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spaminator

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Trans swimmer Lia Thomas nominated for NCAA Woman of the Year award
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Jul 16, 2022 • 2 days ago • 1 minute read • 8 Comments

The University of Pennsylvania has nominated transgender swimmer Lia Thomas for the 2022 NCAA Woman of the Year award, the American college sports regulating body said.


Thomas shot to fame earlier this year when she became the first transgender NCAA champion in Division I history after winning the women’s 500-yard freestyle in March and she had hoped to compete for a place at the Olympics.

But soon after, she became the focus of a raging debate when swimming’s world governing body FINA voted last month to restrict the participation of transgender athletes in elite women’s competitions.


Thomas competed on Pennsylvania’s men’s team for three years before transitioning and moving to the women’s team, setting multiple programme records.

Her eligibility had come under considerable scrutiny, including from several Pennsylvania team mates.



The NCAA said member schools nominated a total of 577 graduating student-athletes. Each school can recognize up to two female athletes and Thomas had been nominated for swimming and diving in Division I.

The Woman of the Year selection committee will select 10 student-athletes from each of the three NCAA divisions. Of the top 30, the committee will then announce nine finalists — three from each division.

The winner will be named at the NCAA Convention in January in San Antonio.
 
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spaminator

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Ex-Kentucky swimmer blasts Lia Thomas’ NCAA award nomination
"The NCAA has made this award worthless," Riley Gaines tweeted.

Author of the article:Eddie Chau
Publishing date:Jul 18, 2022 • 17 hours ago • 2 minute read • 22 Comments

Former University of Kentucky swimmer Riley Gaines has called the NCAA’s Woman of the Year award “worthless” after transgender swimmer Lia Thomas was named a nominee for the prize.

Responding to a tweet by sports journalist Clay Travis, Gaines slammed the nomination, stating it is “another slap in the face of women,” adding fuel to the ongoing debate about whether transgender women should be allowed to compete in sports against biological women.

“Being the real girl in that photo and also University of Kentucky’s nominee for NCAA WOTY, this is yet another slap in the face to women. First a female national title and now nominated for the pinnacle award in collegiate athletics. The @NCAA has made this award worthless,” Gaines tweeted.



In a second tweet, Gaines said the Women of the Year award — which is NCAA’s top honour — “combines athletic performance with academics, service and character.”

“What character has Thomas shown other than sheer selfishness and entitlement? The disrespect and disregard for the other female athletes in Thomas’ interviews is eye opening,” she tweeted.

Fox News reported Gaines was also nominated for the same award. The University of Kentucky swimmer retired from competitive swimming after winning three conference titles and breaking two records in the Southeastern Conference, among other distinctions.

At this year’s NCAA championships in swimming, Gaines placed second behind Thomas, who won the 200-yard freestyle event.


Each school nominates one athlete for the Woman of the Year honour. The University of Pennsylvania nominated Thomas.



The NCAA identifies the top 30 nominees. The group is then whittled down to nine finalists, in which a winner is selected for the award.

Thomas’ nomination comes in light of FINA — the governmental body behind swimming internationally — approving new policies for transgender swimmers, including the “gender inclusion policy” which only allows swimmers who transitioned before the age of 12 to participate in women’s competitions.
 
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Serryah

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Ex-Kentucky swimmer blasts Lia Thomas’ NCAA award nomination
"The NCAA has made this award worthless," Riley Gaines tweeted.

Author of the article:Eddie Chau
Publishing date:Jul 18, 2022 • 17 hours ago • 2 minute read • 22 Comments

Former University of Kentucky swimmer Riley Gaines has called the NCAA’s Woman of the Year award “worthless” after transgender swimmer Lia Thomas was named a nominee for the prize.

Responding to a tweet by sports journalist Clay Travis, Gaines slammed the nomination, stating it is “another slap in the face of women,” adding fuel to the ongoing debate about whether transgender women should be allowed to compete in sports against biological women.

“Being the real girl in that photo and also University of Kentucky’s nominee for NCAA WOTY, this is yet another slap in the face to women. First a female national title and now nominated for the pinnacle award in collegiate athletics. The @NCAA has made this award worthless,” Gaines tweeted.



In a second tweet, Gaines said the Women of the Year award — which is NCAA’s top honour — “combines athletic performance with academics, service and character.”

“What character has Thomas shown other than sheer selfishness and entitlement? The disrespect and disregard for the other female athletes in Thomas’ interviews is eye opening,” she tweeted.

Fox News reported Gaines was also nominated for the same award. The University of Kentucky swimmer retired from competitive swimming after winning three conference titles and breaking two records in the Southeastern Conference, among other distinctions.

At this year’s NCAA championships in swimming, Gaines placed second behind Thomas, who won the 200-yard freestyle event.


Each school nominates one athlete for the Woman of the Year honour. The University of Pennsylvania nominated Thomas.



The NCAA identifies the top 30 nominees. The group is then whittled down to nine finalists, in which a winner is selected for the award.

Thomas’ nomination comes in light of FINA — the governmental body behind swimming internationally — approving new policies for transgender swimmers, including the “gender inclusion policy” which only allows swimmers who transitioned before the age of 12 to participate in women’s competitions.


WAAAAA

She's just been nominated, it doesn't mean she'll get anything. FFS, stop whining.

TBH if she deserves it, fine, if she doesn't, that's fine too.
 
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Twin_Moose

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It was turned into it by the nut bars who are anti-gay, so yeah, makes sense.

Kind'a like how Nazi doesn't mean what it should, and fascist. Or Communist.
Are you saying the Lesbian that fought for their rights from the start and now wants no part of the groomers is wrong? What does the L and G stand for in the Alphabet community again?
 
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Serryah

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Dec 3, 2008
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...

It's not like we didn't know after Roe v Wade.

