The US doesn't take us seriously because we don't take ourselves seriously

Ron in Regina

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With politics being the way they are (east vs west) Pierre will need a miracle to get an east/west pipeline unless he forces it through w/o provincial approval. That I doubt will happen. Hey, maybe he's really good at "negotiating"? Probably not....
Maybe he can unite The East & West with a pipeline across Quebec…in the national interest….& all the labels and signs in Quebec about the pipeline can be in both official languages with French being bigger and on top…assuming that’s still legal after Quebec’s Bill 96 gets hammered through.

Can you imagine the TransCanada Highway or Railroad getting built in today’s political climate?
 
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pgs

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With politics being the way they are (east vs west) Pierre will need a miracle to get an east/west pipeline unless he forces it through w/o provincial approval. That I doubt will happen. Hey, maybe he's really good at "negotiating"? Probably not....
Lots of hands out between Alberta and Nova Scotia .
 

Dixie Cup

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But it creeps into being a national issue on a regular basis…. And I’m thinking specifically of PM Trudeau & The entire Admiral Mark Norman issue….so thank God men like Mark Norman had integrity & Canada’s best interests at heart ‘cuz Trudeau only had Irving’s interests in mind.
I do not doubt for one minute that there was government interference in Norman's case. Trudeau is the most vindictive PM we have ever had and rather than apologize, he doubles down because he will NEVER admit that he's wrong about anything even tho' he's wrong about most things. He's an ignorant ass & I can't even stand listening to him speak.
 

pgs

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Maybe he can unite The East & West with a pipeline across Quebec…in the national interest….& all the labels and signs in Quebec about the pipeline can be in both official languages with French being bigger and on top…assuming that’s still legal after Quebec’s Bill 96 gets hammered through.

Can you imagine the TransCanada Highway or Railroad getting built in today’s political climate?
How about the Alaska Highway ?
 

pgs

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I do not doubt for one minute that there was government interference in Norman's case. Trudeau is the most vindictive PM we have ever had and rather than apologize, he doubles down because he will NEVER admit that he's wrong about anything even tho' he's wrong about most things. He's an ignorant ass & I can't even stand listening to him speak.
Tell us how you really feel .
 

Dixie Cup

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Maybe he can unite The East & West with a pipeline across Quebec…in the national interest….& all the labels and signs in Quebec about the pipeline can be in both official languages with French being bigger and on top…assuming that’s still legal after Quebec’s Bill 96 gets hammered through.

Can you imagine the TransCanada Highway or Railroad getting built in today’s political climate?
They would never have been built! They will ruin the environment don't 'cha know?
 
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Ron in Regina

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They would never have been built! They will ruin the environment don't 'cha know?
They would’a been built…maybe…but with tolls for non-Quebecers at their provincial borders….unless it was overridden in the national interest. Irving’s pockets can go into French ad’s in Quebec promoting Canadian oil in Canada to be patriotic & to keep the Equalization Dollars flowing like the Dire Straights song. Go Team Canada!
 
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pgs

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They would’a been built…maybe…but with tolls for non-Quebecers at their provincial borders….unless it was overridden in the national interest. Irving’s pockets can go into French ad’s in Quebec promoting Canadian oil in Canada to be patriotic & to keep the Equalization Dollars flowing like the Dire Straights song. Go Team Canada!
Clean radio edition , lol , wasn that complaint from NB ?
 

petros

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Can you imagine the TransCanada Highway or Railroad getting built in today’s political climate?
TransCanada isn't finished. There has been construction on the highway my entire life. A hefty percentage is still a two lane 1930s wagon trail. It's insanity. There should be 100km built a year not 100km in 2 goddam decades. It's pathetic. A proper highway through Ontario is still a dream brought up every election to gain votes in shitholes like Dryden, Wawa and Thunder Bay

I can only imagine the nightmares when twinning through the national parks in AB and BC. I can see years being gobbled up to protect a species of flea unique to a localized herd of mountain goat in Rogers Pass. Same goes for special leeches in the godforsaken N ON muskeg.

