Two years into the Trudeau 2.0 Minority Term, which day will Justin call the election that only he wants?

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,840
1,733
113
Only7 a complete idiot would believe everything that comes from a government financed media. In less civilized parts of the world, these are called propaganda outlets.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,540
8,262
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Well, this is interesting. This last weeks scandals & shenanigans include:
1) More out about ArriveCan…
2) More out about the Winnipeg Lab Chinese Scientists CPC thing…
3) Announcement of the non-Pharmacare non-universal non-deal deal to extend the non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition between the Liberal/NDPs & the NDP/Liberals..
4) The Bill Censorship-63 Internet thing that they’re claiming is to just to protect the children but also is an omnibus kettle of fish…
5) The Canadian Housing Accelerator Plan showing its cracks to expose itself for what it really is…
6) Trudeau & Italy’s Meloni not being able to meet in Toronto due to Hamas/Palestine protesters, etc…
1709516264684.jpegBut…Trudeau flew into Alberta and out without announcing it to the Alberta gov’t and slagged Alberta for an Eastern audience…& is throwing out a “No Soup For You!” in Saskatchewan’s direction to show he’s a strongman…so what happened in the polls this week??

The Conservatives & NDP/Liberals went down, but the Liberal/NDP’s went up in Eastern Canadian ridings. Go figure…
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The Liberal/NDP’s potentially went up 2 seats in ON from the Conservatives (due to the anti-Alberta stance ‘cuz just western rednecks in Alberta that don’t know what’s good for them) & 1 in Labrador from the NDP/Liberals (due to Jagmeet settling for magic beans instead of anything of any substance).
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,540
8,262
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Well, probably not an election anytime soon (or before Oct 20th, 2024) at this point.
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Conservatives are rapidly approaching a 50 per cent voter share in polls, which would effectively move them from the current projection of “Conservative supermajority” to “Conservative hypermajority.”
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A new Mainstreet Research poll has the Tories at 46 per cent against 25 per cent for the Liberals and 15 per cent for the NDP.
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When those results are modelled, you get things that haven’t happened in a generation, such as most Vancouver ridings going Conservative, and Tories capturing every single seat touching Quebec City.
1710300860544.jpeg
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Canada’s only remaining Liberal provincial premier called on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to stop his planned carbon price hike next month, saying its increase would compound the affordability crisis that his constituents and all Canadians are facing.
The federal carbon price is set to go up by $15 on April 1, from $65 to $80 per tonne. The federal charge is applied in all provinces except British Columbia and Quebec, which have their own provincial carbon pricing systems.
The carbon price is so unpopular in Atlantic Canada that Liberal MPs campaigned last year for changes. In response, the government in part exempted home heating oil from the carbon price for more than three years. That type of fuel is more commonly used on the East Coast (Shhhhhh….). At the time the government cited affordability concerns as one of the reasons for the change.

However, the decision was widely criticized because it disproportionately favoured households in a (Formerly?) Liberal stronghold and didn’t give the same treatment to people who use other fuels to heat their home. Saskatchewan has since refused to collect the carbon price on natural gas.
(This is from the Minister of Environment and Climate Change of Canada)
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,072
3,071
113
Liberals introduce legislation updating Elections Act, in keeping with NDP pact
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Mar 20, 2024 • 3 minute read

OTTAWA — The Liberal government has tabled legislation that updates the federal Elections Act as part of its political pact with the NDP.


The minister responsible for democratic institutions, Dominic LeBlanc, said the changes “will enhance Canadians’ ability to exercise their vote while strengthening protections against foreign interference in our elections.”


The bill, if passed, would add two more days of advance voting, make a campus voting program permanent and “take steps toward” allowing voters to cast their ballots at any polling station in their riding.

It also proposes to add dedicated on-site voting for people who live in long-term care homes and improve the process for mail-in voting.

LeBlanc, who is also public safety minister, pointed out that the amendments come out of a collaboration with New Democrats.

