Occupy Wall Street Fail


mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
+1
#1201
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Are you hanging out with Dark Beaver?????

Trying out the new crop???

oh yea..

PROVE ME WRONG
 
Colpy
Conservative
+2
#1202
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

oh yea..

PROVE ME WRONG

Hey!!

I didn't say you were wrong....

I suspect you were fduked up....

There's a difference....
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1203
Okay, I'll let this one go, Colpers..


People have ‘had enough’ of Occupy Toronto, protesters should move on: Rob Ford

Mayor Rob Ford says it’s time for the protesters who have occupied St. James Park to move on.

Mr. Ford did not elaborate on how that would happen, but said he plans to speak to the police chief about the matter.

Supporters of the international “Occupy” movement have been camping out in the downtown park for several weeks to raise awareness about various issues, among them income inequality.

“We’ve had a peaceful protest, but I think it’s time we asked them to move on,” Mayor Ford said Wednesday following a tour of the construction site of the Eglinton-Scarborough Crosstown light rail line, at Keelesdale Park, with Premier Dalton McGuinty. “I’m here to represent the businesses and taxpayers in the city and I’m getting numerous calls. People have told me they’ve had enough. I think it’s the right thing to do,” said Mr. Ford.

Premier Dalton McGuinty refused to wade into the issue, saying he would leave it up to the city to decide on what to do. “The only request I would make to the protesters is while they exercise their right to give expression to their concerns, they do so in a way that is respectful others rights and respects the law,” said Mr. McGuinty.

Sid Ryan, president of the Ontario Federation of Labour, has offered to pay to bring all the occupy protesters from across the province to Toronto on Nov. 24 to meet and lease with their counterparts around Ontario.

On that day, members of the Ontario Federation of Labour will be marching on Bay Street to protest against many of the policies the Occupy movement has been decrying.

“The issues that they’re fighting for are exactly the same issues that labour has been fighting for many many years: Corporate greed, corporate taxes, the loss of public-sector jobs, high university fees,” said Ryan. “It makes perfect sense that the two organizations would be able to work hand-in-hand.”

The future of the protests across Canada is uncertain.

Vancouver police Chief Jim Chu said Tuesday it is time for the protesters to leave their encampment outside the Vancouver Art Gallery peacefully, warning that it has been “infiltrated by a violent element.” The protesters argued they have a constitutional right to protest and have been steadfast in saying they will not leave their camp.

In Victoria, meanwhile, bylaw officials served Occupy Victoria protesters in Centennial Square on Tuesday with copies of the city’s petition for a court order to clear the area. The city applied late Monday to B.C. Supreme Court for an order to remove tents and structures. A hearing has been scheduled for Nov. 15.

Occupy Toronto protesters should move on: Rob Ford | Posted Toronto | National Post


Who are these bitchers calling the Rob f'ing Ford customer service line?
 
TenPenny
+1
#1204
Quote: Originally Posted by ColpyView Post

Are you hanging out with Dark Beaver?????

Trying out the new crop???


Occupy ******, hanging out with a Dark Beaver.

Yes, that's what I'd like to be doing right now.
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1205
Fresh Regina..

Occupy Regina protesters staying put
24 tents still in Victoria Park Wednesday morning


Occupy Regina protesters say they are not going anywhere, despite being asked to leave by the city.
Members of the group appeared at a city council meeting Tuesday night, objecting to a possible eviction from Victoria Park.

The city has removed the group's portable toilet, citing public health concerns.

The Occupy group rallied at City Hall Wednesday, where they asked the city to apologize for removing a portable toilet.

Several dozen protesters have been camping in the northeast corner of the downtown park since Oct. 15.

"The camp here is definitely planning to stick it out," said Shannon Corkery, who has been staying at the Occupy Regina site since Oct 17. "We want the city to allow us to exercise our constitutional rights for freedom of speech."

The group is part of an international protest movement aimed at raising concerns about economic injustice and the growing gap between rich and poor.

Earlier this week, Regina bylaw officials visited the camp where some 24 tents remain, and asked people to leave.

Occupy Regina protesters staying put - Saskatchewan - CBC News
 
Locutus
#1206
Another quality example of the brainfarters and mouthbreathers that occupy these sideshows. Not quite Loitonesque but he's trying.



