Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

spaminator

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Minnesota trooper is charged with murder in shooting of motorist Ricky Cobb II during a traffic stop
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Steve Karnowski And Trisha Ahmed
Published Jan 24, 2024 • 4 minute read
Minnesota-Troopers-Freeway-Shooting
On Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2024, prosecutors charged Minnesota State Patrol Trooper Ryan Londregan with murder and two other counts in the shooting death of Cobb during a stop in July 2023.
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota state trooper was charged with murder Wednesday in the shooting of motorist Ricky Cobb II, who failed to get out of his car during a July traffic stop and took his foot off the brake when officers tried to arrest him.


Trooper Ryan Londregan, 27, was charged with second-degree unintentional murder, first-degree assault and second degree manslaughter in the death of Cobb, a 33-year-old Black man, Hennepin County Attorney Mary Moriarty said at a news conference. She said Londegran’s use of deadly force was not justified.


“As with all Minnesota law enforcement officers, state troopers may only use deadly force when it is necessary to protect a person from a specific identified threat of great bodily harm or death that was reasonably likely to occur. That did not exist in this case. Ricky Cobb II should be alive today,” Moriarty said.

Londregan’s attorney Chris Madel called his client “a hero,” saying Londregan was trying to protect himself and a fellow trooper. Madel immediately filed papers seeking to have the case dismissed or at least to have Moriarty removed from the case.


“This county attorney is literally out of control. Open season on law enforcement must end. And it’s going to end with this case,” Madel said in a video statement.

Londregan has not been arrested. Moriarty said her office will not seek to hold him on bail but will ask the court to require him to surrender his passport and firearms. She expected his first court appearance to be scheduled for later this week or early next week.

Londregan shot Cobb after a July 31 traffic stop on Interstate 94 in Minneapolis. Two other troopers, including Brett Seide, initially pulled Cobb over when he saw the lights were out on the Ford Fusion that Cobb was driving, according to the criminal complaint.

Seide checked Cobb’s record and found he was wanted for violating an order for protection in neighboring Ramsey County. There was no outstanding arrest warrant, however, so the two troopers checked with Ramsey County officials to find out if they wanted Cobb taken into custody, the complaint said.


Ramsey County asked that he be arrested, and in the meantime, Londregan arrived to help.

Seide approached the driver’s side of Cobb’s car while Londregan went to the passenger door, according to the complaint.

The troopers asked Cobb to get out of the car, whose doors were locked and front windows down. Seide told him he was under arrest while Londregan reached inside, unlocked the doors and began opening the passenger door. The complaint said Cobb then shifted the car into drive and took his foot off the brake.

According to the complaint, Cobb’s car began to slowly move forward. Londregan reached for his gun. Cobb stopped the car. The trooper pointed his gun at Cobb and yelled, “Get out of the car now!” Cobb took his foot off the brake again. Within less than a second, Cobb fired his handgun twice at Cobb, striking him both times in the chest, the complaint said.


The car accelerated forward while Seide’s torso was still inside. Seide and Londregan tried to keep up with the car for several feet before falling to the ground. The car eventually collided with a concrete median about a quarter mile (0.4 kilometer) away.

The troopers caught up, pulled Cobb out and attempted lifesaving measures. Cobb was pronounced dead at the scene.

The defense filing quotes Seide and a third trooper, Garrett Erickson, as telling investigators that they believed Seide’s life was in danger.

The Minnesota State Patrol’s lead use-of-force trainer later told investigators that a reasonable officer would not believe that pointing a gun at a fleeing driver and yelling at him to stop would result in him stopping.


According to the complaint, State Patrol policy states that troopers shall not fire at a moving vehicle except when deadly force is authorized, and that troopers should not put themselves in a position that increases the risk that a vehicle that they’re approaching can be used as a deadly weapon.

The chief of the State Patrol, Col. Matt Langer, said in a statement that Londergan will remain on paid leave during an ongoing internal affairs investigation.

“This is a sad situation for everyone involved,” Langer said. “We acknowledge the deep loss felt by Mr. Cobb’s family and friends. We also recognize the gravity of this situation for the State Patrol and our troopers tasked with making difficult split-second decisions.”

