Ryerson University

Rohan

The Devil
Mar 5, 2006
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16
Melbourne
www.thewackylounge.com
My bro got llow % in his 12 xams....now mom and dad are looking at sending him to toronto.......


Sincxe he got very low marks he cannot get admission ino a degree course......


So what they decided was to apply for pre-university in ryerson


After the 6 months course he would then be able to get into a computer engineering corse........


what do u guys think......

is ryerson a goos university to do engineering if no give some options plsssssss......


its kind of urgent

thanks

rohan
 

Daz_Hockey

Council Member
Nov 21, 2005
1,927
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I heard it was shockingly rubbish, sort of like southampton solent university compared to southampton university over here.....Ryerson is in a bit of a dodgy area as I recall too, tell him to watch his wallet.

often over here we find that too many people are doing degree's over here who are too stupid or lazy to do one, but just wanna waste time, perhaps he should so some sort of apprentice work, plus it's god-expensive over there, why spend it all on someone who clearly isnt bothered?
 

Said1

Hubba Hubba
Apr 18, 2005
5,313
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My nephew goes to Ryerson, he's taking engineering - areospace or something like that. He likes it, no real complaints and he's far from lazy and stupid.
 

Gilgamesh

Council Member
Nov 15, 2014
1,081
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I heard it was shockingly rubbish, sort of like southampton solent university compared to southampton university over here.....Ryerson is in a bit of a dodgy area as I recall too, tell him to watch his wallet.

often over here we find that too many people are doing degree's over here who are too stupid or lazy to do one, but just wanna waste time, perhaps he should so some sort of apprentice work, plus it's god-expensive over there, why spend it all on someone who clearly isnt bothered?
It is a waste of space, and time. IMO the degree is worth less than used toilet paper. The young man would be better off in a trade where he would probably make more money and be more happy,

Mom and Dad, don't let your snobbery ruin a good kids life.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Ryerson School of Journalism leaders step down amid calls to address racism
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Liam Casey
Publishing date:Mar 09, 2021 • 5 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble30 Comments
Ryerson University in downtown Toronto.
Ryerson University in downtown Toronto. PHOTO BY ERNEST DOROSZUK /Toronto Sun
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The heads of the prestigious Ryerson School of Journalism have stepped down amid calls for sweeping changes at the school to address systemic racism and discrimination.

Janice Neil, the chair of the journalism school, and Lisa Taylor, associate chair and the school’s undergraduate program director, resigned on Sunday.

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Both noted in their resignation letters that they had worked to address issues of systemic racism and discrimination at the school during their years as leaders.


On Monday morning, Ryerson journalism students issued a public letter accusing the school of failing to represent and support Black, Indigenous, people of colour and LGBTQ students in the program.

The letter said the school has contributed to an unsafe learning environment rife with discrimination that has left students traumatized.

In an email to The Canadian Press on Monday evening, Neil said that under her leadership, the school had increased diversity of the teaching faculty, introduced new courses about reporting on race, Indigenous issues and the LGBTQ community, and offered mental health supports for students.

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But Neil also acknowledged that many students think change has not come fast enough or is broad enough to make an impact,.

“One of the things I’ve learned as a leader is to recognize when It’s time for a major reset and that time is now,” she wrote. “To get to the next level will require different leadership.”


In her resignation letter, Lisa Taylor explained her reason for stepping down.

“Some students don’t believe that I’m in their corner, which means they may not turn to me if they’re in need, and having an undergraduate program director who is a trusted resource for only some students is truly inequitable,” she wrote.

A spokeswoman for Ryerson said the school “continues to acknowledge the work that needs to be done to address systemic racism” and will continue to take concrete steps to address the students’ concerns.
 
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Mowich

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Opinion: Egerton Ryerson has been falsely accused of trying to erase Indigenous culture


The City of Toronto recently proposed to create 34 neighbourhoods for administrative reasons, labelling one of them as “Ryerson” to capture the downtown area mainly occupied by the University campus that bears his name. The initiative rebooted the demand to remove Ryerson’s statue on Gould Street and to change the name of the university dedicated to his memory.

Egerton Ryerson (1803-1882), the Methodist minister who has long been celebrated as the founder of the Ontario public school system, stands accused of creating a residential school system designed to stamp out Indigenous culture. Nothing could be further from the truth.
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission investigated the issue, but its final report made no such claim. It did not seem to matter: a small but nameless constituency still argues that Ryerson was the predecessor to federal politicians who launched new residential schools in 1883, and should therefore be erased from public memory.

