly lower number of people in ICU, down from 594.

The province also reports another 62 deaths related to COVID-19.

Ontario is reporting 7,165 new cases of COVID-19, though Public Health Ontario has said the number is likely higher because of a current policy restricting who can access tests.

More than half of the long-term care homes in the province have active COVID-19 outbreaks.

About 88 per cent of Ontarians aged five and older have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 83 per cent have received two.