Octavia Ruffin, Cobb’s sister, told The Associated Press that the family would not comment Wednesday and plans to hold a news conference on Thursday. Cobb’s family and racial justice groups demanded in August that Democratic Gov. Tim Walz fire the troopers who were involved.
 

spaminator

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Central Park 5 exoneree and council member says police stopped him without giving a reason
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Jan 28, 2024 • 1 minute read
Salaam, a member of the exonerated group of men known as the Central Park Five, says he was stopped and pulled over by police without being given an explanation. The police stop in New York City on Friday, Jan. 26, 2024 casts a renewed light on the How Many Stops Act, a police transparency bill that sparked a fight between City Council members and Mayor Eric Adams after the mayor, a former police captain, vetoed the legislation.
Salaam, a member of the exonerated group of men known as the Central Park Five, says he was stopped and pulled over by police without being given an explanation. The police stop in New York City on Friday, Jan. 26, 2024 casts a renewed light on the How Many Stops Act, a police transparency bill that sparked a fight between City Council members and Mayor Eric Adams after the mayor, a former police captain, vetoed the legislation.
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City Council Member Yusef Salaam, a member of the exonerated group of men known as the Central Park Five, says he was stopped and pulled over by police without being given an explanation.


The police stop in New York City on Friday casts a renewed light on the How Many Stops Act, a police transparency bill that sparked a fight between City Council members and Mayor Eric Adams after the mayor, a former police captain, vetoed the legislation. It would have required officers to publicly report on all investigative stops, including relatively low-level encounters with civilians.


In the encounter with Salaam, which lasted less than a minute at 6:20 p.m., a police officer — heard in body camera footage provided by the New York Police Department — asks Salaam to roll down the back windows of his car.

But after Salaam identifies himself as a council member, the officer quickly withdraws without providing further explanation for the stop.


Police later said in a statement that Salaam was stopped for driving with a dark tint beyond legal limits.

The police officer conducted himself professionally and respectfully, the NYPD said in the statement, adding that he used discretion to allow the council member to complete his official duties.

“This experience only amplified the importance of transparency for all police investigative stops, because the lack of transparency allows racial profiling and unconstitutional stops of all types to occur and often go underreported,” Salaam, a Democrat, said in a statement.

Salaam and four other Black or Latino men were falsely accused and convicted of raping and beating a white jogger in Central Park in 1989. Salaam was arrested at age 15 and imprisoned for almost seven years. Their convictions were eventually overturned through DNA evidence.

Salaam won a seat on the New York City Council in November and represents a central Harlem district.
 

spaminator

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Friends imprisoned for decades cleared of 1987 New Year’s killing in Times Square
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Jake Offenhartz
Published Feb 01, 2024 • 2 minute read

NEW YORK — In the early hours of New Year’s Day in 1987, a French tourist was mugged while walking with his wife through Times Square. The man, 71-year-old Jean Casse, struck his head on the pavement. He was pronounced dead soon after.


Within days, police hauled in a pair of young Brooklyn residents, 19-year-old Eric Smokes and 16-year-old David Warren, charging them with killing Casse. While both maintained their innocence, they were convicted at trial of murder and sent to prison for decades.


Nearly 40 years later, a New York City judge and a Manhattan prosecutor have sided with the men, now in their 50s. On Wednesday, years after a judge first denied their motions, their convictions were overturned after prosecutors said they uncovered evidence that police pressured witnesses.

“Eric Smokes and David Warren lost decades of their life to an unjust conviction,” Alvin Bragg, the Manhattan district attorney, said in a statement. “I am inspired by the unyielding advocacy of Mr. Smokes and Mr. Warren and hope that today’s decision can finally bring them a measure of comfort and justice.”


Smokes was released from prison on parole in 2011 after serving 24 years. Warren served 20 years before his release on parole in 2007.

The two men, who grew up together and described themselves as brothers, spent years trying to clear their name. No DNA evidence linked them to the crime. The four witnesses who testified at the trial were all teenagers — some of whom later said they were pressured by police and even threatened with arrest if they did not pin the killing on Smokes and Warren.

But when the two men brought a motion to vacate the convictions in 2017, the effort was opposed by Judge Stephen Antignani and the Manhattan district attorney’s office, then led by Cyrus Vance.

Christie Keenan, an assistant district attorney, questioned the credibility of the recanted witness statements. In a 2020 ruling, Antignani denied their motion, finding the men had “failed to demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that it is highly probable that they are innocent.”


Another investigation was opened in 2022 under Bragg — one that prosecutors said uncovered “significant new evidence,” including transcripts showing the teenage witnesses were pressured by police and that at least one of them was likely not in the vicinity of the crime.

