Polar bears turn cannibalistic as climate change depletes arctic food supply


L Gilbert
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by KakatoView Post

No but our assistant manager from Baker lake was one of the guys that headed up the project to build the snowfence along the Thelon river to divert the big herds to portage in a safer place as thats when they were drowning in the same crossing they used for years.

Ah, so the Thelon not icing up for the caribou that have previously used the ice to cross only seems to be a local occurrence to you? I have news for you, there are dozens of that kind of occurrence all over the Arctic. Less snow, less ice. And that contrdicts what you've been saying and inferring since I found this thread.
You're shooting your own foot here by producing evidence against yourself.
Quote:

Yes he's Innuit and once again I never said the climate wasent changing,not once in any post I have ever made on this forum.

Oh, yeah but the ice isn't melting any different than in the past, according to a few posts of yours. If you want I can go back a few posts and bring up a few things you've said.
Quote:

In case you are ignorant on the Tuk Tuk migration they allways cross the river just west of Baker lake on their annual migration east.

Caribou move around. I knew that long before I found CC a few years back, yes.
Quote:

No shortage of food on the tundra dude.

On the ice it's different. But I'd prepare for a lot more greenery and a lot less ice if I lived up there. Probably buy a couple freezers, a smoker/dehydrator, more canning equipment, and digging a bigger garden.

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Maybe it's the talking down attitude.

After dozens of posts, your patience would get worn down, too.

Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

Do you mean that the proponents of man made climate change don't talk down to those who won't subscribe to the Gore/Suzuki mantra?????

It's got nothing to do with being man-made or not. This has to do with dozens of posts of Kak saying the ice is fine and more dozens by Ton and I providing fact after fact proving him wrong.
 
DaSleeper
+3
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

It's got nothing to do with being man-made or not. This has to do with dozens of posts of Kak saying the ice is fine and more dozens by Ton and I providing fact after fact proving him wrong.

I don't what Kakato is trying to say and the argument has been taking a strange direction, but what a lot of people think is that the habit of animals eating their young has always been there and the climate has always fluctuated and animals adapt and we better do too. the animals have adapted to humans encroaching upon their territory by moving and they also will do it to follow the food...
Right now, I'm more worried by what pollution is doing to the air we breathe than what it's doing to the climate....
I could use a few degrees warmer just about now
 
L Gilbert
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

I don't what Kakato is trying to say and the argument has been taking a strange direction, but what a lot of people think is that the habit of animals eating their young has always been there and the climate has always fluctuated and animals adapt and we better do too. the animals have adapted to humans encroaching upon their territory by moving and they also will do it to follow the food...
Right now, I'm more worried by what pollution is doing to the air we breathe than what it's doing to the climate....
I could use a few degrees warmer just about now

Pollution may affect quite a few people but climate affects EVERYONE.
 
DaSleeper
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Pollution may affect quite a few people but climate affects EVERYONE.

Sorry to be flippant but if it get's too hot take off your coat..

Humans will adapt as well as animals do...
 
L Gilbert
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

Sorry to be flippant but if it get's too hot take off your coat..

Humans will adapt as well as animals do...

Actually, humans will adapt better than most other species. If there's no ice left in the Arctic, polars cannot catch seal. They HAVE to rely on other sources. That affects their metabolisms, their physiology, etc. I doubt most will adapt fast enough. Especially if the males eat more cubs, more cubs drown, etc.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+5
#96  Top Rated Post
You know people might take you GW enthusiasts a little more serious if you toned down the defensive posture you seem to take when somebody asks a legitimate question. Instead I see people scrambling for charts and graphs and acting like they're onstage at a Jonestown Guyana Tent Revival.
 
lone wolf
+1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

Do you mean that the proponents of man made climate change don't talk down to those who won't subscribe to the Gore/Suzuki mantra?????

Sure they do. Everyone is God don'cha know. I figure man may have enhanced a natural cycle - but he sure in Hell can't stop it
 
Tonington
+1
#98
What was the legitimate question? The thread started with an article about polar bears and INCREASING CANNIBALISM that was linked to climate change, and was quickly met by denial. What followed was questions about how someone can know that particular claim is a 'load of bull' as you put it.

But sure, lets make it about defensive GW enthusiasts instead.

Weak sauce.
 
gerryh
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

What was the legitimate question? The thread started with an article about polar bears and INCREASING CANNIBALISM that was linked to climate change, and was quickly met by denial. What followed was questions about how someone can know that particular claim is a 'load of bull' as you put it.