Ryerson is being misjudged. He was not a racist and he did not discriminate against Indigenous people. It was the exact opposite! As a young man he was appointed to the Credit mission, home of the Mississaugas. He learned their language, worked in the fields with the people of the settlement and became a life-long friend of future chief Kahkewaquonaby (Sacred Feathers), known in English as Peter Jones.

In fact, it was in recognition of his services to the Mississauga, that Ryerson was adopted and given the name of a recently deceased chief, “Cheechock” or “Chechalk.”

After he left the Credit mission, Ryerson kept in touch with Peter Jones. In the 1830s he assisted the Mississaugas, whose land was confiscated by colonial authorities, by approaching Queen Victoria personally through back channels. He also advanced the careers of a number of talented Indigenous individuals. When Peter Jones was gravely ill at the end of his life, he stayed in the comfortable home of his old friend Ryerson in Toronto. Ryerson was a friend of Indigenous people.

It is also wrong to blame Egerton Ryerson for creating residential schools. It was Peter Jones, working with another prominent Methodist, who argued that the government should fund schools to educate Indigenous men in the new techniques in agriculture, so that they might survive in a colony where land to hunt and fish freely was rapidly disappearing. By 1842, the authorities accepted the concept, as a way to put First Nations on farms and to eliminate the expense of annual treaty payments, not as a way to assimilate them.

In 1846, government agents met with thirty chiefs, representing most of the First Nations in what is now southern Ontario. After some discussion, almost all the leaders agreed that such schools were necessary, and many even agreed to use part of their treaty payments to help support the schools. A year later, the government approached Ryerson, an acknowledged expert on education, and asked him to provide a curriculum for schools that would train Indigenous people for a settled life.

Ryerson was fully in agreement with the plan because he worried that Indigenous communities would be destroyed unless they changed their economic life. He delivered general suggestions for a curriculum — nothing else — that were typical of his day. It was patronizing, as it was based on Euro-Canadian models, but it had the support of most of the Indigenous leaders. Ryerson participated precisely because he saw education as the best instrument to protect First Nations from advancing settlement.

Two schools were established. They would be supervised by the government, and run by the Methodists, just like most of the on-reserve schools. They differed markedly from later residential schools, however. Teaching was done by teachers trained for the regular school system, not by the clergy, and children could speak their own language. Attendance was voluntary. Religion was a subject in the curriculum, not a tool of forced conversion and assimilation. As a devout Christian, Ryerson would have been horrified by the abuses and cruelties later perpetrated on Indigenous children by residential schools.

The schools were failures, mainly because of government refusal to adequately fund the project. But in this small aspect of his career Egerton Ryerson demonstrated his uniquely humane instincts of generosity and recognition of minorities. This was the same man who boldly championed schools for Catholics and for French-Canadians.

Torontonians today must recognize that Egerton Ryerson has been falsely accused and restore their pride in celebrating one of the best minds of their past.

 

spaminator

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BRAUN: Statue of Egerton Ryerson may have to go
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Publishing date:Jun 01, 2021 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 108 Comments
A statue Egerton Ryerson was defaced at Ryerson University.
A statue Egerton Ryerson was defaced at Ryerson University. PHOTO BY ERNEST DOROSZUK, TORONTO SUN /Toronto Sun
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News of the bodies of 215 Indigenous children — all undocumented deaths — has driven home the nightmare of residential schools and the reality of genocide in Canada.

In Toronto, this has re-ignited the firestorm around the name Egerton Ryerson, the educator often described as one of the architects of the residential schools.


A statue of the man on Ryerson University campus is considered by many to be a symbol of racism and colonialism; it has been defaced several times.

Now the statue has been spray-painted again, with direct reference to the 215 dead children. Dozens of pairs of children’s shoes have also been left on the ground surrounding the monument as tiny tributes.

The cry has gone out to remove Ryerson’s statue and change the name of the university, but the issue is far from clear-cut.

Ryerson had a role in the creation of the original residential schools when he wrote a report in 1847 on what Indigenous education at such schools could be.

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However, the two schools in Ontario, originally established with the help and input of Indigenous leaders, were deemed a failure and closed by 1863.

