What Emergency Act?

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Yup you weren’t supposed to notice the American registered plane circling Ottawant .
The Jan. 27 directive stipulated that Canadian Forces vehicles and personnel were to avoid the Ottawa protest and Royal Canadian Air Force planes were not to fly over the “Freedom Convoy” demonstration….so You were especially not supposed to notice it over Ottawa on Jan. 28, Jan. 29, Feb. 3, Feb. 10 and Feb. 11.

I wonder how many foreign registered military aircraft overfly Washington DC repeatedly in a specific pattern indicative of surveillance of activities on the ground day after day after day, etc…???
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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The Jan. 27 directive stipulated that Canadian Forces vehicles and personnel were to avoid the Ottawa protest and Royal Canadian Air Force planes were not to fly over the “Freedom Convoy” demonstration….so You were especially not supposed to notice it over Ottawa on Jan. 28, Jan. 29, Feb. 3, Feb. 10 and Feb. 11.

I wonder how many foreign registered military aircraft overfly Washington DC repeatedly in a specific pattern indicative of surveillance of activities on the ground day after day after day, etc…???
Be sure to mutter darkly.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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A parliamentary committee is weighing whether Wellington Street and other nearby streets that currently fall under the City of Ottawa’s jurisdiction should be in the hands of the federal government.

Months after the convoy left, Wellington Street is still closed to most traffic, with only House of Commons vehicles and deliveries able to use the route.

Speaking at that committee Tuesday, Conservative MP Andrew Scheer asked Ottawa Police chief Steve Bell if he had asked directly for the government to invoke the Emergencies Act.

Bell said they didn’t ask for the act.
Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino said police forces told them they needed powers to protect, powers contained within the act.

With another police chief saying they didn’t ask for the federal government’s Emergencies Act, Liberal cabinet ministers are continuing to insist the move was necessary to clear the Freedom Convoy from Ottawa’s streets.

Bell is the second police official to confirm his force didn’t ask for the invocation of the Emergencies Act, after RCMP commissioner Brenda Lucki revealed the same detail last week to another parliamentary committee studying the invocation of the act.

Somebody wanted the Emergencies Act enacted, but it wasn’t law enforcement apparently like Liberal MP’s kept claiming… so….? At least the NDP/Liberal non-coalition coalition is out’a the closet though?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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During the Emergencies Act, the banks suddenly became the tip of Ottawa’s spear in its shutdown of the trucker protest. They deliberately caused extreme financial pain for some of their customers by freezing the accounts of alleged protesters and their supporters. And they did so without ever publicly questioning the legitimacy of the government’s order or challenging its constitutionality in court. Not every industry abandons its supposedly beloved clientele so quickly or so meekly.

On February 15, a day after the invocation of the Emergencies Act, the federal government issued an Emergency Economic Measures Order compelling Canadian banks and other financial institutions to cease all dealings with individuals “engaged, directly or indirectly, in an activity” deemed illegal by the government.

The banks were essentially handed a list of names by the RCMP, as Angelina Mason, vice-president of the Canadian Bankers Association, explained to the House of Commons Finance Committee in March. If the names and transactions matched their customer records, the accounts were immediately frozen. At least 257 accounts were blocked in this way. Given the expansive manner in which the order was described, however, anyone who gave even $20 to the protest movement could have found themselves unable to access their own money, had the RCMP put them on its list.

The most unsettling aspect of this new and unprecedented financial threat is confusion about who actually wields the power. In his committee testimony, RCMP Assistant Commissioner Michel Arcand claimed the emergency order “gave financial institutions the ability to freeze financial products of individuals and companies suspected of involvement in prohibited activities.” To hear the cops tell it, they just provided a list of suggested names and the banks took it from there. But when asked if it was possible for a bank to refuse to freeze an account of someone whose name appeared on the RCMP’s list, Ms. Mason of the bankers’ association said it was “a legal obligation” to lock down EVERY name.


Claims that the banks decided which accounts to freeze are meant to perpetuate the idea that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms remained in effect throughout the Emergencies Act. A bank can lock down any customer’s account based on its own internal risk assessment without affecting anyone’s Charter rights. But if governments want to do that, they need a court order. It’s called due process. Bypassing of the courts means the Charter wasn’t in effect.