But sure, lets make it about defensive GW enthusiasts instead.

Weak sauce.


How much do you wanna bet that RCS didn't read the entire thread?
 
Tonington
+1
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Sure they do. Everyone is God don'cha know. I figure man may have enhanced a natural cycle - but he sure in Hell can't stop it

WARNING: Science content ahead



The greenhouse forcing, graph c, is clearly the positive forcing pulling up the temperature (the black line in all 4 graphs). Natural forcings and aerosols are pulling the total forcing down, while the greenhouse forcing is pushing it up, and with much greater magnitude than the negative forcings.

Asking questions is a good thing, but ignoring answers is not.

I'd like to note, that for those bitching about the tone of this and other threads with science and policy intersections, that in other thread topics, say Muslims, or Israeli/Palestine, that when someone posts an inane piece of crap comment that is out of touch with reality, they are shouted down and ridiculed. The posts are public record for all to see.

Maybe I should start trying to nanny up those threads?

Bizarro...
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

What was the legitimate question? The thread started with an article about polar bears and INCREASING CANNIBALISM that was linked to climate change, and was quickly met by denial. What followed was questions about how someone can know that particular claim is a 'load of bull' as you put it.

But sure, lets make it about defensive GW enthusiasts instead.

Weak sauce.

It's not just this thread. And your antics were childish at best and rather demeaning at worst. Personally, I find the zealots on both sides of the debate/discussion or whatever else you want to call it pretty obstructive to any reasonable discussion.
 
lone wolf
#102
So how do things like sunspot activity, Martian warming and some previous global warming long before man could be blamed figure in?
 
Tonington
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

It's not just this thread. And your antics were childish at best and rather demeaning at worst.

Kakato is a big boy who doesn't need Nanny RCS fighting his battles for him.

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

So how do things like sunspot activity, Martian warming and some previous global warming long before man could be blamed figure in?

Natural...
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

Kakato is a big boy who doesn't need Nanny RCS fighting his battles for him.

I'm not fighting his battles. I'm just surprised at your behavior.

Like this rather ignorant snipe. It's below you.

Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

WARNING: Science content ahead



.

 
gerryh
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

It's not just this thread. And your antics were childish at best and rather demeaning at worst. Personally, I find the zealots on both sides of the debate/discussion or whatever else you want to call it pretty obstructive to any reasonable discussion.


Really? So, tell us, where did this "holier than thou" attitude suddenly come from? You have a recent epiphany?
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

Really? So, tell us, where did this "holier than thou" attitude suddenly come from? You have a recent epiphany?

Nope. I've known Ton a long time and have seen him hold his own without acting this way.

Me, I'm not as educated. I like to scrap it out.
 
gerryh
+2
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I'm not fighting his battles. I'm just surprised at your behavior.

Like this rather ignorant snipe. It's below you.


I would venture to say that Ton is getting tired of idiots like kakato. Kinda like how you feel about morons like mhz et al.
 
Tonington
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I'm not fighting his battles. I'm just surprised at your behavior.

Sure you are. It's a legitimate question to ask someone why they think claim A is bull crap. When the answers are that somebody lived there, that Claim B which nobody is interested in has happened all along, that someone should venture North of some town before they comment further, and that someone should stick to selling furnaces, well I will make no excuses for calling them on rubbish.

Quote:

Like this rather ignorant snipe. It's below you.

Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

You know people might take you GW enthusiasts a little more serious if you toned down the defensive posture you seem to take when somebody asks a legitimate question. Instead I see people scrambling for charts and graphs and acting like they're onstage at a Jonestown Guyana Tent Revival.

Well some people apparently find graphs and charts off-putting. Sarcasm, you're no virgin.

Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

I would venture to say that Ton is getting tired of idiots like kakato. Kinda like how you feel about morons like mhz et al.

Bingo!
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

Sure you are. It's a legitimate question to ask someone why they think claim A is bull crap. When the answers are that somebody lived there, that Claim B which nobody is interested in has happened all along, that someone should venture North of some town before they comment further, and that someone should stick to selling furnaces, well I will make no excuses for calling them on rubbish.





Well some people apparently find graphs and charts off-putting. Sarcasm, you're no virgin.



Bingo!

See two posts up.
 
Tonington
+1
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

Nope. I've known Ton a long time and have seen him hold his own without acting this way.

Me, I'm not as educated. I like to scrap it out.

Science isn't for people who get their feelings hurt. Try going to a conference to see for yourself, or you can take my word for it because it's on the intrewebs now and I do this everyday, have the certificates to prove it and everything.