Maybe it'll be done in 2067 for the 100th anniversary of the highway and Canadian Bicentennial?
 

Tecumsehsbones

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The 1982 amendments to the Constitution Act, 1867 explicitly recognized provinces' and territories' constitutional rights to manage their own non-renewable natural resources, forestry resources, and electrical energy. This includes the power to levy mining taxes and royalties.

Former British Columbia premier Christy Clark says Canada’s natural gas industry is losing ground internationally because of government over-regulation, while Australia makes more gains in the Pacific market.

Speaking as part of a panel on North American energy security at the Canada Gas and LNG conference Thursday, Clark said regulation certainty and simplicity is needed with less overreach from the federal government.

Clark, who is now an adviser at the law firm Bennett Jones, said the United States has eclipsed the Canadian gas sector and it would like to make sure that it remains at a disadvantage.
View attachment 13742
She said Canada can’t play a role in trading its natural resources when it doesn’t have pipelines to Southeast Asia.

Clark, as the B.C. Liberal leader, came from behind to win the 2013 provincial election with promises of a debt-free B.C., based on a liquefied natural gas windfall that could wipe out provincial debt and create thousands of jobs.

She told the group at the Vancouver Convention Centre that the world is going to need natural gas for the foreseeable future and Canada can fulfill that demand.

Canada also has a better relationship with Indigenous people compared with Australia, which gives this country a business advantage, Clark said.

“(The) Australian government is a lot less committed to reconciliation,” she said.
Thank you for a factual, on-point reply to a simple question.

Rare, that.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Maybe he can unite The East & West with a pipeline across Quebec…in the national interest….& all the labels and signs in Quebec about the pipeline can be in both official languages with French being bigger and on top…assuming that’s still legal after Quebec’s Bill 96 gets hammered through.

Can you imagine the TransCanada Highway or Railroad getting built in today’s political climate?

In 2017, the company cancelled the Energy East Pipeline project that would have taken oil from Alberta and Saskatchewan to ports and refineries in New Brunswick. It was seen as a way to get Canadian oil to replace the Saudi oil imported to Eastern Canada and also given producers another export route that wasn’t reliant on the United States.

The company killed Energy East over conditions imposed by the Trudeau government requiring the company to account for upstream and downstream greenhouse gas emissions – meaning emissions created when the product was taken out of the ground and also all emissions when the final product was used.

The National Energy Board had never imposed such conditions and wasn’t imposing them on other projects that the Trudeau Liberals favoured at the time, such as Energie Saguenay. The project was also being denounced by Quebec politicians, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau adopted the language of “social licence.”

The Trudeau government also cancelled the Northern Gateway Pipeline project in 2016, a year after taking office, and have delayed or put up roadblocks to more than a dozen proposals for liquified natural gas export terminals on both the east and west coasts.

It’s a very good link with lots of interesting stuff in it above….
 
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petros

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It's not just Trudeau. The US cancelled 4;gas pipelines to EU. One from ME and two from Morocco and NordStream 2

WTF is going on?
 

Dixie Cup

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TransCanada isn't finished. There has been construction on the highway my entire life. A hefty percentage is still a two lane 1930s wagon trail. It's insanity. There should be 100km built a year not 100km in 2 goddam decades. It's pathetic. A proper highway through Ontario is still a dream brought up every election to gain votes in shitholes like Dryden, Wawa and Thunder Bay

I can only imagine the nightmares when twinning through the national parks in AB and BC. I can see years being gobbled up to protect a species of flea unique to a localized herd of mountain goat in Rogers Pass. Same goes for special leeches in the godforsaken N ON muskeg.

Maybe it'll be done in 2067 for the 100th anniversary of the highway and Canadian Bicentennial?
I still doubt it would happen.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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Here’s something different. Digital Taxation.
While the OECD has agreed on a common approach to tax digital companies, no treaty has been implemented yet to enforce it. Consequently, Canada has proposed to enact its own digital service tax. The plan has met opposition from the United States Trade Representative's office.