Occupy Attacks Occupy Portland Attacks KGW News Crew - YouTube

 
TenPenny
+1
#1207
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

"The camp here is definitely planning to stick it out," said Shannon Corkery, who has been staying at the Occupy Regina site since Oct 17. "We want the city to allow us to exercise our constitutional rights for freedom of speech."

Right to freedom of speech does not mean camping in a park and the supply of a portable toilet.
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1208
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Another quality example of the brainfarters and mouthbreathers that occupy these sideshows. Not quite Loitonesque but he's trying.



Occupy Attacks Occupy Portland Attacks KGW News Crew - YouTube


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individual
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groups
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People

When you're finished with those, I suggest:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statistics

and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Math
Last edited by mentalfloss; Nov 9th, 2011 at 02:33 PM..
 
Locutus
#1209

Guy trying to film the scene at Occupy Vancouver gets verbally accosted then assaulted - YouTube

 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1210
It's easy (and disingenuous) to just post the s hitty parts.
 
coldstream
+2
#1211
I think everyone knew this movement.. would start to attract discards and damaged people.

I think it has galvanized attention on the issues of polarization of wealth, political corruption and corporate greed. At this point more direct action, like what you saw in the States of people closing their Bank of America accounts to open ones at Credit Unions, would be more constructive. Ultimately an agenda is going to have to reach the ballot box.. and to do that it will have to be precisely articulated.

In Vancouver, you see denizens of East Hastings moving to Art Gallery Square for a party/drug binge and free food.. with at least 2 overdoses, one causing death. It's just starting of to lose its audience, and worse alienate them.

The fact is though, that the current economic malaise, is not a static state event. The world's economy is collapsing, and there is no way that is going to happen without causing intense conflict, between and within nations.
Last edited by coldstream; Nov 9th, 2011 at 02:47 PM..
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#1212
The sad part about these protestors is the only people they are impressing is other morons!
 
Locutus
#1213
Molotov cocktail set off at World Trade Center building in downtown Portland, police suspect Occupy Portland protesters involved



Molotov cocktail set off at World Trade Center building in downtown Portland, police suspect Occupy Portland protesters involved | OregonLive.com






Molotov cocktail suspect returned to Occupy Portland camp, Mayor Sam Adams says



Molotov cocktail suspect returned to Occupy Portland camp, Mayor Sam Adams says | OregonLive.com





And the NYT finally takes note:


The New York Times is belatedly starting to commit actual journalism on what’s actually happening at the Occupy Wall Street camp-out in Zuccotti Park. Cara Buckley and Matt Flegenheimer reported for Wednesday's Metro section: “At Scene of Wall St. Protest, Rising Concerns About Crime,” mostly abandons the chirpy promotionalism that has infected the paper’s coverage of OWS, catching up to what local rival the New York Post has been doing every day.




At Scene of Wall St. Protest, Rising Concerns About Crime



The arrest of a Crown Heights man last week on charges of sexually assaulting a protester at Zuccotti Park added to an already raucous public discussion of lawlessness at the site, where a revolving group of demonstrators has been camped for nearly eight weeks. Stories of crimes and dangerous behavior, mostly anecdotal, have been used as fuel by those who say the protesters must go.



But police statistics tell competing stories: the number of arrests and crimes has risen in the last month, but the number of summonses has fallen. Getting a handle on just how dangerous it has become for Occupy Wall Street protesters and those who live nearby has been made more difficult by an informal divide that has sprung up between who patrols inside the park and who patrols outside.





http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/09/ny...er=rss&emc=rss
 
CDNBear
#1214
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

It's easy (and disingenuous) to just post the s hitty parts.

Hey!!! Who knew you two had something in common.
 
Angstrom
Liberal
#1215
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Hey!!! Who knew you two had something in common.


****s getting nasty xDDD ouch!

I'm happy the way Canada has handled this situation up to date. Class act.
Our police and city staff should be praised.
 
CDNBear
+1
#1216
Quote: Originally Posted by AngstromView Post

****s getting nasty xDDD ouch!

I'm happy the way Canada has handled this situation up to date. Class act.
Our police and city staff should be praised.

I think most of the cities that have had this event materialize in their backyard, have done well.

Especially given the type of people that have been drawn to them.
 
Locutus
#1217
The latest in the banker-Hitler comparison.

The neckbeard known as Mario Batali.