MP Daniel Blaikie negotiated the bill for the NDP. He appeared alongside LeBlanc for what he said would likely be his last media availability on Parliament Hill before his resignation at the end of the month. He is headed for a job with Manitoba’s premier.


“There are often Canadians who are struggling to balance the obligations of work and family in a day as well as get to polling stations in order to be able to vote,” Blaikie said.

“And that’s why we felt it was very important to try to expand access and have more days upon which Canadians could vote.”

The bill includes a study to expand federal elections to a three-day voting period rather than a single election day.

That falls short of the Liberal-NDP agreement, which promised that the parties would work together to make that a reality.

LeBlanc said the intention was to have elections fall on a Saturday, Sunday and Monday, as well as for people to be able to vote from any polling place in their riding right away.

But Elections Canada “identified some reasonable concerns,” including the challenge of finding “suitable locations” for polling places over a three-day period.


“Elections Canada came to us with some thoughtful operational challenges,” said LeBlanc.

“We think that they need to be mandated by Parliament to come back with a precise timeline of how we can get to that. We thought it was a very reasonable objective.”

The bill also updates the Canada Elections Act to account for new technology, such as artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency.

It clarifies that deepfakes, realistic simulations of public figures such as politicians created with AI technology, are covered under existing offences in the act. Those offences include publishing false statements to affect election results and impersonation.

LeBlanc said the deepfakes “are certainly something that the security services have talked to me about in terms of strengthening our ability to resist foreign interference.”


He said if a foreign state or hostile actor was using “artificial intelligence in a way that is designed to sabotage an electoral process, we think Elections Canada should properly have in the legislation the tools to deal with that.”

The act will also prohibit contributions in the form of crypto-assets, as well as money orders or pre-paid gift cards. The idea is to ban contributions that difficult to trace, the government says.

The bill introduced Wednesday would also include a new prohibition on statements about activities related to the election or voting process if the intent is to disrupt the election. It would apply in cases where the person knows the statement is false or misleading.

The bill also includes new requirements for privacy policies of federal political parties. They will have to put in place “physical, organizational, and technological security safeguards,” the government says.


Political parties will also have to have protocols for notifying individuals if a serious breach takes place, examples that illustrate how they collect and use personal information, and prohibitions against selling personal information, among other rules.

The New Democrats are supporting the minority Liberals on key House of Commons votes in exchange for progress on shared priorities.

The two-year anniversary of the deal, known as a confidence-and-supply agreement, is later this week.

Federal law requires that the next election be held no later than October 2025.

LeBlanc said the intention is for parliamentarians to “ensure that this legislation can be in place as quickly as possible” so updates are ready by then.
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,754
3,621
113
Edmonton
Liberals introduce legislation updating Elections Act, in keeping with NDP pact
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Mar 20, 2024 • 3 minute read

OTTAWA — The Liberal government has tabled legislation that updates the federal Elections Act as part of its political pact with the NDP.


The minister responsible for democratic institutions, Dominic LeBlanc, said the changes “will enhance Canadians’ ability to exercise their vote while strengthening protections against foreign interference in our elections.”


The bill, if passed, would add two more days of advance voting, make a campus voting program permanent and “take steps toward” allowing voters to cast their ballots at any polling station in their riding.

It also proposes to add dedicated on-site voting for people who live in long-term care homes and improve the process for mail-in voting.

LeBlanc, who is also public safety minister, pointed out that the amendments come out of a collaboration with New Democrats.

MP Daniel Blaikie negotiated the bill for the NDP. He appeared alongside LeBlanc for what he said would likely be his last media availability on Parliament Hill before his resignation at the end of the month. He is headed for a job with Manitoba’s premier.


“There are often Canadians who are struggling to balance the obligations of work and family in a day as well as get to polling stations in order to be able to vote,” Blaikie said.

“And that’s why we felt it was very important to try to expand access and have more days upon which Canadians could vote.”