(The OECD is The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development)
1691327106441.jpeg

Anyway, that’s some background on the players involved. Digital goods are software programs, music, videos or other electronic files that users download exclusively from the Internet. Some digital goods are free, others are available for a fee. The taxation of digital goods and/or services, sometimes referred to as digital tax and/or a digital services tax, is gaining popularity across the globe.

The digital economy makes up 15.5% of global GDP in 2021 and has grown two and a half times faster than global GDP over the past 15 years, according to the World Bank. Many of the largest digital goods and services companies are multinational, often headquartered in the United States and operating internationally.

The United States could target digital trade if it decides on retaliatory measures against a proposed Canadian digital services tax, U.S. ambassador to Canada David Cohen said.

The Liberal government confirmed this week (mid-July 2023) it plans to go ahead with the tax targeting Big Tech in 2024, despite 138 other countries and jurisdictions agreeing last week to delay similar measures.

In an interview with the National Post’s John Ivison, Cohen pointed out United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai has previously warned Canada should not implement a unilateral tax.

Cohen said Tai’s “statement was direct and clear and strong that if Canada decides to proceed alone, you leave the United States with no choice but to take retaliatory measures in the trade context, potentially in the digital trade context, in order to respond to that.”

The Canadian tax, estimated to bring in $3.4 billion over five years, is aimed at large companies that operate online marketplaces, social media platforms and earn revenue from online advertising. This includes Amazon, Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb. The Liberal government first promised the tax in the 2021 budget. It would be retroactive to 2022, meaning the companies would be on the hook for more than $1 billion once it comes into effect.

(This has a Targeted Bill C-18 Feel but is something new and different)

Canada has said its DST would only come into effect if a multilateral tax agreed to by OECD countries isn’t in place by 2024. The OECD approach would implement a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15 per cent.


But last week, OECD countries agreed to delay any plans for their own unilateral taxes by another year. Only Canada, Belarus, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka — of 143 countries party to the deal — weren’t supportive of the one-year delay, according to Reuters.
1691328393651.jpeg
Then above, Article 19.4….& please excuse the disjointed way I’m putting this together early on a Sunday morning….

Canadian Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland on Wednesday said the agreement to freeze pillar one implementation by another year put Canada at a disadvantage relative to countries that have been collecting revenue under their pre-existing digital services taxes.

Colvin said Washington could retaliate under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement if Canada went ahead and implemented the new tax.

The U.S. government has repeatedly objected to the planned Canadian tax, including through a written statement last year, and as recently as last week (again, this is from mid-July 2023) when U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai raised the issue during a meeting with Canadian Trade Minister Mary Ng.

More than 140 countries were supposed to start implementing next year a 2021 deal overhauling decades-old rules on how governments tax multinationals that are widely considered to be outdated as digital giants like Apple or Amazon can book profits in low-tax countries.

Because the process has dragged on, the more than 30 governments that have or plan national digital services taxes had agreed to put them on ice until the end of this year, or drop them altogether once the first pillar of the tax deal takes shape.

Amid concerns among some countries, the plan now calls for governments to sign off before the end of the year with a goal of having the treaty enter force in 2025, instead of in 2024 as previously planned.

Out of the 143 countries that are party to the deal, only five countries - Belarus, Canada, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka - were not in a position at the meeting to offer their support, an OECD official said. (Interesting Bedfellows)

Is Canada right is jumping the gun that most of these other 140+ countries aren’t doing (?) or are Canada and these four other (strange company) countries ahead of the curve???
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Here’s something different. Digital Taxation.
While the OECD has agreed on a common approach to tax digital companies, no treaty has been implemented yet to enforce it. Consequently, Canada has proposed to enact its own digital service tax. The plan has met opposition from the United States Trade Representative's office.

(The OECD is The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development)
View attachment 18904

Anyway, that’s some background on the players involved. Digital goods are software programs, music, videos or other electronic files that users download exclusively from the Internet. Some digital goods are free, others are available for a fee. The taxation of digital goods and/or services, sometimes referred to as digital tax and/or a digital services tax, is gaining popularity across the globe.