Mario Batali’s political views are, um, a little interesting. The ever-so-recognizable celebrity chef, who hangs out with the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow when he’s not starring in his Food Network shows or running one of his many restaurants, thinks bankers are as evil as Adolf Hitler and Josef Stalin were.
Really.
Batali voiced that very interesting sentiment at the Time magazine Person of the Year debate I mentioned earlier, where he was a panelist, along with NBC’s Brian Williams and anti-tax activist Grover Norquist, among others. Here’s what he said, verbatim, according to Time’s own transcript.
I would have to say that who has had the largest effect on the whole planet without us really paying attention across the board and everywhere is the entire banking industry and their disregard for the people that they’re supposed to be working for….So the ways the bankers have kind of toppled the way money is distributed and taken most of it into their hands is as good as Stalin or Hitler and the evil guys…They’re not heroes, but they are people that had a really huge effect on the way the world is operating.*
After the debate concluded, I asked Batali if he could elaborate on his belief in moral equivalence between the guys whose greed caused the mortgage crisis and the tyrants who slaughtered millions and reduced Europe to rubble. “Oh, that was just a metaphor,” he said. Oic But, offered the opportunity to back down from his pronouncement, he stood firm. “The way people change lives, I do think bankers change lives as much as a repressive [inaudible] autocrat. But, that said, it was more direct.” (“It” presumably meaning the Hitler/Stalin form of evil.)




more


Celebrity Chef Mario Batali Says Bankers As Bad As Hitler, Stalin - Forbes
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
#1218

Occupy What A Short Guide to Real Change - YouTube

 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
+1
#1219
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Hey!!! Who knew you two had something in common.

Until you make even a slightly concerted effort to be critical of Loc's crap, I would take your views with a grain of salt.

Nut up or shutup, brah.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1 / -1
#1220
Why does no one have the gumption to shut these sites down? Apparently they are keeping people awake at with their noise and honking of horns. Are ALL our leaders totally gutless?
 
petros
#1221
Apparently there are two avenues of approach for shutting thes sites down. If they were stupid enough to get permits and toss away their freedom of peaceful assembly and freedom of speech they can be ousted. If they have no permit the rules of the by-law don't apply which include expiry and limitations.

That's the angle they are using here.

By-laws mean nothing if they break the Charter by-Jesus.
 
Locutus
+3
#1222
Don't get mad mentalfloss, get glad.

That I personally don't find your brand of debating-society interaction very worthy of acknowledgment shouldn't limit your particpiation in any thread of your choosing. Whether you drive-by in this one (like most of us have done), enlighten us (as you can do at times) in that one or rant and rave in another, makes no difference to moi.

Please don't take it too personal that simply because someone doesn't bother to reply to one of your queries (challenges) that all is lost. That the internet is bereft of its' mind or imagined-protocol or something. Ya know son, sometimes people just aren't worth the time of day. Sometimes we just aren't as important as we think we are (or should be).

I know I'm not.

As an aside, my nutz have been slapped plenty of times over the years by Bear.

Have a nice day dude.





Occupiers scoring one over FOX.


‘Occupying Fox News’


If you can’t beat them, advertise with them. This is apparently the new adage being embraced by filmmakers who are sympathetic to the Occupy Wall Street protests. At least one director and his associates have purchased ad space on Fox News and Bloomberg Business TV, among other outlets, in an effort to bring the Occupy message to opponents.
Believe it or not, the group even bought time on “The O’Reilly Factor.” On Wednesday night, the pro-Occupy ad was slated to air three times during the program — once during the 8 p.m. time slot and two times during the program’s second showing at 11 p.m.


...




Occupy Wall Street Ads Air During O’Reilly Factor on Fox News | David Sauvage directs | Video | TheBlaze.com
 
Locutus
#1223
Occupy Wall Street Protester Wants 911 9/11s



Occupy Wall Street Protester Wants 911 911s - YouTube






Man oh man.





Man Arrested for Breaking EMT's Leg at Occupy Wall Street



A man has been arrested for allegedly attacking a paramedic and breaking his leg at the Occupy Wall Street site Wednesday night.
Police say paramedics were called to Zuccotti Park for a man who was acting irrationally.
When they arrived, the man in question appeared to be in emotional distress and police decided he needed to be taken to the hospital. But he refused to be placed in the ambulance and pushed one of the EMTs into a ladder, fracturing the EMT's leg.
The man is being charged with assault.


more


Man Arrested for Breaking EMT's Leg at Occupy Wall Street | NBC New York
 
CDNBear
+1
#1224
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Until you make even a slightly concerted effort to be critical of Loc's crap, I would take your views with a grain of salt.