Apparently freedom and equality is only a thing that matters to the typical straight, white men of the country who have all the power.

I honestly hope that they go after mixed marriages after this. Clarence Thomas and his wife, Turtle and his wife; none of them will be allowed to be married anymore. And shouldn't be! After all, it's not in the constitution!
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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...

It's not like we didn't know after Roe v Wade.

Apparently freedom and equality is only a thing that matters to the typical straight, white men of the country who have all the power.

I honestly hope that they go after mixed marriages after this. Clarence Thomas and his wife, Turtle and his wife; none of them will be allowed to be married anymore. And shouldn't be! After all, it's not in the constitution!
Yep. If you go back in time, Obergefell v. Hodges is the first one you hit. After that, you got Lawrence v. Texas (anti-sodomy laws), Eisenstadt v. Baird (contraception), Loving v. Virginia (interracial marriage), Griswold v. Connecticut (contraception for married couples), and eventually work your way back to Brown v. Topeka Board of Education (segregation).

By the way, if they strike Loving v. Virginia, Injustice Thomas's marriage automatically becomes illegal. The prohibition on interracial marriage is in Virginia's constitution. It was just overridden by Loving, but never removed or amended. Loving gets reversed, Injustice Thomas is automatically a criminal.
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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That's just stupid and wrong. Even if you reverse the decision (I am not in favour of reversing btw) you should honour existing unions.
Can't, in Virginia. As I said, Virginia forbids "miscegenation" in its constitution. That provision has never been removed, just rendered ineffective by Loving v. Virginia. If Loving is overturned, that constitutional provision is instantly restored. The Lovings, both residents of Virginia, were married in the District of Columbia. They then returned to Virginia, where they were criminally prosecuted, pled guilty, and were each sentenced to one year in prison. I'm not sure if that statute ever came off the books, or if it would also come back into effect the moment Loving is overturned, but the Virginia constitutional provision will, by operation of law.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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CORRECTION: My error. Virginia's constitution contains a provision against same-sex marriage. The prohibition on interracial marriage was only statutory.

It appears the law has been repealed (it no longer exists in the Code of Virginia. So the Thomases remain married and won't go to jail if they overturn Loving.

I imagine that'll make it easier for Injustice Thomas to vote to overturn.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Former PQ leader André Boisclair sentenced to two years for sex assault
Boisclair, 56, pleaded guilty last month to sexually assaulting two men in 2014 and 2015.

Author of the article:Jesse Feith • Montreal Gazette
Publishing date:Jul 18, 2022 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation

After pleading guilty to sexually assaulting two men, former Parti Québécois leader André Boisclair was sentenced to a prison term of two years less a day on Monday.


Scientists discover how caffeine protects against cardiovascular disease


Standing before a judge at the Montreal courthouse, Boisclair, 56, recorded little reaction as he learned his fate. Quickly handcuffed, he was taken into custody as an acquaintance rushed to hand him a grocery bag of his belongings.

“The acts committed by (Boisclair) are highly reprehensible,” Quebec Court Judge Pierre Labelle said while delivering the sentence, recognizing the courage the complainants showed in coming forward.

Once considered the future of the Parti Québécois, Boisclair was charged in the first case in 2020, and then again in January of last year. The charges stem from assaults he committed in 2014 and 2015.

In his decision on Monday, Labelle focused on the “devastating consequences” the assaults continue to have on the victims, who were both in their 20s at the time.


In the first case, after exchanging messages on social media, the victim agreed to meet Boisclair at his home while others were there. The man had consented to certain sexual acts, but had been clear he was not interested in having anal sex.

At one point in the night, however, Boisclair — who the man described as becoming “completely crazy” after using drugs — ordered two others to hold the victim down and penetrate him.

In the second case, the victim told police Boisclair tried to initiate sex with him at his residence, and that he had to tell him to stop at least three times before the former politician finally backed down.

The victims’ identities are covered under a publication ban. Both were present in court on Monday as Labelle gave a summary of how the assaults altered their lives.


The first victim, Labelle said, has lived through periods of depression ever since and has been forced to abandon his studies as a result.

“Since the events in 2014, his life has taken a turn for the worse, which he has not been able to break free from,” Labelle said. “While he was once involved in politics, he now lives with an aversion to politicians.”

Labelle said the second victim, meanwhile, has continued to be paralyzed by feelings of pain and anger.

“He had done his coming out only a few months earlier,” Labelle added, “and was just beginning to flourish.”

In deciding Boisclair’s sentence, Labelle weighed both aggravating and mitigating factors.

Aggravating factors included that there were two assaults, the consequences they’ve had on the victims and that Boisclair likely used his status to meet the victims.


The latter included that Boisclair had no previous record, wrote apologies to the victims, and has undertaken therapy since his arrest. That Boisclair pleaded guilty, Labelle noted, also allowed the victims to avoid a long and difficult trial.

The sentence of two years less a day matches the joint recommendation made by the defence and Crown prosecutors in the case. It also includes two years of probation.

Speaking to reporters after the hearing, Crown prosecutor Jérôme Laflamme said he believes the sentence is fair and sends the right message about sexual assaults.

“It sends a message that offences like these are serious and are harshly punished,” Laflamme said, adding that he hopes it will allow the victims to begin feeling some relief.


“They underwent darker times and we can only hope that, from now on, life will be sweeter for them,” the prosecutor said.

Under the Parti Québécois, Boisclair, then 23, had become the youngest member ever elected to the National Assembly by winning a seat in the 1989 election. He went on to hold several minister positions until taking over as leader of the party in 2005.

Arriving at the courthouse on Monday, Boisclair rushed past reporters and declined to comment on the case. His defence lawyer also declined to speak with reporters after the hearing.

jfeith@postmedia.com