Alberta is on the verge of another boom — will it be more sustainable this time around?

Mowich

Hall of Fame Member
Dec 25, 2005
16,539
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Eagle Creek

O Canada, Remember Me?​

We Canadians are always learning to respond to our own failings, and to the misguided policies and injustices perpetrated by previous generations and governments, and the many institutions that remain unchanged today. Sometimes, clearing the fog of bias, hate and injustice has been a slow process. Nonetheless, the lens is being cleaned, and everyone today has access to that flawed vision of our past. This makes Canada different, a stronger and more just nation—not perfect, but a work in progress.

Unfortunately, accommodation has become altogether too common. We now have separate Remembrance Day celebrations for Indigenous soldiers who fought in the Canadian army, another for Sikh soldiers and a third for the rest. How about another for Black soldiers, another for Chinese soldiers and another for women? How about Italian Canadians who fought against their own relatives, and one for Jewish soldiers?

The raising and lowering of the Canadian flag to half-mast has become so confusing and meaningless that most people no longer understand or care about it. At the War Memorial, every other nation’s flags are proportionately also lowered and raised with increasing frequency. By creating symbolic accommodations to disparate interests, the very symbolism of those practices and traditions is being irreparably eroded.

Symbols are important, and everyone deserves to honour the traditions and symbols that mark their identities, accomplishments and aspirations. However, building up others’ traditions while tearing mine down is neither fair, nor just or tolerable. Either we are all Canadians or we are all free to tear off our own piece of the flag and replace it with a version of our own identity.

There should be one Remembrance Day for all. We must honour those who fought and sacrificed for the futures they gave us. They were brothers and sisters regardless of creed, religion or colour. And whether our ancestors were alive then or not, whether we were in Canada then or not, we must remember the benefits we derive from our predecessors’ experiences.

Everyone who enjoys the protections and freedoms afforded by this nation is obliged to remedy the past and to contribute to a grander tomorrow. That will not happen as long as we keep separating ourselves into more and more silos and self-interest groups.

Remembrance Day can become better. It can be more inclusive of the prayers, the veterans and the words that commemorate the day, but we must do it together, as one. Remembrance Day should mean that we all stand strong and march together—to show our unequalled ability to be united despite everything, and to demonstrate what is still possible for Canada.

 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,822
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Not if turdOWE has anything to say about it.
Clarity is a great virtue, and this sentence was really clear: “Obviously, the way some things are being handled today — where certain parts of the country are singled out in ways that others aren’t — I think is really inexcusable.”
That “inexcusable” is, in context, a very hard word. But it is the needful word, as it is perfectly accurate. Any policy which, in effect, sets up great resentment in one region of the country, puts inequitable pressure on one or two provinces and carries hardly any negative impact comparatively on the others, is dangerous. Very particularly a global warming policy, which will have at best a trivial effect on the problem it presupposes to address — as long as China, India, Russia continue their industrial ambitions — and yet ignites extreme (and justified) resentment in a whole region of the country, that policy is both “inexcusable” and dangerous.

The whole article is at the above LINK & well worth the read….

Mr. Harper’s words however did receive considerable reinforcement from another Conservative leader who is quite clearly not intimidated: Scott Moe. On this net zero issue Saskatchewan doesn’t “headline” as often as Alberta, but the impact on that province is very great. Premier Moe sees the concerns of Saskatchewan brushed aside. The federal government is not listening. So, as Premier, he has a return strategy: “We’re really starting to feel the differences between Saskatchewan and where our federal government is heading, is we’re actually, at this point in time … more like a nation within Canada.”
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
22,153
3,260
113
B.C.


O Canada, Remember Me?​

We Canadians are always learning to respond to our own failings, and to the misguided policies and injustices perpetrated by previous generations and governments, and the many institutions that remain unchanged today. Sometimes, clearing the fog of bias, hate and injustice has been a slow process. Nonetheless, the lens is being cleaned, and everyone today has access to that flawed vision of our past. This makes Canada different, a stronger and more just nation—not perfect, but a work in progress.

Unfortunately, accommodation has become altogether too common. We now have separate Remembrance Day celebrations for Indigenous soldiers who fought in the Canadian army, another for Sikh soldiers and a third for the rest. How about another for Black soldiers, another for Chinese soldiers and another for women? How about Italian Canadians who fought against their own relatives, and one for Jewish soldiers?

The raising and lowering of the Canadian flag to half-mast has become so confusing and meaningless that most people no longer understand or care about it. At the War Memorial, every other nation’s flags are proportionately also lowered and raised with increasing frequency. By creating symbolic accommodations to disparate interests, the very symbolism of those practices and traditions is being irreparably eroded.

Symbols are important, and everyone deserves to honour the traditions and symbols that mark their identities, accomplishments and aspirations. However, building up others’ traditions while tearing mine down is neither fair, nor just or tolerable. Either we are all Canadians or we are all free to tear off our own piece of the flag and replace it with a version of our own identity.

There should be one Remembrance Day for all. We must honour those who fought and sacrificed for the futures they gave us. They were brothers and sisters regardless of creed, religion or colour. And whether our ancestors were alive then or not, whether we were in Canada then or not, we must remember the benefits we derive from our predecessors’ experiences.

Everyone who enjoys the protections and freedoms afforded by this nation is obliged to remedy the past and to contribute to a grander tomorrow. That will not happen as long as we keep separating ourselves into more and more silos and self-interest groups.

Remembrance Day can become better. It can be more inclusive of the prayers, the veterans and the words that commemorate the day, but we must do it together, as one. Remembrance Day should mean that we all stand strong and march together—to show our unequalled ability to be united despite everything, and to demonstrate what is still possible for Canada.

And that is what brought our country together in the following years allowing us boomers to reject the biases df our parents and make Canada the welcoming country it is . Unfortunately to many forget or never knew the history and make up of the country . Prime example is grouping all white peoples as one .
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,605
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Vancouver Island
It seems that those of us whose families were late coming to Canada(mine have only been here a little over 100 years) are getting hung for perceived crimes that happened long before we got here.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
22,153
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B.C.
It seems that those of us whose families were late coming to Canada(mine have only been here a little over 100 years) are getting hung for perceived crimes that happened long before we got here.
How about those that came after WW2 ?
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
3,718
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Edmonton
With idiot Mayors like the one recently elected in Calgary, I don't know that Alberta will be on the up rise. It's people like her that want to destroy things, not build them up. It's all well & good to have "clean energy" but what they fail to realize that clean energy alone WILL NOT support today's energy needs so she's simply making things worse.

Calgary - what were you thinking voting this person in? The same for Edmonton - voting for the same type of person - what were you thinking? Both cities will be hurt long-term by these ideological idiots. & we'll never get out from under. Their policies will simply break us with rising taxes so that they can implement their radical ideas. I'm disgusted.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
22,153
3,260
113
B.C.
With idiot Mayors like the one recently elected in Calgary, I don't know that Alberta will be on the up rise. It's people like her that want to destroy things, not build them up. It's all well & good to have "clean energy" but what they fail to realize that clean energy alone WILL NOT support today's energy needs so she's simply making things worse.

Calgary - what were you thinking voting this person in? The same for Edmonton - voting for the same type of person - what were you thinking? Both cities will be hurt long-term by these ideological idiots. & we'll never get out from under. Their policies will simply break us with rising taxes so that they can implement their radical ideas. I'm disgusted.
Come now look at all the new bike lanes .