Saskatchewan Nuclear and Nuclear Accesories

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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I tell you what!

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With Cameco recently buying 49% of Westinghouse and Provincial Conservatives fighting alleged climate with research funding into micro reactors for power or heat who needs whirlygigs, methane farting hydro reservoirs and heat pumps?

Cameco and Brookfield Complete Acquisition of Westinghouse Electric Company​

Cameco and Brookfield Complete Acquisition of Westinghouse Electric Company Creating a Powerful Platform for Strategic Growth

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, November 7, 2023
All amounts in Canadian dollars unless specified otherwise
Cameco (TSX: CCO; NYSE: CCJ) announced that the acquisition of Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) in a strategic partnership with Brookfield Asset Management alongside its publicly listed affiliate Brookfield Renewable Partners (Brookfield) and institutional partners closed today.
Cameco now owns a 49% interest and Brookfield owns the remaining 51% in Westinghouse, one of the world’s largest nuclear services businesses.

“This is a historic day for Cameco as we join Brookfield to complete our purchase of Westinghouse,” said Tim Gitzel, president and CEO of Cameco. “Since first announcing this deal a year ago, we believe the business prospects for Westinghouse have significantly improved. The sustained and positive momentum for nuclear energy has been undeniable as countries and companies around the world strive to meet their net-zero commitments and growing energy needs through clean and secure supply.

“Cameco’s 35 years of experience in uranium mining and nuclear fuel production combined with Brookfield’s expertise in clean energy is expected to provide a solid foundation for Westinghouse’s continued success in the provision of nuclear plant technologies, products and services, and to create a powerful platform for strategic growth across the nuclear sector. The partners, together with Westinghouse, are well-positioned to provide global solutions for the increasing need for secure, reliable and emissions-free baseload power




Nuclear microreactor to come online in Sask. by 2029​

Regina / 980 CJME
CJME News
Nov 27, 2023 | 10:05 AM
Nuclear microreactor to come online in Sask. by 2029

Saskatchewan's first microreactor is expected to be operational by 2029, and will be used in an industrial application to lay the groundwork for more projects further down the road. (Shane Clausing/650 CKOM)

Saskatchewan is investing heavily in a nuclear-powered future for the province.

On Monday, Premier Scott Moe announced an investment of $80 million for the Saskatchewan Research Council to demonstrate microreactor technology in the province. The research council will then apply the knowledge gained after licensing and deploying an initial microreactor to support the province’s nuclear development and better understand the technology’s potential.

“This project has the opportunity to be transformative for our economy, industry and communities,” Moe said in a statement. “Microreactors provide a custom solution for Saskatchewan’s unique energy needs.”
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The provincial government said the microreactor will be built by Westinghouse Electric Company, which was purchased in part by Saskatoon-based Cameco last year.
According to Westinghouse’s website, its eVinci reactor, the type which will be tested in Saskatchewan, can power “more than 3,000 homes.”

Mike Crabtree, the president and CEO of the Saskatchewan Research Council, said the first reactor is expected to be operational by 2029, and will be used in an industrial application to lay the groundwork for more projects further down the road.

“What we learn through this project will prepare SRC to assist communities and industries in future projects,” Crabtree said in a statement.
Crabtree explained what the future could hold for this type of technology.

“There have been microreactors since the ‘50s and ‘60s, but largely for military applications. This is the next generation – the ability to use safe, clean, reliable reactors for commercial and community use,” he said.


An eVinci microreactor, made by Westinghouse, is expected to be operational in Saskatchewan by 2029. (Saskatchewan Research Council/Submitted)

“These microreactors are going to be used in in combination with renewable technology. One of the challenges with wind and solar is having that base load that allows you to get that consistent power. It gives you an opportunity to be able to use a much broader green grid.”
The location for the reactor has not yet been decided, the province noted, as it depends on licensing and regulatory requirements. The small size of microreactors mean the infrastructure around the five-megawatt reactor will be “less than two-thirds the size of a hockey rink.”

Each reactor built is expected to run for eight to 10 years when used at full power, and they can be taken back to the factory to be repaired and refurbished so they can be reused, Crabtree added.

Moe said the new investment will bring real benefits to smaller communities around the province.

“There’s going to be renewables and there’s going to be nuclear power. What we’re going to see globally – and this will be discussed at COP28 – is the doubling or tripling of nuclear power that we have today in the world, and that’s going to involve large reactors and the microreactors for rural and remote communities,” the premier explained.

“You can think of northern and rural areas of Canada where you can utilize this technology. The opportunities for technologies like this to come on stream, I think, are great.”
Patrick Fragman, the president and CEO of Westinghouse Electric Company, said the company’s fully transportable technology is “the perfect fit” for the province.