Rest at the link….
 

pgs

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During the Emergencies Act, the banks suddenly became the tip of Ottawa’s spear in its shutdown of the trucker protest. They deliberately caused extreme financial pain for some of their customers by freezing the accounts of alleged protesters and their supporters. And they did so without ever publicly questioning the legitimacy of the government’s order or challenging its constitutionality in court. Not every industry abandons its supposedly beloved clientele so quickly or so meekly.

On February 15, a day after the invocation of the Emergencies Act, the federal government issued an Emergency Economic Measures Order compelling Canadian banks and other financial institutions to cease all dealings with individuals “engaged, directly or indirectly, in an activity” deemed illegal by the government.

The banks were essentially handed a list of names by the RCMP, as Angelina Mason, vice-president of the Canadian Bankers Association, explained to the House of Commons Finance Committee in March. If the names and transactions matched their customer records, the accounts were immediately frozen. At least 257 accounts were blocked in this way. Given the expansive manner in which the order was described, however, anyone who gave even $20 to the protest movement could have found themselves unable to access their own money, had the RCMP put them on its list.

The most unsettling aspect of this new and unprecedented financial threat is confusion about who actually wields the power. In his committee testimony, RCMP Assistant Commissioner Michel Arcand claimed the emergency order “gave financial institutions the ability to freeze financial products of individuals and companies suspected of involvement in prohibited activities.” To hear the cops tell it, they just provided a list of suggested names and the banks took it from there. But when asked if it was possible for a bank to refuse to freeze an account of someone whose name appeared on the RCMP’s list, Ms. Mason of the bankers’ association said it was “a legal obligation” to lock down EVERY name.


Claims that the banks decided which accounts to freeze are meant to perpetuate the idea that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms remained in effect throughout the Emergencies Act. A bank can lock down any customer’s account based on its own internal risk assessment without affecting anyone’s Charter rights. But if governments want to do that, they need a court order. It’s called due process. Bypassing of the courts means the Charter wasn’t in effect.

Rest at the link….
Charter , what charter ? Never has it been worth the paper it is printed on
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Following due process may be inconvenient and time-consuming for a government panicked about a raucous trucker protest. But it is certainly not impossible. Ontario obtained just such a court order five days before the federal government opted to go the nuclear route.

The legally slippery nature of the freeze orders clearly redounds on the Trudeau government. But it is equally remarkable that the banks went along with such a betrayal of their customers’ best interests without raising a ruckus of any kind.


Not every industry so willingly abandons its clients without a fight. In 2014, for example, police in the Peel Region of Toronto ordered Rogers and Telus to hand over a massive set of data from dozens of cell phone towers in an attempt to solve a puzzling rash of robberies. While both companies say they respond to routine production orders on a regular basis, the Peel Region “tower dump” order was so sweeping — entailing information on the location of over 43,000 law-abiding citizens — that they felt compelled to challenge its legality on behalf of their customers.

A final court ruling in 2016 both affirmed the companies’ standing to defend their customers’ privacy rights and chastised the original order as “unconstitutional.” It was a clear win for Canadian citizens. But such an outcome was only possible because private businesses stood up to the government in court. Whatever you might think about Canada’s cosseted cell phone industry, Telus and Rogers spent their own resources in a principled defence of their customers’ rights. Put in the same squeeze, Canada’s banks embarrassed themselves with their lack of gumption and principles.

“Any of the banks could have challenged the lawfulness of the order made pursuant to the Emergencies Act, and applied for an injunction pending the hearing of the case,” says Queen’s University law professor Bruce Pardy in an interview. It might not have succeeded but “at least it would have sent a signal that they regarded their customers’ interests as sacrosanct and objected to being strong-armed by the government.”

And how were the banks rewarded for being such loyal servants of the federal government? A few weeks later, Ottawa’s 2022 budget hit the banking sector with billions in new taxes, including a special, higher corporate tax rate.