Anyways, poorly stated claims, and certainty where it is unwarranted will get you flamed, in public even. Scientists behaving badly? We all read the selected emails stolen from CRU. No holds barred. It's ugly behind the scenes. The peer reviewed literature is cleaned up, but egos get bruised all the time. If someone can't handle it, then it's not the career for them.

I don't expect the same standards here, but at the least I would like to see that someone has something better than logical fallacies for evidence. That's no different than you and others expect in any of the topics on this forum.

------------------------------------------------------------

Anyways, let's try to bring it back to the topic of the thread. What reason does anyone have to dispute the claim that polar bear cannibalism is increasing concurrently with climate change?
 
L Gilbert
+1
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

You know people might take you GW enthusiasts a little more serious if you toned down the defensive posture you seem to take when somebody asks a legitimate question. Instead I see people scrambling for charts and graphs and acting like they're onstage at a Jonestown Guyana Tent Revival.

Enthusiasts? I can tell you that I'm not particularly enthused by global warming. But, actually in a debate or discussion, providing support for one's claims is standard operating procedure. Y sparked an interesting thought, though; on the topic of global warming, some people can accept it given the evidence. Deniers cannot accept it regardless of how much evidence there is for it. And yet deniers keep prodding for evidence. Perhaps it is futile. Perhaps even in 5 or 20 years when there really is no ice in the Arctic, or very little relative to what there was, deniers will still deny warming.

Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

WARNING: Science content ahead ........

lol.

Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

It's not just this thread. And your antics were childish at best and rather demeaning at worst. Personally, I find the zealots on both sides of the debate/discussion or whatever else you want to call it pretty obstructive to any reasonable discussion.

The discussion started out quite reasonably. What ensued was one particular poster's claiming ridiculous things without providing anything but personal anecdotes to support the claims and a couple of us providing fact after fact after fact WITH plenty of support.
So who is being unreasonable?
 
Tonington
+1
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Perhaps even in 5 or 20 years when there really is no ice in the Arctic, or very little relative to what there was, deniers will still deny warming.

This is one of my favourite animations. But I should temper that with a ditto to your comments about enthusiasm. Watch the red ice, that is the 5 year and older ice, disappear from 1982 to 2007:

 
L Gilbert
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

So how do things like sunspot activity, Martian warming and some previous global warming long before man could be blamed figure in?

They are common occurrences. So what has changed? Our planet.
 
lone wolf
+1
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

They are common occurrences. So what has changed? Our planet.

On a planet full of common and natural occurrences, how much is natural and how much is man-made (at the risk of being thought a boob by they who know it all)
 
L Gilbert
+1
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

I'm not fighting his battles. I'm just surprised at your behavior.

Like this rather ignorant snipe. It's below you.

Actually, it isn't a snipe, it is relevant research. Perhaps you can accept everyone's word that what they say is fact, but science works on more than just sayso, it works on evidence.

Suppose I made a comment in a post denying any such thing as a .338 Lapua. What would you say, as a retired soldier? You'd say I was full of shyte (not necessarily in those words). What if I kept denying it? Wouldn't you provide evidence for .338s? So, if you did provide evidence, what would you do if I kept denying it and then went about other threads saying there is no such thing as .338s? Wouldn't you prefer if I quit spreading the BS?

Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

Nope. I've known Ton a long time and have seen him hold his own without acting this way.

Me, I'm not as educated. I like to scrap it out.

Well, Ton is scrapping it out with Kak the way he scraps things out. Me, too, for that matter.

Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

Science isn't for people who get their feelings hurt...........

It's also not for people who cannot accept evidence.
Quote:

Anyways, let's try to bring it back to the topic of the thread. What reason does anyone have to dispute the claim that polar bear cannibalism is increasing concurrently with climate change?

Probably about the same as anyone has reason to support it, at least as far as the OP goes anyway. lol

Quote: Originally Posted by ToningtonView Post

This is one of my favourite animations. But I should temper that with a ditto to your comments about enthusiasm. Watch the red ice, that is the 5 year and older ice, disappear from 1982 to 2007:

Oh, good find! I'm a gonna scoop it.