The digital economy makes up 15.5% of global GDP in 2021 and has grown two and a half times faster than global GDP over the past 15 years, according to the World Bank. Many of the largest digital goods and services companies are multinational, often headquartered in the United States and operating internationally.

The United States could target digital trade if it decides on retaliatory measures against a proposed Canadian digital services tax, U.S. ambassador to Canada David Cohen said.

The Liberal government confirmed this week (mid-July 2023) it plans to go ahead with the tax targeting Big Tech in 2024, despite 138 other countries and jurisdictions agreeing last week to delay similar measures.

In an interview with the National Post’s John Ivison, Cohen pointed out United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai has previously warned Canada should not implement a unilateral tax.

Cohen said Tai’s “statement was direct and clear and strong that if Canada decides to proceed alone, you leave the United States with no choice but to take retaliatory measures in the trade context, potentially in the digital trade context, in order to respond to that.”

The Canadian tax, estimated to bring in $3.4 billion over five years, is aimed at large companies that operate online marketplaces, social media platforms and earn revenue from online advertising. This includes Amazon, Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb. The Liberal government first promised the tax in the 2021 budget. It would be retroactive to 2022, meaning the companies would be on the hook for more than $1 billion once it comes into effect.

(This has a Targeted Bill C-18 Feel but is something new and different)

Canada has said its DST would only come into effect if a multilateral tax agreed to by OECD countries isn’t in place by 2024. The OECD approach would implement a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15 per cent.


But last week, OECD countries agreed to delay any plans for their own unilateral taxes by another year. Only Canada, Belarus, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka — of 143 countries party to the deal — weren’t supportive of the one-year delay, according to Reuters.
View attachment 18905
Then above, Article 19.4….& please excuse the disjointed way I’m putting this together early on a Sunday morning….

Canadian Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland on Wednesday said the agreement to freeze pillar one implementation by another year put Canada at a disadvantage relative to countries that have been collecting revenue under their pre-existing digital services taxes.

Colvin said Washington could retaliate under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement if Canada went ahead and implemented the new tax.

The U.S. government has repeatedly objected to the planned Canadian tax, including through a written statement last year, and as recently as last week (again, this is from mid-July 2023) when U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai raised the issue during a meeting with Canadian Trade Minister Mary Ng.

More than 140 countries were supposed to start implementing next year a 2021 deal overhauling decades-old rules on how governments tax multinationals that are widely considered to be outdated as digital giants like Apple or Amazon can book profits in low-tax countries.

Because the process has dragged on, the more than 30 governments that have or plan national digital services taxes had agreed to put them on ice until the end of this year, or drop them altogether once the first pillar of the tax deal takes shape.

Amid concerns among some countries, the plan now calls for governments to sign off before the end of the year with a goal of having the treaty enter force in 2025, instead of in 2024 as previously planned.

Out of the 143 countries that are party to the deal, only five countries - Belarus, Canada, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka - were not in a position at the meeting to offer their support, an OECD official said. (Interesting Bedfellows)

Is Canada right is jumping the gun that most of these other 140+ countries aren’t doing (?) or are Canada and these four other (strange company) countries ahead of the curve???
If it moves tax it . The liberal way .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,172
8,025
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Here’s something different. Digital Taxation.
While the OECD has agreed on a common approach to tax digital companies, no treaty has been implemented yet to enforce it. Consequently, Canada has proposed to enact its own digital service tax. The plan has met opposition from the United States Trade Representative's office.

(The OECD is The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development)
View attachment 18904

Anyway, that’s some background on the players involved. Digital goods are software programs, music, videos or other electronic files that users download exclusively from the Internet. Some digital goods are free, others are available for a fee. The taxation of digital goods and/or services, sometimes referred to as digital tax and/or a digital services tax, is gaining popularity across the globe.

The digital economy makes up 15.5% of global GDP in 2021 and has grown two and a half times faster than global GDP over the past 15 years, according to the World Bank. Many of the largest digital goods and services companies are multinational, often headquartered in the United States and operating internationally.