With the new evidence in place, Antignani agreed to vacate the convictions this week.

Jay Henning, an attorney for the two men, said his clients were thrilled to see their names cleared. But, he added, the finding was long overdue.

“This was a case of tunnel vision riddled with police and prosecutorial misconduct,” Henning said. “This should’ve been done a while ago.”
 

spaminator

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Black Canadians report high levels of racism despite workplace improvements
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Ian Bickis
Published Feb 05, 2024 • 3 minute read

Canadian companies are making uneven progress on efforts to make workplaces more inclusive and equitable for Black workers, according to a survey from KPMG in Canada.


In the results of the survey released Monday, a little over 80 per cent of respondents said employers are making improvements — but a similar proportion said they’ve experienced some form of racism or microaggression in the workplace in the past year.


“While there is the overarching perception that progress has been made, still the majority, 81 per cent of people, are feeling racism, and that’s a very scary reality,” said Amanda Bartley, senior manager of management consulting at KPMG in Canada.

The share of Black people experiencing some form of discrimination was up about 10 percentage points from last year’s results, which suggests companies are not pushing below the surface enough to get to the heart of the issues, said Bartley, who is co-chair of the firm’s Black Professionals Network.


To get at the deeper issues, it’s important companies listen to Black employees, she said.

“Having safe spaces where people can share what they’re experiencing, without the potential risk of backlash and repercussions, is a great thing.”

The results of the survey of 1,000 employed Canadians who self-identified as Black also showed that women continue receive less support than men.

Only 68 per cent said their employer had an allyship training program, compared with 81 per cent of men. Women also reported lower levels of being able to bring their genuine self to work, or having allies at work who have spoken up for them.

“It’s important to recognize that Black women continue to be one of the most marginalized groups in workplaces, in society,” said Bartley.


She said companies need to work on creating environments where Black people can stay truer to their values, and don’t feel they need to conform to prescribed mainstream standards of appearance or behaviour just to protect themselves.

“It’s really pushing past the respectability politics, which is a conversation that continues to come up. It’s obviously come up more and more with the state of the world.”

The gender disparities among Black workers was also something Rob Davis, KPMG’s chief inclusion, diversity and equity officer, raised as a key concern.

“There is a very different experience in terms of Black men versus Black women, so that’s an area as Canadian businesses we need to continue to focus on.”

However there are areas for optimism, said Davis, including the 76 per cent of respondents who said that compared with four years ago, their company now has a Black person in the C-suite or on their board of directors.


“That to me is huge, because until Canadian business sees that representation at the senior levels … it’s going to be tough to change.”

The third edition of the survey, conducted between mid-December and January, found there are also concerns that as the economy slows, some of the gains in inclusion could be lost.

About 80 per cent said they believe Black or racialized people were among the first to lose their jobs over the past year, and as many as 73 per cent said their career progress didn’t materialize because the company was preparing for a slowdown.

It’s important to look beyond a last-in first-out approach, said Davis, and for companies to look at everyone’s talent, and consider some of their best might have been recently hired.


To push toward more inclusion and equity, companies also need to look at the data and set targets, he said. KPMG has set representation targets for women and people of colour in the partnership level of the firm, and goals for positions below that level for Black and Indigenous people and those with disabilities.

The firm has also tied partner compensation to the targets.

“For companies to really move the dial, set targets — not quotas. Quotas are a dirty word for me — put in place concrete actions to meet those targets, and hold your senior leadership accountable,” said Davis.

With so much going on, businesses and leaders can get distracted, but it’s important to keep working on these goals, he said.

“We’ve got to make sure that everybody has the same opportunity to achieve success in Canadian business. As a Canadian society, I think it’s important for us to continue to focus on this, and it’s going to make us, make the economy, more vibrant and richer.”
 

spaminator

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N.Y.C. mayor blames administration's woes on race, compares himself to Jesus
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Feb 07, 2024 • 1 minute read

New York City Mayor Eric Adams blamed attacks against his administration on race and went as far as to compare himself to Jesus.


According to Fox News, Adams told a town hall in Brooklyn last week that he is being attacked in a similar way to the city’s first Black mayor, David Dinkins. Adams is facing an FBI investigation into his mayoral campaign and has struggled with the influx of illegal immigrants.