You'll need more than a grain. Loc and I go way back. I know his shtick, I know him. He's never been a douche to me, even though he's called me out more than once. And I've returned the respect.

In general I like Loc. I don't have to agree with everything he says or posts (and I don't) to do that.

Maybe if you were mature enough to avoid drawing battle lines along your ideology, you'd understand stuff like that.

Quote:

Nut up or shutup, brah.

Not that anyone needs balls to post on the net, aside, I'm not your brah, or bru. You lack the experience for that honour.

Ezra Levant amp Andrew Breitbart The Mohawk Warriors Likely Means Violence At Occupy Toronto - YouTube



I agree with Ezra...

I wonder why we haven't heard about the MWS at the park here?
 
Locutus
+2
#1225
'Occupy Oakland' opens bank account at Wells Fargo





OAKLAND, Calif. -- A group of Oakland anti-Wall Street protesters who blame large banks for the economic downturn have decided that one of those institutions is the best place to stash their money for now.

Protesters at an Occupy Oakland meeting Monday voted to deposit a $20,000 donation into a Wells Fargo account. The move comes just days after one of Wells Fargo's branches was vandalized during a massive downtown demonstration.

An Occupy statement says the money only will be with Wells Fargo temporarily while they work to establish an account with a credit union or community bank. Protesters say it was the easiest way to access the money to bail out people from jail.


Wells Fargo spokesman Ruben Pulido says the move demonstrates that Occupy Oakland recognizes the value and service the bank provides its customers.


Occupy Oakland stashes $20,000 in cash at Wells Fargo 'temporarily' | abc7news.com



 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
+1
#1226
Why income inequality suddenly matters

A few weeks ago, as the Occupy Wall Street protests were first spreading, something amazing happened: For 10 whole seconds, the local reporter on my TV screen actually talked about the realities of the recession - even uttering the phrase "economic inequality."

My guess is that you've seen something similar on your local affiliate - and that's no minor event. When even the most local of television journalists are compelled to acknowledge this crushing emergency in a country whose media aggressively promotes American dream agitprop, it means the Occupy protesters have scored a monumental victory. You can almost imagine a Wall Street CEO muttering a slightly altered riff off LBJ: "If we've lost Ron Burgundy, we've lost Middle America."

In response to this stunning turn of events, conservative politicians are retreating to non sequiturs. They seem to think that if they shout the phrase "class warfare" enough, the nation will go back to not caring about the divide between the rich and poor.

But something has changed.

For most of the post-World War II era, we tolerated relatively high inequality because we envisioned it as a necessary side effect of an exceptional economy that (supposedly) guaranteed opportunities for advancement. However, as the Wall Street Journal put it, we believed that "it is OK to have ever-greater differences between rich and poor ... as long as (our) children have a good chance of grasping the brass ring."

However, in the past three decades, America has lived a different reality - one perfectly summarized by a new Federal Reserve study revealing that today's increasing inequality accompanies comparatively low social mobility.

"U.S. family income mobility has decreased over the 1969-2006 time span, and especially since the 1980s," notes the Fed paper, adding that "a family's position at (the) end of (the) 2000s was ... more correlated with its start position than was the case 20 years earlier."

Of course, some mobility still exists. The trouble is that it's primarily of the downward kind. As the Pew Charitable Trusts reports, roughly a third of those who grew up in the middle class have now fallen below that station in adulthood.

This is why data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development show that social mobility in uber-capitalist America is actually lower than in most industrialized countries.

This is why almost three-quarters of respondents just told the Hill newspaper's pollsters that income inequality is a problem.

This is why my local television news is suddenly airing pieces on economic inequality between sports, weather and all the "you stay classy" small talk.

And this is why, among all the fights over economic policy, the debate over taxes is the most crucial of all.

As the Fed noted in a separate report, the federal tax code has been the one proven way to "mitigate income inequality." But with congressional Republicans gradually flattening federal income tax rates and with already-regressive state tax rates in many GOP bastions, the tax system has lately been preserving or exacerbating existing inequality.