“It also provides carbon-free electricity and heat, uses no water, and can be completely removed from site after operating continuously for eight years or more,” Fragman added in a statement.

Last week, Saskatchewan announced a new partnership between SaskPower and Ontario Power Generation to help advance the two provinces’ nuclear power goals through the development of small, modular reactors.

The federal government also contributed $74 million to SaskPower’s reactor development project earlier this year, though the amount came under criticism from provincial officials, who said it was too low.

Ottawa’s proposed clean electricity regulations have also come under recent criticism from the provincial government.
— With files from Shane Clausing.
— Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to correct an error regarding the federal government’s contribution to SaskPower.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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This is amazing technology and not far into the future. These puppies means no need overspend on upgrading the grid. They could run a substation on their own while heating a town.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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Yep a cost effective way to supply stable electricity for industrial spiking and rural communities
Zero emissions to cook potash and fertilizer or refine oil. Then there are the massive greenhouses. No more trucks with veg from Mexico and Bakersfield. Dry highways and streets year round. Central communuty heating and on and on.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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Hahaha you gotta be carbon free by 2035 but you can't use federal taxpayer money to get there, what a farce
$74 Million from the Feds? Thats a vegan fart in the wind....
…& at COP28 deciding the fate of Canada, & more specifically it’s only two landlocked provinces by coincidence I guess. The federal government says Canada's promised oil and gas emissions cap framework could drop any day.

Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault — now in Dubai for the 2023 United Nations Climate Change Conference, better known as COP28 — said Friday he would be "shocked if this framework wasn't presented at the end of this conference."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau confirmed the Liberal government's plan to impose a lid on emissions from the oil and gas sector at a previous COP summit in 2021.
1701629493178.jpeg
On Friday, Guilbeault said recent “legal setbacks” were among the reasons the government is taking more time to develop the framework.

"The Supreme Court decision on impact assessment and the federal court ruling on plastics… has meant that we have to now make sure that it tackles pollution without infringing on provincial jurisdiction," he said.

Pathways Alliance, which represents the six largest oilsands companies, has said it does not oppose a cap on sectoral emissions.

The question, said the organization, is whether the cap will be too restrictive and limit the ability of industry to grow its production.

"We support the federal government's efforts to make significant emissions reductions by 2030, and its goal of net zero by 2050," said Mark Cameron, Pathway's vice-president of external relations. "However, getting there requires a practical and realistic approach to emissions reduction to protect jobs and investment and help provide global energy security."

The federal government's Emissions Reduction Plan calls on the oil and gas sector to cut its emissions by 42 per cent below 2019 levels by 2030.

Pathways Alliance said that target is not achievable in that time and, if applied to the oilsands, would amount to an emissions cut of about 35 megatonnes without accounting for production growth.

Before landing in Dubai, Guilbeault hinted that Canada might release strengthened methane regulations at COP28, because COP28.

Federal Energy Minister Jonathan Wilkinson is working alongside Guilbeault to develop the oil and gas cap framework and the regulations.

Last month, he said any cap Ottawa proposes would be "informed by logic" and would allow Canada to compete with other oil-producing countries.

Canada is the fourth-largest oil producer globally and the fifth-largest natural gas producer.

"We want to make sure that we do this in a thoughtful way that's rigorous, that's informed by logic and that pushes for as many (emissions) reductions as we can see in the sector as possible, without shutting in production that's not linked to global declines in demand," Wilkinson said at a recent net-zero conference.

"Because that would essentially make us poorer in Canada and make our American friends or folks in Saudi Arabia or elsewhere richer."

Guilbeault said the pending framework would offer a "plain language" version of its climate policy before the government commits to draft regulations. The government also has said it could impose a higher carbon price on oil and gas producers to ensure emissions align with the cap. Will there be a Newfoundland specific exemption because Newfoundland? Only time will tell.
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Taxslave2

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This is amazing technology and not far into the future. These puppies means no need overspend on upgrading the grid. They could run a substation on their own while heating a town.
Put them in cities, and there would be no need for most of the grid. That also has the added benefit of them spewing their poison where most of the oil spitters live.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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COP28-ish stuff, CBC version. The federal government is unveiling stricter oil and gas industry regulations with the goal of sharply reducing harmful methane emissions.

The new rules were announced by federal Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault at the COP28 climate summit in Dubai, U.A.E., on Monday.
 
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Twin_Moose

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COP28-ish stuff, CBC version. The federal government is unveiling stricter oil and gas industry regulations with the goal of sharply reducing harmful methane emissions.

The new rules were announced by federal Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault at the COP28 climate summit in Dubai, U.A.E., on Monday.
Nothing like supporting the new not producing LNG terminal projects across the country
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
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Hot digitty!