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

On a planet full of common and natural occurrences, how much is natural and how much is man-made (at the risk of being thought a boob by they who know it all)

People are still trying to quantify that. But, there are good indications that we've upset a cycle drastically. I'll see if I can find the graph that shows the natural cycle of warming and cooling, but for the moment, I can describe it; it's a graph of the cycles that have occurred over many millennia and it resembles a sine wave. At the recent end of the graph, the top end of the last warming curve, the top flattens out and rises slightly for an extended period of time. That plateau just happens to coincide with the advent of large amounts of pollution supplied by, you guessed it, human industry growth. We extended the warming curve. Why do we think this? By mostly geological study of ice cores and ground cores. Biologists can also add their two bits by studying the various flora and fauna , living and dead, that were caught in the ice and ground strata.
Last edited by L Gilbert; Jan 14th, 2012 at 12:30 AM..
 
Kakato
#116
Ahhhh,the graphs have arrived! You folks have fun while I'm on my way to my next adventure.I am happy as I set up a well known bud in the Arctic to take over logistics tonight at the gig I had south of Cambridge bay last year.
He is one happy camper and is very experienced in the ways of the north and like me laughs at the numptys that post graphs to make up for their complete lack of knowledge of the Arctic,graphs allways make you look lame but I'm used to seeing this as are most that have been there.
I'm off to Saskatchewan in a few days to go exploit their oil,I figure 2 years and i'll be in retirement mode and maybe I'll buy a house there as I'm going to follow the money for a bit before the envirowankers try to shut it down to with more graphs and non educational B.S. that makes no sense.
I really dont care about what others say about the Arctic or their lack of experience in the north,they are only doing what I predicted and thats fearmongering over something they have no clue about,Tonnington has never been to the Arctic....but he has graphs.
This attitude will hurt the arctic for many years and the people that live there and that makes me sad,numptys that wouldnt last a day in the north preaching about whats best for the people in the north that live there and they are telling them whats best for them?
Well folks,you can keep this up and hurt the people you think your saveing(Tonnington) or you can go up north and then educate yourself and see how big a fool you look like to the natives.Trust me....they will laugh at you but then you would never go up there,you would be the town laughingstock if you ever did manage to leave your nice warm home and visit the other side.

I know that when it comes time for an exploration company to get someone to make things happen in the north I will be called,not someone with some non sensical graphs that dont really mean nothing unless your sucking for a govt. grant.

Later folks,it was a slice!

Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Ah, so the Thelon not icing up for the caribou that have previously used the ice to cross only seems to be a local occurrence to you? I have news for you, there are dozens of that kind of occurrence all over the Arctic. Less snow, less ice. And that contrdicts what you've been saying and inferring since I found this thread.
You're shooting your own foot here by producing evidence against yourself.
Oh, yeah but the ice isn't melting any different than in the past, according to a few posts of yours. If you want I can go back a few posts and bring up a few things you've said.
Caribou move around. I knew that long before I found CC a few years back, yes.
On the ice it's different. But I'd prepare for a lot more greenery and a lot less ice if I lived up there. Probably buy a couple freezers, a smoker/dehydrator, more canning equipment, and digging a bigger garden.

After dozens of posts, your patience would get worn down, too.

It's got nothing to do with being man-made or not. This has to do with dozens of posts of Kak saying the ice is fine and more dozens by Ton and I providing fact after fact proving him wrong.

You havent proven me wrong,you just showed your a numpty that has internet experience,sorry but thats not good enough to sway me.
Blows me away how many people are experts on the north yet they have never been there,too funny.
I know the ice,I know the seasons and the weather anomalies that take place,something you wont see in any graph.My life and that of my mates depended on it and it's called experience,I dont think theres a single person that has worked in the north that would take tonnington seriously.
He has never been there,he's a numpty as we like to call them and I have zero respect for numptys as do every single Innuit I have worked and lived with.
The kabluna has to earn respect in the arctic,it took me a few years of listening to the hunters and elders before I earned mine.Most of you have no idea what it's like on the other side.
Last edited by Kakato; Jan 14th, 2012 at 02:07 AM..
 
Tonington
+1
#117
Quote: Originally Posted by KakatoView Post

Tonnington has never been to the Arctic....but he has graphs.

Tonington lived in Rankin Inlet for four years, and in Pine Point for one. Not that it matters. The truth about polar bears isn't dependent on where I live, or where I've been. That's some wonky logic.

Quote:

Well folks,you can keep this up and hurt the people you think your saveing(Tonnington) or you can go up north and then educate yourself and see how big a fool you look like to the natives.

Hurt? You were the one talking about fear mongering. Just provide some evidence that the prevalence of cannibalism isn't rising. You said it was bull crap, but you have nothing empirical at all. It's a fantasy world you're living in if you think you've addressed your claim.