Perhaps now the banks appreciate how their customers felt in February.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
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Following due process may be inconvenient and time-consuming for a government panicked about a raucous trucker protest. But it is certainly not impossible. Ontario obtained just such a court order five days before the federal government opted to go the nuclear route.

The legally slippery nature of the freeze orders clearly redounds on the Trudeau government. But it is equally remarkable that the banks went along with such a betrayal of their customers’ best interests without raising a ruckus of any kind.


Not every industry so willingly abandons its clients without a fight. In 2014, for example, police in the Peel Region of Toronto ordered Rogers and Telus to hand over a massive set of data from dozens of cell phone towers in an attempt to solve a puzzling rash of robberies. While both companies say they respond to routine production orders on a regular basis, the Peel Region “tower dump” order was so sweeping — entailing information on the location of over 43,000 law-abiding citizens — that they felt compelled to challenge its legality on behalf of their customers.

A final court ruling in 2016 both affirmed the companies’ standing to defend their customers’ privacy rights and chastised the original order as “unconstitutional.” It was a clear win for Canadian citizens. But such an outcome was only possible because private businesses stood up to the government in court. Whatever you might think about Canada’s cosseted cell phone industry, Telus and Rogers spent their own resources in a principled defence of their customers’ rights. Put in the same squeeze, Canada’s banks embarrassed themselves with their lack of gumption and principles.

“Any of the banks could have challenged the lawfulness of the order made pursuant to the Emergencies Act, and applied for an injunction pending the hearing of the case,” says Queen’s University law professor Bruce Pardy in an interview. It might not have succeeded but “at least it would have sent a signal that they regarded their customers’ interests as sacrosanct and objected to being strong-armed by the government.”

And how were the banks rewarded for being such loyal servants of the federal government? A few weeks later, Ottawa’s 2022 budget hit the banking sector with billions in new taxes, including a special, higher corporate tax rate.

Perhaps now the banks appreciate how their customers felt in February.
Your government at work in the best interests of your government .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Again and again and again, we have seen evidence that the Trudeau government grossly overreacted to the convoy’s blockade. And yet when they are confronted by proof of this foolishness, they double down to prove their imposition of our country’s most draconian law was justified.

The persecution of Lich fits into this pattern.

Two weeks ago it was RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki telling the joint Commons-Senate committee investigating the use of the Emergencies Act that Mounties had not asked for the act to be imposed. This week it was interim Ottawa Police Chief Steve Bell telling another Parliamentary committee his force didn’t ask either.

Ditto the Ontario Provincial Police and Gatineau police across the river in Quebec. When it comes to the convoy, the Trudeau Liberals are entirely delusional.


Despite all evidence to the contrary, the Liberals still seem convinced the Freedom Convoy threatened the very existence of our nation, and still does. They imagine sinister forces are still plotting to overthrow them. And anyone – even a judge – who does not share this desperate paranoia is naïve, or maybe even in on the plot.

Bizarre. Excessive. And indicative of an elite class that has lost its collective mind. At a bail hearing on Thursday, the federal government tried hard to have Tamara Lich returned to jail.

Lich, one of the organizers of February’s Freedom Convoy, has been free on bail for the past couple of months awaiting trial on charges of mischief and counselling others to commit mischief, plus obstructing police and intimidation.

Now the federal government is alleging Lich has violated her bail conditions and should be sent back to lockup.

As part of her March 7 bail agreement, Lich has been ordered to stay off social media. So did Assistant Crown Attorney Moiz Karimjee demand Lich be rearrested because she has been tweeting up a storm? Nope.

She also agreed to stay out of Ontario. Check. Been in Alberta the whole time.

And she must refrain from supporting “anything related to the Freedom Convoy.”

So the feds must have proof Lich is plotting another blockade – Freedom Convoy 2.0 – right? Not a scrap.

What has the federal Justice department so riled up is the announcement that Lich will receive an award for standing up for Canadians’ Charter freedoms. In June. Maybe in Toronto. (?)

The feds are so worried that Lich is a dangerous individual capable of pulling down Parliament that the very thought of her receiving an award in the future, perhaps somewhere in Ontario, has caused them to have a fit.