Cha-Ching! Have you ever hit 777777 on a 15 line $1 slot?

Uranium

China uranium grab poses threat to western energy supply, warns Yellow
Cake

Uranium has been one of the best-performing commodities of the year, climbing 70% to trade at $81 per pound © Bloomberg
Harry Dempsey in London DECEMBER 9 2023

Roula Khalaf, Editor of the FT, selects her favourite stories in this weekly newsletter.
China is making an aggressive push to tie up global uranium supply amid a worldwide rush to secure nuclear fuel, warned the boss of Yellow Cake, a London-listed investment vehicle for the radioactive commodity.

André Liebenberg, chief executive of the Aim-traded company, said the west was lagging behind in securing uranium after prices hit a 15-year high and as Chinese firms purchase supplies on the open market, sign long-term contracts and buy up mines.

“Any mineral they need, they will look to tie up,” he said. “Chinese efforts to secure supply will certainly create competition for resources, and given resource opportunities are limited, they will challenge western utilities’ ability to source supply.”

Uranium has been one of the best-performing commodities of the year, climbing 70 per cent to trade at $81 per pound, its highest since 2007.
The blistering rally has been supported by governments supporting nuclear energy — a constant and low-carbon power source — by extending the lifetime of plants and considering building new reactors in the wake of gas prices skyrocketing last year.

At the UN’s recent COP28 climate conference in Dubai, 22 world leaders declared a commitment to treble nuclear capacity globally by 2050 compared with 2020 levels, further adding positive sentiment to an already boisterous market.

The price rise for the raw material has lifted Yellow Cake, which was founded in 2018 to give investors a way to gain exposure to an anticipated bull run for uranium. Liebenberg said there was a “decent chance” of the price breaking through $100 per pound next year.

After a decade of under-investment in new production and years of a supply glut following the global pullback in atomic power after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, uranium prices have returned to strength.

Yellow Cake has a 10-year supply agreement with Kazatomprom, the world’s largest producer of uranium, to buy $100mn of the mineral each year from the Kazakh company, which Yellow Cake then holds in storage facilities in Canada and France. At present, Yellow Cake holds the equivalent to almost 20 per cent of annual global supply.

Reflecting the surge in uranium prices, shares in Yellow Cake have rallied 54 per cent this year, taking its market capitalisation to £1.3bn. Last week the company said its net asset value had jumped from $1bn in March to $1.8bn as of early December.

To cash in, the company would either need to sell its holdings of uranium at higher prices than those at which it bought them or be taken over by a utility in need of supply.

China, the world’s second-largest producer of nuclear power, accounts for almost half the reactors under construction globally.

“The Chinese are running around looking for new supply,” Liebenberg said. “If they want to meet their nuclear plans by the end of the decade, then they will need new pounds.”

Beijing has set a goal of self-sufficiency in nuclear fuel through its goal of producing a third of its uranium needs domestically, obtaining another third via investment in foreign mines, and buying the remainder on the market.

China National Uranium Corporation and a subsidiary of CGN — China General Nuclear Power Group — have already taken equity in mines across Niger, Namibia and Kazakhstan, while CNUC is constructing a warehouse in Xinjiang next to the Kazakh border that aims to serve as a major uranium trading hub.
The drive by China to snap up supply adds to the headache that the west faces from relying on Russia, which controls almost 50 per cent of global uranium-enrichment capacity.

Liebenberg said that if Russia were to cut nuclear fuel supplies to the west, then utilities would face disruption in the five years that it would take to build a supply chain independent of Moscow.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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Hot digitty!

Cha-Ching! Have you ever hit 777777 on a 15 line $1 slot?
Nope, but my odometer was stuck on 777777 for the longest time, and might still be because I don’t look at it because it was stuck on 777777. 😳
Uranium

China uranium grab poses threat to western energy supply, warns Yellow
Cake

Uranium has been one of the best-performing commodities of the year, climbing 70% to trade at $81 per pound © Bloomberg
Harry Dempsey in London DECEMBER 9 2023
Wish we had a safe, reliable, local source of that Uranium in North America that we could rely upon. I think we only have five of them currently in Saskatchewan, and I had family living in Uranium City for a few years in the early 70s before that was abandoned.
Roula Khalaf, Editor of the FT, selects her favourite stories in this weekly newsletter.
China is making an aggressive push to tie up global uranium supply amid a worldwide rush to secure nuclear fuel, warned the boss of Yellow Cake, a London-listed investment vehicle for the radioactive commodity.
André Liebenberg, chief executive of the Aim-traded company, said the west was lagging behind in securing uranium after prices hit a 15-year high and as Chinese firms purchase supplies on the open market, sign long-term contracts and buy up mines.
Interesting. I’m so tempted to bring in the whole Trudeau NDP/Liberal speculation but unless this is screwed up in regulatory bureaucracy make it impossible to mine, we are in good shape I’m assuming…
“Any mineral they need, they will look to tie up,” he said. “Chinese efforts to secure supply will certainly create competition for resources, and given resource opportunities are limited, they will challenge western utilities’ ability to source supply.”