The United States could target digital trade if it decides on retaliatory measures against a proposed Canadian digital services tax, U.S. ambassador to Canada David Cohen said.

The Liberal government confirmed this week (mid-July 2023) it plans to go ahead with the tax targeting Big Tech in 2024, despite 138 other countries and jurisdictions agreeing last week to delay similar measures.

In an interview with the National Post’s John Ivison, Cohen pointed out United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai has previously warned Canada should not implement a unilateral tax.

Cohen said Tai’s “statement was direct and clear and strong that if Canada decides to proceed alone, you leave the United States with no choice but to take retaliatory measures in the trade context, potentially in the digital trade context, in order to respond to that.”

The Canadian tax, estimated to bring in $3.4 billion over five years, is aimed at large companies that operate online marketplaces, social media platforms and earn revenue from online advertising. This includes Amazon, Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb. The Liberal government first promised the tax in the 2021 budget. It would be retroactive to 2022, meaning the companies would be on the hook for more than $1 billion once it comes into effect.

(This has a Targeted Bill C-18 Feel but is something new and different)

Canada has said its DST would only come into effect if a multilateral tax agreed to by OECD countries isn’t in place by 2024. The OECD approach would implement a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15 per cent.


But last week, OECD countries agreed to delay any plans for their own unilateral taxes by another year. Only Canada, Belarus, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka — of 143 countries party to the deal — weren’t supportive of the one-year delay, according to Reuters.
View attachment 18905
Then above, Article 19.4….& please excuse the disjointed way I’m putting this together early on a Sunday morning….

Canadian Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland on Wednesday said the agreement to freeze pillar one implementation by another year put Canada at a disadvantage relative to countries that have been collecting revenue under their pre-existing digital services taxes.

Colvin said Washington could retaliate under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement if Canada went ahead and implemented the new tax.

The U.S. government has repeatedly objected to the planned Canadian tax, including through a written statement last year, and as recently as last week (again, this is from mid-July 2023) when U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai raised the issue during a meeting with Canadian Trade Minister Mary Ng.

More than 140 countries were supposed to start implementing next year a 2021 deal overhauling decades-old rules on how governments tax multinationals that are widely considered to be outdated as digital giants like Apple or Amazon can book profits in low-tax countries.

Because the process has dragged on, the more than 30 governments that have or plan national digital services taxes had agreed to put them on ice until the end of this year, or drop them altogether once the first pillar of the tax deal takes shape.

Amid concerns among some countries, the plan now calls for governments to sign off before the end of the year with a goal of having the treaty enter force in 2025, instead of in 2024 as previously planned.

Out of the 143 countries that are party to the deal, only five countries - Belarus, Canada, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka - were not in a position at the meeting to offer their support, an OECD official said. (Interesting Bedfellows)

Is Canada right is jumping the gun that most of these other 140+ countries aren’t doing (?) or are Canada and these four other (strange company) countries ahead of the curve???
If it moves tax it . The liberal way .
…& on that note…The Liberal government said that it agreed to delay implementing its DST to give time for an international treaty between members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to settle how the tax will be structured.

"We can act unilaterally," Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Tuesday. "We have also always said if [the treaty] did not come into force at the end of this year, then Canada would have no choice but to introduce our own [digital services tax]."