The good news is that if we return to the slightly higher tax rates of the recent past, then we can begin fixing things. If, though, we keep tax rates the same or make them even more regressive, then we'll be seeing a whole lot more about economic inequality on our local news as the current crisis inevitably reaches an ugly boiling point.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#1227
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post


A few weeks ago, as the Occupy Wall Street protests were first spreading, something amazing happened: For 10 whole seconds, the local reporter on my TV screen actually talked about the realities of the recession - even uttering the phrase "economic inequality."


Exactly, how do you define 'economic inequality'... It's a very impressive sounding phrase, but what does it really mean in the context of society?


Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

However, in the past three decades, America has lived a different reality - one perfectly summarized by a new Federal Reserve study revealing that today's increasing inequality accompanies comparatively low social mobility.

Interesting note on this... How has social mobility been affected during this time relative to the increases (over the same time frame) of handouts and heightened social spending?

Kinda interesting how that component was ignored by the author....


Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

"U.S. family income mobility has decreased over the 1969-2006 time span, and especially since the 1980s," notes the Fed paper, adding that "a family's position at (the) end of (the) 2000s was ... more correlated with its start position than was the case 20 years earlier."

Not surprisingly, there is strong mobility among those that did work and take chances/risks... Breakdown the different socio-economic demographics and you will observe some interesting trends, particularly among the low demographic that was content to depend on gvt subsidies for subsistence.


Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

This is why almost three-quarters of respondents just told the Hill newspaper's pollsters that income inequality is a problem.


Again, define income inequality and more importantly, how taxing those that achieve will solve the problem in the long run.


Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

As the Fed noted in a separate report, the federal tax code has been the one proven way to "mitigate income inequality." But with congressional Republicans gradually flattening federal income tax rates and with already-regressive state tax rates in many GOP bastions, the tax system has lately been preserving or exacerbating existing inequality.

Raising taxes on the achievers is disingenuous at best... In today's world, both people and capital are highly mobile. There are interesting examples of the trend domestically in the US and to think that this action will not occur over international lines is naive.
 
mentalfloss
No Party Affiliation
#1228
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Interesting note on this... How has social mobility been affected during this time relative to the increases (over the same time frame) of handouts and heightened social spending?


Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

Raising taxes on the achievers is disingenuous at best... In today's world, both people and capital are highly mobile. There are interesting examples of the trend domestically in the US and to think that this action will not occur over international lines is naive.


The Economist on "Meritocracy in America"

Don't miss this extremely valuable story in the Economist on inequality and social mobility in the US. The magazine -- which is no bastion of bleeding heart liberalism -- has issued an important warning:
A growing body of evidence suggests that the meritocratic ideal is in trouble in America. Income inequality is growing to levels not seen since the Gilded Age, around the 1880s. But social mobility is not increasing at anything like the same pace: would-be Horatio Algers are finding it no easier to climb from rags to riches, while the children of the privileged have a greater chance of staying at the top of the social heap. The United States risks calcifying into a European-style class-based society.
The evidence on social mobility is hardly encouraging to those who believe that every American has a solid chance to pull themselves up by their bootstraps:
[M]ore and more evidence from social scientists suggests that American society is much "stickier" than most Americans assume. Some researchers claim that social mobility is actually declining. A classic social survey in 1978 found that 23% of adult men who had been born in the bottom fifth of the population (as ranked by social and economic status) had made it into the top fifth. Earl Wysong of Indiana University and two colleagues recently decided to update the study. They compared the incomes of 2,749 father-and-son pairs from 1979 to 1998 and found that few sons had moved up the class ladder. Nearly 70% of the sons in 1998 had remained either at the same level or were doing worse than their fathers in 1979. The biggest increase in mobility had been at the top of society, with affluent sons moving upwards more often than their fathers had. They found that only 10% of the adult men born in the bottom quarter had made it to the top quarter.

The Economic Policy Institute also argues that social mobility has declined since the 1970s. In the 1990s 36% of those who started in the second-poorest 20% stayed put, compared with 28% in the 1970s and 32% in the 1980s. In the 1970s 12% of the population moved from the bottom fifth to either the fourth or the top fifth. In the 1980s and 1990s the figures shrank to below 11% for both decades. The figure for those who stayed in the top fifth increased slightly but steadily over the three decades, reinforcing the sense of diminished social mobility.