The status quo does not preserve the way of life for the Inuit.

Despite your protestations, researchers in fact are listening to the inhabitants of the Arctic, and incorporating their observations in research programs. Here's the Executive Summary from the final report of the Inuit Observations on Climate Change (external - login to view) program:
Observations by the Inuvialuit of Sachs Harbour support what has long been predicted―that climate change would be felt first in the Polar Regions. This community’s way of life is at risk, an urgent warning of the negative impacts of climate change predicted to occur elsewhere in the world.

On Banks Island in Canada’s High Arctic, Inuvialuit hunters and trappers have a close relationship with the natural world. As they travel over the tundra or harvest fish from the sea, they notice even the smallest changes to their environment. Recently, the changes have been significant and worrying. The climate has become unpredictable; the landscape unfamiliar.

Autumn freeze-up occurs up to a month later than usual and the spring thaw seems earlier every year. The multi-year sea-ice is smaller and now drifts far from the community in the summer, taking with it the seals upon which the community relies for food. In the winter the sea-ice is thin and broken, making travel dangerous for even the most experienced hunters. In the fall, storms have become frequent and severe, making boating difficult. Thunder and lightning have been seen for the first time.

Hot weather in the summer is melting the permafrost and causing large-scale slumping on the coastline and along the shores of inland lakes. The melting has already caused one inland lake to drain into the ocean, killing the freshwater fish. In the town of Sachs Harbour, building foundations are shifting from the melting.

New species of birds such as barn swallows and robins are arriving on the island. In the nearby waters, salmon have been caught for the first time. On the land, an influx of flies and mosquitoes are making life difficult for humans and animals.
These changes tell local people that the climate is warming. The residents of Sachs Harbour wonder if they can maintain their way of life if these changes continue.

Given the dramatic changes that local people have observed, IISD and the Hunters and Trappers Committee of Sachs Harbour initiated a two-year project to document the problem of Arctic climate change and communicate it to Canadian and international audiences. The project team worked in partnership with specialists from five organizations to develop an innovative method for recording and sharing local observations on climate change. The approach combined participatory workshops, semi-structured interviews, community meetings and fieldwork to better understand the extent of local knowledge of climate change. During the two-year initiative, the project team produced a broadcast-quality video and published seven scientific journal articles to communicate the consequences of climate change in the Arctic and to understand the adaptive strategies that local people are using in response. The science papers document the extent of Inuvialuit knowledge on climate change and explore how that knowledge can enrich scientific research in the Arctic. The video follows local people onto the land and sea as they partake in traditional activities. Their voices―and the beauty of a fragile and bountiful land― leave viewers with a clear understanding of what will be lost if climate change continues.

In November 2000, the video was launched concurrently in The Hague, Ottawa and Sachs Harbour with additional screenings in Yellowknife and Winnipeg. The launch attracted considerable media attention. A well-developed communications strategy meant that the story was picked up by 12 newswire services, 24 U.S. papers (with a cumulative circulation of over four million), 20 Canadian papers (with a cumulative circulation of almost three million), Maclean’s, Panorama and Outside magazines(cumulative circulation of two million), and at least 22 major online sources including National Geographic.com, @Discovery.ca, One World Net, ABC News.com and CNN.com. The project team took part in nine major radio interview including ABC Radio, BBC, Radio Netherlands, CBC As It Happens, CBC Syndication (13 separate city interviews), CBC Radio International, KWAB, Great Lakes Radio Consortium (140 stations in 10 U.S. states) and CFAX Radio. The project was also covered on 14 major television networks including Associated Press Television Network (worldwide 330 broadcasters), BBC, France 1, France 2, ARD Television Swiss Romande, National Geographic channel, CBC (the National), CTV, Global, CBC Canada Now, CBC Newsworld, Discovery Channel and the Aboriginal Peoples' TV Network. There were an additional 28 print, radio and Internet stories on the project prior to the launch.

The video was also screened or distributed at key decision making forums including: the Joint Ministerial Meeting of Environment and Energy Ministers (October 16, 2000); Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting (October 12–13, 2000); Government of Nunavut Legislative Assembly (October 16, 2000); National Round Table on Environment and Economy (November 9, 2000); 6th Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP-6) in The Hague, Netherlands (November 16–24, 2000); House of Commons Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs, Northern Development and Natural Resources; World Environment Day Forum in Italy (June 4–6, 2001); and the Western Premiers’ Conference (May 30th to June 1st, 2001).

Presentations at 17 conferences and workshop communicated the project’s findings and approach to other researchers.