Adams suggested critics are targeting him because of the makeup of his administration, Fox News reported. Five of his deputy mayors — Sheena Wright, Anne Williams-Isom, Meera Joshi, Ana Almanzar and Maria Torres-Springer — are women and people of colour.



“We are moving the needle forward,” Adams said to an applauding crowd, Fox reported. “Is there more to do? You’re darn right there is, but this committed team is getting it done. … And then go down the line, look who’s here. This is representative of the city. That’s why people are hating on me. You’re trying to figure out, why the hating on me?”


Adams also compared himself to Jesus, based on text from the Book of Matthew in the Bible, in which Jesus overturns the tables of moneylenders and drives everyone out of the temple.

“This is a Matthew 21 and 12 moment. Jesus walked in the temple, he saw them doing wrong in the temple. He did what?” Adams asked. “I went to city hall to turn the table over.”

New York City’s population is 30.9% white, 28.7% Hispanic or Latino, 20.2% Black or African-American, 15.6% Asian and 0.2% Native American, according to the 2020 census.

Adams also mentioned the diversity of his administration during the event.

“First woman police commissioner of colour,” he said. “First Spanish-speaking police commissioner. First Spanish-speaking correction commissioner. Go through the line of what we’re doing in two years.”
 

Dixie Cup

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N.Y.C. mayor blames administration's woes on race, compares himself to Jesus
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Feb 07, 2024 • 1 minute read

New York City Mayor Eric Adams blamed attacks against his administration on race and went as far as to compare himself to Jesus.


According to Fox News, Adams told a town hall in Brooklyn last week that he is being attacked in a similar way to the city’s first Black mayor, David Dinkins. Adams is facing an FBI investigation into his mayoral campaign and has struggled with the influx of illegal immigrants.


Adams suggested critics are targeting him because of the makeup of his administration, Fox News reported. Five of his deputy mayors — Sheena Wright, Anne Williams-Isom, Meera Joshi, Ana Almanzar and Maria Torres-Springer — are women and people of colour.



“We are moving the needle forward,” Adams said to an applauding crowd, Fox reported. “Is there more to do? You’re darn right there is, but this committed team is getting it done. … And then go down the line, look who’s here. This is representative of the city. That’s why people are hating on me. You’re trying to figure out, why the hating on me?”


Adams also compared himself to Jesus, based on text from the Book of Matthew in the Bible, in which Jesus overturns the tables of moneylenders and drives everyone out of the temple.

“This is a Matthew 21 and 12 moment. Jesus walked in the temple, he saw them doing wrong in the temple. He did what?” Adams asked. “I went to city hall to turn the table over.”

New York City’s population is 30.9% white, 28.7% Hispanic or Latino, 20.2% Black or African-American, 15.6% Asian and 0.2% Native American, according to the 2020 census.

Adams also mentioned the diversity of his administration during the event.

“First woman police commissioner of colour,” he said. “First Spanish-speaking police commissioner. First Spanish-speaking correction commissioner. Go through the line of what we’re doing in two years.”
And look what all that "chocolate" has gotten NYC! Terrible place to live. Were these "merit" hires or "race based" hires? Inquiring minds want to know just how well the city's policies are working....
 

petros

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And look what all that "chocolate" has gotten NYC! Terrible place to live. Were these "merit" hires or "race based" hires? Inquiring minds want to know just how well the city's policies are working....
They arent working.

NYC is crashing. Commercial real estate is tanking fast. Its going to spread across N. America. The property taxes lost wont be made up by something else.

Its like what happened to Calgary but 1000X worse. Its all commercial not just one sector (O&G).
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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They arent working.

NYC is crashing. Commercial real estate is tanking fast. Its going to spread across N. America. The property taxes lost wont be made up by something else.

Its like what happened to Calgary but 1000X worse. Its all commercial not just one sector (O&G).
This year will be when the distress brewing in commercial real estate finally reaches its breaking point, according to Capital Economics.

The research firm pointed to pessimism that has clouded the commercial real estate sector for the past year. Commentators have been warning of a crash, thanks to tightening credit conditions as a wave of debt from property owners comes due.

Around $541 billion of commercial real estate debt officially matured in 2023, though fallout was muted as many loans were granted extensions, the firm said.

That's a sign many building owners are looking to "extend and pretend," but that strategy can't last forever as there's still a $2.2 trillion mountain of commercial real estate debt that will mature by 2027, according to Capital Economics deputy chief property economist Kiran Raichura.