Another affordability tax at this point? Makes sense. Who will pay this tax? Netflix? Google? Facebook? Or Canadians that use these services?
Finance officials speaking on background explained that while the ways and means motion introduced in the House of Commons outlining the DST — and other measures from the fall economic statement and budget — does not contain an implementation date, cabinet can set a date when it sees fit, providing the legislation is in place.
1701631211180.jpeg
"It's really a matter of fairness," Freeland said. "There are other countries, our partners, who are today collecting DST. That DST is helping make essential investments in their countries, and it's just not fair for Canadians to be deprived of also further being taxed for that revenue."
The Canadian tax, estimated to bring in $3.4 billion over five years, is aimed at large companies that operate online marketplaces, social media platforms and earn revenue from online advertising. This includes Amazon, Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb.
I’m assuming Door-Dash is a digital service. Can’t forget another tax for food delivery on top of the “at every level” carbon taxes.
Canada has said its DST would only come into effect if a multilateral tax agreed to by OECD countries isn’t in place by 2024. The OECD approach would implement a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15 per cent.
…& that’s apparently out the window.
1701632708815.jpeg
But last week, OECD countries agreed to delay any plans for their own unilateral taxes by another year. Only Canada, Belarus, Pakistan, Russia and Sri Lanka — of 143 countries party to the deal — weren’t supportive of the one-year delay, according to Reuters.
Well, at least Canada is in good company.
Colvin said Washington could retaliate under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement if Canada went ahead and implemented the new tax.
Meh…retaliation for further taxation now will just be another gift for Canadians and a future Canadian Federal government. Not a huge concern for the Liberal/NPD’ers at this point I guess.
1701633528441.jpeg
So, aside from another tax grab that the Liberals can’t afford to wait for until 2025 like the other 174 or whatever OECD countries…is this another poison pill being planted for the next incoming federal government and Canadian taxpayers?
1701633737970.jpeg
 

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Dixie Cup

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…& on that note…The Liberal government said that it agreed to delay implementing its DST to give time for an international treaty between members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to settle how the tax will be structured.

"We can act unilaterally," Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Tuesday. "We have also always said if [the treaty] did not come into force at the end of this year, then Canada would have no choice but to introduce our own [digital services tax]."

Another affordability tax at this point? Makes sense. Who will pay this tax? Netflix? Google? Facebook? Or Canadians that use these services?
Finance officials speaking on background explained that while the ways and means motion introduced in the House of Commons outlining the DST — and other measures from the fall economic statement and budget — does not contain an implementation date, cabinet can set a date when it sees fit, providing the legislation is in place.
View attachment 20241
"It's really a matter of fairness," Freeland said. "There are other countries, our partners, who are today collecting DST. That DST is helping make essential investments in their countries, and it's just not fair for Canadians to be deprived of also further being taxed for that revenue."

I’m assuming Door-Dash is a digital service. Can’t forget another tax for food delivery on top of the “at every level” carbon taxes.

…& that’s apparently out the window.
View attachment 20244

Well, at least Canada is in good company.

Meh…retaliation for further taxation now will just be another gift for Canadians and a future Canadian Federal government. Not a huge concern for the Liberal/NPD’ers at this point I guess.
View attachment 20245
So, aside from another tax grab that the Liberals can’t afford to wait for until 2025 like the other 174 or whatever OECD countries…is this another poison pill being planted for the next incoming federal government and Canadian taxpayers?
View attachment 20246
The feds need the money due to their over spending so of course they'll tax anything that moves. I'm surprised that food isn't taxed - oh wait, that's likely coming down the line as more funds are spent irrationally. God help us all!
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
In the aftermath of the renegotiation of the former North American Free Trade Agreement, which saw changes to supply-managed sectors, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised (predominantly Quebec) dairy farmers that no more slices of Canada's domestic market would be served up to exporters in future negotiations.
1706274756886.jpeg
A major sticking point between the two sides remains how much tariff-free access U.K. producers should have to the Canadian cheese market.

(Predominantly Quebec) Dairy farmers want to keep their supply-managed and heavily protected sector out of this deal.

Maybe the Liberals should see if the UK needs Canadian Government Sponsored Heat Pumps? It doesn’t get too cold there.

"We have always said we will only negotiate trade deals that deliver for the British people. And we reserve the right to pause negotiations with any country if progress is not being made," a U.K. government spokesperson said in a statement to CBC News.

Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay told reporters Canada wouldn't agree to a deal that wasn't good for Canadian farmers.

"Supply management is not on the table," he said, adding that the ministers would rather officials be talking at the negotiating table about these issues instead of talking to the media.
The United Kingdom is Canada's third-largest trading partner, worth over $46 billion in two-way goods and services trade in 2022.