Biden Addresses Racism Against Asians

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Germany is neo-liberal you halfwit, not leftist.
Communism is where workers keep their fruits of their labour, thats literally the entire ideology of communism you diaper-wearing knuckledragger. Stop typing, you wholly inadequate for this argument.
You are seriously demented if you actually believe that. OMG talk about not knowing your history or what communism it truly about.
 

spaminator

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Jay Leno apologizes to Asian Americans for decade of 'wrong' jokes
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 24, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 2 minute read • 14 Comments
Comedian Jay Leno speaks at the Carousel of Hope Ball in Beverly Hills, Calif., Oct. 8, 2016.
Comedian Jay Leno speaks at the Carousel of Hope Ball in Beverly Hills, Calif., Oct. 8, 2016. PHOTO BY DAVID MCNEW /REUTERS
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LOS ANGELES — Television host Jay Leno has apologized for more than a decade of jokes about Asian Americans, saying he had committed a “legitimate wrong.”

The apology by Leno, the former host of U.S. television’s popular “Tonight Show,” follows a long campaign by the Media Action Network for Asian Americans (MANAA) and a spike in hate crimes against the community that has received renewed attention since a shooting in Atlanta last week that left eight people dead, six of them Asian-American women.


MANAA said that between 2002 and 2012 Leno made at least nine documented jokes about Koreans or Chinese people eating dogs or cats. The group has been seeking an apology ever since 2002 and said on Wednesday that it received one in a February call with Leno.

“At the time I did those jokes, I genuinely thought them to be harmless,” Leno said in the call, according to a statement issued by MANAA that it said had been agreed with Leno. “I was making fun of our enemy North Korea, and like most jokes, there was a ring of truth to them.

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“At the time, there was a prevailing attitude that some group is always complaining about something, so don’t worry about it. Whenever we received a complaint, there would be two sides to the discussion: either ‘We need to deal with this’ or ‘Screw ’em if they can’t take a joke.’

“Too many times I sided with the latter even when in my heart I knew it was wrong. That is why I am issuing this apology. I do not consider this particular case to be another example of cancel culture but a legitimate wrong that was done on my part,” Leno added.

Leno, now 70, hosted “The Tonight Show” for more than 20 years until he bowed out in 2014. He is due to host a revival later this year of the 1950s radio and TV quiz show “You Bet Your Life.”

MANAA said Leno’s apology had resolved the group’s grievances with the comedian. Representatives for Leno did not return requests on Wednesday for further comment.
 

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Man accused of 'hate-motivated' violence against Asians in Markham
Anti-Asian hate crimes have reportedly surged since late 2019 when coronavirus surfaced in Wuhan, China

Author of the article:Chris Doucette
Publishing date:Mar 24, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • 27 Comments
Ethan Yang, 11, holds a sign reading "racism is the disease" during a "Kids vs. Racism" rally against anti-Asian hate crimes at Hing Hay Park in the Chinatown-International District of Seattle, Washington, U.S. on March 20, 2021.
Ethan Yang, 11, holds a sign reading "racism is the disease" during a "Kids vs. Racism" rally against anti-Asian hate crimes at Hing Hay Park in the Chinatown-International District of Seattle, Washington, U.S. on March 20, 2021. PHOTO BY LINDSEY WASSON /REUTERS
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A 33-year-old man faces charges for a string of “hate-motivated” incidents of violence in Markham that targeted Asians in recent months.

York Regional Police say they received a report of an assault in the area of Pillar Rock Cr. — a residential neighbourhood near Woodbine Ave. and Major Mackenzie Dr. E. — around 2 p.m. on March 16.


“The victim had been outside walking when a suspect ran up behind her and hit her in the back with an object,” Const. Laura Nicolle said Wednesday.

She said investigators subsequently located additional victims of five other incidents that they believe were committed by the same man since January.

“All of the victims are Asian and investigators believe that the incidents were hate-motivated,” Nicolle said.

Investigators identified a suspect and arrested him on Monday.

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Arjun Choudhari, 33, of Markham, is charged with one count of assault with a weapon, three counts of assault and two counts of criminal harassment.

Aware hate-motivated crimes often go unreported, police are reassuring the public that any such report is taken seriously and investigated.

And they encouraged members of the public to report any incident they believe may be “motivated by hate, racism or discrimination.”

“We do not tolerate hate crime in any form,” Nicolle said. “Those who victimize individuals based on race, national or ethnic origin, language, colour, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or mental or physical disability will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”


Anti-Asian hate crimes have reportedly surged since late 2019 when coronavirus surfaced in Wuhan and quickly spread beyond China ‘s borders to become a global pandemic.

The issue has made headlines over the last week after a white gunman opened fire on March 16 at several massage parlours in Atlanta killing eight people — six of whom were Asian.

Police in Atlanta were quick to point out the accused gunman Robert Aaron Long, 21, allegedly claimed he targeted the massage parlours because he blamed them for his sex addiction, not because of ill will toward Asians.

But the shooting spree sparked outrage, and demonstrations, around the world and has since raised awareness of a troubling issue.

cdoucette@postmedia.com

On Twitter: @SunDoucette
 

spaminator

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New York deploying Asian undercover force to combat hate crimes
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Barbara Goldberg
Publishing date:Mar 25, 2021 • 5 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Dermot Shea, police commissioner of the City of New York, speaks at a news conference at Police Headquarters in New York, March 25, 2021.
Dermot Shea, police commissioner of the City of New York, speaks at a news conference at Police Headquarters in New York, March 25, 2021. PHOTO BY CARLO ALLEGRI /REUTERS
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NEW YORK — New York City plans to deploy an all-Asian undercover police team and expand community outreach in more than 200 languages to combat a rise in hate crimes against Asians, authorities said on Thursday.

“If you are going to commit a hate crime in New York City, we will find you,” New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said in unveiling the two-pronged plan to fight bias crimes.


“We are not going to tolerate anyone being targeted because of the color of their skin, the religion they worship, their sexual preference or anything else,” Shea said.

Just days after a spate of assaults on Asian-Americans in New York City last weekend, Shea said he was ramping up the NYPD’s undercover force with plain-clothed officers, all of them of Asian descent. Starting this weekend, they will patrol subways, grocery stores and other locations to stem anti-Asian incidents that total 26 so far this year, including 12 assaults, police said.

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“The next person you target through speech or menacing activity may be a plain-clothed New York police officer – so think twice,” Shea said.


The 26 incidents so far have resulted in seven arrests, police said. Those incidents included 12 assaults so far this year, three of them last weekend, police said. By comparison, at this time last year, there were no assaults reported against Asian-Americans, police said.

Because hate crimes too often go unreported, now anyone dialing 911 can utter a single English word for their native language – such as Mandarin – and police operators will help access translators who speak more than 200 languages, police said.

Advocates tied the surge in hate crimes to blame that has been placed on the Asian-American Pacific Islander community for the coronavirus spread. The community reported a spike in violence since March 2020, when then-President Donald Trump started repeatedly referring to COVID-19 as the “China virus” and “kung flu,” which some said inflamed anti-Asian sentiment.

Hate crimes against Asian Americans rose by 149% in 2020 in 16 major cities compared with 2019, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. Violent incidents included people being slashed with a box cutter, lit on fire and verbal harassment, according to testimony at a U.S. congressional hearing on anti-Asian violence convened this month.

The most deadly incident was this month’s shooting spree at three Atlanta area spas that left eight people dead, six of them Asian women. A 21-year-old white man has been charged with multiple counts of murder, and police investigating motives have not ruled out the possibility that the attacks were provoked, at least in part, by anti-immigrant or anti-Asian sentiments.