The bill includes a study to expand federal elections to a three-day voting period rather than a single election day.

That falls short of the Liberal-NDP agreement, which promised that the parties would work together to make that a reality.

LeBlanc said the intention was to have elections fall on a Saturday, Sunday and Monday, as well as for people to be able to vote from any polling place in their riding right away.

But Elections Canada “identified some reasonable concerns,” including the challenge of finding “suitable locations” for polling places over a three-day period.


“Elections Canada came to us with some thoughtful operational challenges,” said LeBlanc.

“We think that they need to be mandated by Parliament to come back with a precise timeline of how we can get to that. We thought it was a very reasonable objective.”

The bill also updates the Canada Elections Act to account for new technology, such as artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency.

It clarifies that deepfakes, realistic simulations of public figures such as politicians created with AI technology, are covered under existing offences in the act. Those offences include publishing false statements to affect election results and impersonation.

LeBlanc said the deepfakes “are certainly something that the security services have talked to me about in terms of strengthening our ability to resist foreign interference.”


He said if a foreign state or hostile actor was using “artificial intelligence in a way that is designed to sabotage an electoral process, we think Elections Canada should properly have in the legislation the tools to deal with that.”

The act will also prohibit contributions in the form of crypto-assets, as well as money orders or pre-paid gift cards. The idea is to ban contributions that difficult to trace, the government says.

The bill introduced Wednesday would also include a new prohibition on statements about activities related to the election or voting process if the intent is to disrupt the election. It would apply in cases where the person knows the statement is false or misleading.

The bill also includes new requirements for privacy policies of federal political parties. They will have to put in place “physical, organizational, and technological security safeguards,” the government says.


Political parties will also have to have protocols for notifying individuals if a serious breach takes place, examples that illustrate how they collect and use personal information, and prohibitions against selling personal information, among other rules.

The New Democrats are supporting the minority Liberals on key House of Commons votes in exchange for progress on shared priorities.

The two-year anniversary of the deal, known as a confidence-and-supply agreement, is later this week.

Federal law requires that the next election be held no later than October 2025.

LeBlanc said the intention is for parliamentarians to “ensure that this legislation can be in place as quickly as possible” so updates are ready by then.
What happened to companies/businesses allowing their employees 2 or 3 hours off, with pay, in order to vote. Are they not complying? Why do we need these "extra" days if this is still the law?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,774
11,590
113
Low Earth Orbit
What happened to companies/businesses allowing their employees 2 or 3 hours off, with pay, in order to vote. Are they not complying? Why do we need these "extra" days if this is still the law?
Its already 4 days and mail in. 3 days of advance poles and the main day.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,540
8,262
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Its already 4 days and mail in. 3 days of advance poles and the main day.
It’s tough enough keeping the media quiet so that the people in the west can vote and pretend that they’re making a difference, with the time zones between east and west on a single day…. Let alone a three day span of voting.

Where can they take over schools and gymnasium and halls for three days consecutively without interfering with a whole lot of everything everywhere? Then try to staff with volunteers three consecutive days all day??
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,774
11,590
113
Low Earth Orbit
It’s tough enough keeping the media quiet so that the people in the west can vote and pretend that they’re making a difference, with the time zones between east and west on a single day…. Let alone a three day span of voting.

Where can they take over schools and gymnasium and halls for three days consecutively without interfering with a whole lot of everything everywhere? Then try to staff with volunteers three consecutive days all day??
Its already a 3 day invasion for advance polls and a fouth day 5 days later. NDP wants election WEEK.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,742
7,040
113
B.C.
It’s tough enough keeping the media quiet so that the people in the west can vote and pretend that they’re making a difference, with the time zones between east and west on a single day…. Let alone a three day span of voting.

Where can they take over schools and gymnasium and halls for three days consecutively without interfering with a whole lot of everything everywhere? Then try to staff with volunteers three consecutive days all day??
Most poll workers are paid nowadays.
 
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