Not all social scientists accept the conclusion that mobility is declining. Gary Solon, of the University of Michigan, argues that there is no evidence of any change in social-mobility rates, down or up. But, at the least, most people agree that the dramatic increase in income inequality over the past two decades has not been accompanied by an equally dramatic increase in social mobility.

Take the study carried out by Thomas Hertz, an economist at American University in Washington, DC, who studied a representative sample of 6,273 American families (both black and white) over 32 years or two generations. He found that 42% of those born into the poorest fifth ended up where they started—at the bottom. Another 24% moved up slightly to the next-to-bottom group. Only 6% made it to the top fifth. Upward mobility was particularly low for black families. On the other hand, 37% of those born into the top fifth remained there, whereas barely 7% of those born into the top 20% ended up in the bottom fifth. A person born into the top fifth is over five times as likely to end up at the top as a person born into the bottom fifth.

Jonathan Fisher and David Johnson, two economists at the Bureau of Labour Statistics, looked at inequality and social mobility using measures of both income and consumption. They found that mobility "slightly decreased" in the 1990s. In 1984-90, 56% and 54% of households changed their rankings in terms of income and consumption respectively. In 1994-99, only 52% and 49% changed their rankings.

Two economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston analysed family incomes over three decades. They found that 40% of families remained stuck in the same income bracket in the 1990s, compared with 37% of families in the 1980s and 36% in the 1970s. Aaron Bernstein of Business Week points out that, even though the 1990s boom lifted pay rates for low-earners, it did not help them to get better jobs.
And, unfortunately, as the Economist points out, there are few signs of a reform movement, a substantial change from the 1880s, when growing inequality and class stratification sparked efforts to improve education, create an estate tax to prevent the concentration of wealth, bust monopolies, and so forth. It's time for that to change before the American meritocracy becomes an empty myth.

The Economist on "Meritocracy in America" - Brendan Nyhan


Understanding Mobility in America

The key findings relating to intergenerational mobility include the following:

  • Children from low-income families have only a 1 percent chance of reaching the top 5 percent of the income distribution, versus children of the rich who have about a 22 percent chance.
  • Children born to the middle quintile of parental family income ($42,000 to $54,300) had about the same chance of ending up in a lower quintile than their parents (39.5 percent) as they did of moving to a higher quintile (36.5 percent). Their chances of attaining the top five percentiles of the income distribution were just 1.8 percent.
  • Education, race, health and state of residence are four key channels by which economic status is transmitted from parent to child.
  • African American children who are born in the bottom quartile are nearly twice as likely to remain there as adults than are white children whose parents had identical incomes, and are four times less likely to attain the top quartile.
  • The difference in mobility for blacks and whites persists even after controlling for a host of parental background factors, children’s education and health, as well as whether the household was female-headed or receiving public assistance.
  • After controlling for a host of parental background variables, upward mobility varied by region of origin, and is highest (in percentage terms) for those who grew up in the South Atlantic and East South Central regions, and lowest for those raised in the West South Central and Mountain regions.
  • By international standards, the United States has an unusually low level of intergenerational mobility: our parents’ income is highly predictive of our incomes as adults. Intergenerational mobility in the United States is lower than in France, Germany, Sweden, Canada, Finland, Norway and Denmark. Among high-income countries for which comparable estimates are available, only the United Kingdom had a lower rate of mobility than the United States.

Understanding Mobility in America
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#1229
To start: Very interesting articles you posted. That said, the issue is of income distribution, social mobility and the related measures are all effects of some variable(s) where all of these elements play a role in the complex dynamic that generates the result.

To state that "income inequality" is the culprit and the source of all social ails is presumptuous... It's the chicken sh*t answer to the problem.

As per the first article from The Economist, the question is; what did the 23% that rose from the bottom to the top do differently the the remaining 77%?
 
Locutus
+1
#1230
...And what you won’t share Will be ripped from your hands






Grammy-Nominated Singer’s Violent Occupy Anthem: ‘Strung Up You’ll Bleed,’ ‘Your Blood Is Our Paint’

Are you ready for the ultra-long, seemingly violent Occupy Wall Street anthem? A new sympathetic song by singer-songwriter Joseph Arthur called, “We Stand as One,” is intended to be a rallying cry for the Occupiers.
But a close look at the lyrics provides some disturbing imagery that causes one to question what, exactly, the ballad is advocating. CNS News’ Dan Gainor has more:




more and video:

Violent Occupy Wall Street Song Called
 

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