Final workshops were held in Ottawa and Sachs Harbour. The Ottawa event brought together project team members, funding partners and relevant individuals from other organizations that were interested in the work. The objective of the Ottawa and Sachs Harbour workshops was to review the project, watch the video and discuss a strategy for communicating the project results and refining and replicating the approach elsewhere. To this end, IISD has followed up on the outcomes of the workshop and has developed several proposals in partnership with relevant organizations. To date these proposals include:

  • Facilitating a series of workshops with the five other communities in the Inuvialuit settlement region to obtain a region-wide perspective on climate change. This project is being implemented in partnership with the Inuit Tapirisat of Canada, the Inuvialuit Game Council and the local Hunters and Trappers Committees (HTCs). Funding for this project has been provided by the Northern Ecosystem Initiative.
  • Producing a teachers guide to accompany the full-length version of the video. The guide would be consistent with the Pan-Canadian Protocol on Science Curriculum Development, enabling its use by any school in Canada. This initiative would be led by Manitoba Department of Education and Training and Learning for a Sustainable Future (an Ottawa-based NGO that develops sustainable development materials for school teachers) with input from IISD and the Sachs Harbour HTC. A proposal has been submitted to the Sustainable Development Innovations Fund in Manitoba to produce the guide and distribute copies of the video and the guide to all high schools in the province.
  • Producing a French version of the full-length video to provide a broader Canadian and international audience with access to the project’s results. A proposal is in the final stages of development with funders yet to be identified.
  • A concept paper to scale up the Sachs Harbour research has been developed. The strategy involves testing and refining the workshop methodology in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, training other organizations in conducting the research to allow local observations to be collected throughout the Arctic region, piloting the use of videos as a tool for communities to document and share local observations on climate change and, finally, extending the successful elements to other circumpolar countries.
  • IISD will also continue to profile the project results with researchers, decision-makers and the public whenever possible and appropriate.
This project was made possible through the support and initiative of the community of Sachs Harbour and financial contributions from: the Government of Canada’s Climate Change Action Fund (Public Education and Outreach); the Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation; the Government of Canada’s Climate Change Action Fund (Science, Impacts and Adaptation); Indian and Northern Affairs Canada; and the Government of the Northwest Territories. Generous in-kind support was given by the Hunters and Trappers Committee of Sachs Harbour; the Inuvialuit Game Council; the Inuvialuit Joint Secretariat; the Inuvialuit Communications Society; the Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba; the Department of Fisheries and Oceans; the Government of the Northwest Territories; the Geological Survey of Canada; and the International Institute for Sustainable Development.
 
Kakato
#118
Look Tonnington,untill you actually visit the arctic your a numpty,you have no experience and most Innuit couldnt give 2 ****s about your graphs so get some experience in the arctic and maybe we'll talk,untill then your just a numpty with an internet connection and a search engine and not a clue period,you would get laughed out of any Innuit community with your graphs.

Oh...Pine point,ya,where my stepdads mom and dad grew up and my stepdad grew up.My stepdad knows everyone in pine point,tread very carefull here bud,Small world,I know lots of peeps from there.

Did they laugh you out of the community or what?
You deleted your post that im responding to,thats sad.

Have fun folks,off to saskabush in a few days.Lot's of oil to get out of the ground and a six figure salary to boot!
Last edited by Kakato; Jan 14th, 2012 at 03:01 AM..
 
JLM
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by KakatoView Post

Look Tonnington,untill you actually visit the arctic your a numpty,you have no experience and most Innuit couldnt give 2 ****s about your graphs so get some experience in the arctic and maybe we'll talk,untill then your just a numpty with an internet connection and a search engine and not a clue period,you would get laughed out of any Innuit community with your graphs.

Oh...Pine point,ya,where my stepdads mom and dad grew up and my stepdad grew up.My stepdad knows everyone in pine point,tread very carefull here bud,Small world,I know lots of peeps from there.

Did they laugh you out of the community or what?
You deleted your post that im responding to,thats sad.

Have fun folks,off to saskabush in a few days.Lot's of oil to get out of the ground and a six figure salary to boot!

I guess it's what you could call "book smart" and "experience challenged"!
 
Tonington
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I guess it's what you could call "book smart" and "experience challenged"!

Yup, as with the rest of this thread, I guess running a camp means Kakato knows better than everyone else, including the Innuit who have made observations themselves and lived their whole lives there. What gall.

I'd rather be book smart and camp management challenged than a dumb ***.
 

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