The federal lawyer, Karimjee, was so testy during Thursday’s hearing he became abrupt with and rude to the judge.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Kevin Phillips took the unusual step of cautioning Karimjee to maintain his “demeanour” and not violate the decorum of the court.

When Justice Phillips appeared to question whether Lich’s acceptance of an award constituted material support for the convoy, Karimjee shot back that the judge should step aside from Lich’s hearing because of perceived bias. 😳

It is highly unusual for a Crown lawyer (or any lawyer) to insist a judge step aside in the middle of a bail hearing. And I think it is an indication of just how detached the federal government has become from reality and how out of proportion their fear of the threat presented by the convoy is.
 

Jinentonix

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1) Am I the only one who found it odd that it took a private Ottawa citizen to get a court injunction to stop the honking? The Mayor "couldn't" do it. The Chief of Police "couldn't" do it. Not even the PM could do it. Nope, none of them had the power of a single private citizen, or so they'd have you believe.

2) it would appear that any prolonged inconvenience to the "fine residents of Ottawa" constitutes an existential threat to the ROC.

3) Kind'a funny how Trudeau wants you to believe that Canada is just crawling with nazi types but Putin's anti-nazi excuse for invading Ukraine is not to be taken seriously. (not that I do, I'm just sayin')

4) The Canadian leftards that whined about how much Trump lied have no problem being lied right to their face, as long as it's the "right person" doing the lying.

5) There was absolutely ZERO need to bust out the Emergencies Act as all three levels of police (and the mayors of border cities) have the authority and the tools required to bust up those kinds of protests without resorting to Groper going for yet another power grab.

6) Kind'a hard to take Prince Groper seriously when he whines about Canadians losing faith in our institutions while he works extra hard to undermine those very institutions.
 
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petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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5) There was absolutely ZERO need to bust out the Emergencies Act as all three levels of police (and the mayors of border cities) have the authority and the tools required to bust up those kinds of protests without resorting to Groper going for yet another power grab.
Trudeau has zero say in how they operate without the Emergency Act.

He is a control freak. Every tyrant is a control freak.
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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5) There was absolutely ZERO need to bust out the Emergencies Act as all three levels of police (and the mayors of border cities) have the authority and the tools required to bust up those kinds of protests without resorting to Groper going for yet another power grab.
There was an URGENT need!

To quote a famous man*

Buzz: This is no time to panic.

Woody: This is a PERFECT time to panic!

* Well, sort of.
 

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
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Olympus Mons
1) Am I the only one who found it odd that it took a private Ottawa citizen to get a court injunction to stop the honking? The Mayor "couldn't" do it. The Chief of Police "couldn't" do it. Not even the PM could do it. Nope, none of them had the power of a single private citizen, or so they'd have you believe.
Thinking further on this, maybe the woman from the above post should run for office. Clearly she can get shit done without violating anyone's rights in the process.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Thinking further on this, maybe the woman from the above post should run for office. Clearly she can get shit done without violating anyone's rights in the process.
NO! You WANT to turn her into a tax-sucking waste of oxygen?

"Power tend to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."
--Lord Acton
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Whatever this (annual?) thing in Toronto today was….I’m assuming there was more police injuries, shootings, stabbings, assaults (civilians upon civilians as opposed to police upon civilians which doesn’t seem to count) and it’s still going on….than during the entire three weeks of the trucker convoy goat rodeo.


Will Justin/Jagmeet retreat to the Batcave (hidden under Rideau Cottage but Shhhh) and enact the Emergencies Act from under the bed (?) or only if this was to happen in Ottawa?
 

pgs

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Whatever this (annual?) thing in Toronto today was….I’m assuming there was more police injuries, shootings, stabbings, assaults (civilians upon civilians as opposed to police upon civilians which doesn’t seem to count) and it’s still going on….than during the entire three weeks of the trucker convoy goat rodeo.


Will Justin/Jagmeet retreat to the Batcave (hidden under Rideau Cottage but Shhhh) and enact the Emergencies Act from under the bed (?) or only if this was to happen in Ottawa?
That’s just the religion of peace letting off a little steam . It doesn’t count for anything .