Uranium has been one of the best-performing commodities of the year, climbing 70 per cent to trade at $81 per pound, its highest since 2007.
The blistering rally has been supported by governments supporting nuclear energy — a constant and low-carbon power source — by extending the lifetime of plants and considering building new reactors in the wake of gas prices skyrocketing last year.

At the UN’s recent COP28 climate conference in Dubai, 22 world leaders declared a commitment to treble nuclear capacity globally by 2050 compared with 2020 levels, further adding positive sentiment to an already boisterous market.

The price rise for the raw material has lifted Yellow Cake, which was founded in 2018 to give investors a way to gain exposure to an anticipated bull run for uranium. Liebenberg said there was a “decent chance” of the price breaking through $100 per pound next year.

After a decade of under-investment in new production and years of a supply glut following the global pullback in atomic power after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, uranium prices have returned to strength.

Yellow Cake has a 10-year supply agreement with Kazatomprom, the world’s largest producer of uranium, to buy $100mn of the mineral each year from the Kazakh company, which Yellow Cake then holds in storage facilities in Canada and France. At present, Yellow Cake holds the equivalent to almost 20 per cent of annual global supply.

Reflecting the surge in uranium prices, shares in Yellow Cake have rallied 54 per cent this year, taking its market capitalisation to £1.3bn. Last week the company said its net asset value had jumped from $1bn in March to $1.8bn as of early December.

To cash in, the company would either need to sell its holdings of uranium at higher prices than those at which it bought them or be taken over by a utility in need of supply.

China, the world’s second-largest producer of nuclear power, accounts for almost half the reactors under construction globally.

“The Chinese are running around looking for new supply,” Liebenberg said. “If they want to meet their nuclear plans by the end of the decade, then they will need new pounds.”

Beijing has set a goal of self-sufficiency in nuclear fuel through its goal of producing a third of its uranium needs domestically, obtaining another third via investment in foreign mines, and buying the remainder on the market.

China National Uranium Corporation and a subsidiary of CGN — China General Nuclear Power Group — have already taken equity in mines across Niger, Namibia and Kazakhstan, while CNUC is constructing a warehouse in Xinjiang next to the Kazakh border that aims to serve as a major uranium trading hub.
The drive by China to snap up supply adds to the headache that the west faces from relying on Russia, which controls almost 50 per cent of global uranium-enrichment capacity.

Liebenberg said that if Russia were to cut nuclear fuel supplies to the west, then utilities would face disruption in the five years that it would take to build a supply chain independent of Moscow.
Let’s see where this one goes, & how Canada can miss this boat.
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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I always thought the U.S. nuclear power system should be operated by the Navy. They've been running nuclear-powered ships for 62 years without a single "mishap." I guess there's something about knowing the furthest you can run in a nuclear accident is 1000 feet that focusses the mind on safety.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Nope, but my odometer was stuck on 777777 for the longest time, and might still be because I don’t look at it because it was stuck on 777777. 😳

Wish we had a safe, reliable, local source of that Uranium in North America that we could rely upon. I think we only have five of them currently in Saskatchewan, and I had family living in Uranium City for a few years in the early 70s before that was abandoned.


Interesting. I’m so tempted to bring in the whole Trudeau NDP/Liberal speculation but unless this is screwed up in regulatory bureaucracy make it impossible to mine, we are in good shape I’m assuming…

Let’s see where this one goes, & how Canada can miss this boat.
We are in good shape. Really really really good shape.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Well, luckily railways already exist, uranium doesn’t get shipped in a pipeline, and current mines are already in operation. How can government screw that up? Watch and see. 😉
Here's the thing, if Canadian mining laws were to change by 1° of econaut the global mining industry collapses.

Canada is home to almost half of the world's publicly listed mining and mineral exploration companies 1. Many of these companies have operations in Canada and abroad.Feb 14, 2023

https://natural-resources.canada.ca › ...

Canadian Mining Assets - Canada.ca

 
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Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
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I'm sure the Trudeau government will find some way to screw this up. No doubt in my mind. ESPECIALLY since it's a Western Province & you know how much he hates us right?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,305
11,790
113
Low Earth Orbit
I'm sure the Trudeau government will find some way to screw this up. No doubt in my mind. ESPECIALLY since it's a Western Province & you know how much he hates us right?
Nothing really stands in the way. Canada and Sask have an established system going back a century.
 
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