According to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report, the real damage began in the next two decades after Confederation, and with a big assist from Roman Catholic and Protestant missionaries in the Northwest.

Things really went bad with amendments to the Indian Act in 1894 that made school attendance compulsory for Indigenous children, ages seven to 16.

Ryerson had been dead a dozen years by then.

Cutting family ties had never been his intention.

Ryerson (and others) have been used as fall guys for Sir John A. Macdonald, the true architect of residential schools and the genocide that came with them.

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It was Macdonald who said children had to be separated from family while being educated, removed from what he called the “savage” influence.

Meanwhile, whatever Ryerson’s role in residential schools, his image still a source of pain to Indigenous people.


The university has been working on the educator’s legacy for over a decade. The institution established The Standing Strong (Mash Koh Wee Kah Pooh Win) Task Force, an independent body created to develop recommendations to reconcile the history of Egerton Ryerson.

They are expected to deliver recommendations and a report in September.

Not long after the discovery of the bodies at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, Ryerson President Mohamed Lachemi posted a message extending his sympathy and support; he reminded readers of the school’s Truth and Reconciliation Community Consultation Report, which aims “to acknowledge the harms of the past and move forward along the path to reconciliation.”

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At the statue on Tuesday, Ryerson student Felicity Tran said defacing the monument will at least bring awareness.

“Ryerson is a great school. The founder wasn’t so great. Students should know the good and bad side of the founder.”

Also interviewed at the statue, Anthony Lund said historical figures have a place in museums and history books, “and they don’t need to be out here being celebrated anymore. To Indigenous people, this is a symbol of colonization.”

Added Nicole Ionescu: “The statue should be taken down. It is disrupting the lives of others.”

Marta Braun, a professor at Ryerson in the School of Image Arts (and, full disclosure: a family member), is proud of the school’s Standing Strong task force and believes the university has an important opportunity to act.

“History has to be known. The evil deeds that men do have to be brought to light,” she said, at the same time acknowledging that the issue is complex.

“Should the school’s name be changed to City University? Should a public art project replace the statue?”

The statue of Ryerson, she added, sits in an ideal spot at the centre of campus, which contributes to its ongoing presence as a gathering spot.

“That would be a great place for a memorial to the dead children,” said Braun.

“But time will tell. This is why the task force was established, to answer such questions.”
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Mowich

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"I think Canada is worth celebrating. I think Canada is a great historical achievement. It is a country that people all around the world seek to join as new Canadians. It is an imperfect country but it is still a great country, just as John Macdonald was an imperfect man, but was still a great leader. If we want to get into cancelling every figure in our history who took positions on issues at the time that we now judge harshly, and rightly, in historical retrospect, then I think almost the entire founding leadership of our country gets cancelled."
Jason Kenney

Not always in agreement with AB's Premier but on this, he is absolutely 100% correct.
 
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pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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"I think Canada is worth celebrating. I think Canada is a great historical achievement. It is a country that people all around the world seek to join as new Canadians. It is an imperfect country but it is still a great country, just as John Macdonald was an imperfect man, but was still a great leader. If we want to get into cancelling every figure in our history who took positions on issues at the time that we now judge harshly, and rightly, in historical retrospect, then I think almost the entire founding leadership of our country gets cancelled."
Jason Kenney

Not always in agreement with AB's Premier but on this, he is absolutely 100% correct.
I agree . We sure did a lousy job of genocide looking at all those rich chiefs and poor Indians .
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Egerton Ryerson painting, bust moved at Queen's Park after NDP request
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jun 04, 2021 • 22 hours ago • 1 minute read • 6 Comments
A statue of Egerton Ryerson is covered in paint and graffiti with shoes left at the base at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto on Tuesday June 1, 2021.
A statue of Egerton Ryerson is covered in paint and graffiti with shoes left at the base at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto on Tuesday, June 1, 2021. PHOTO BY ERNEST DOROSZUK /Toronto Sun
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The Ontario legislature has relocated a painting and bust of Egerton Ryerson following a request from the leader of the Opposition.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath’s office wrote to the legislature’s speaker requesting that the artwork, which was displayed outside her office, be moved.


Horwath’s office says the request was made in light of the discovery in Kamloops, B.C., of what are believed to be the remains of 215 Indigenous children at a former residential school.

Ryerson was one of the architects of Canada’s residential school system, which sought to convert and assimilate Indigenous children into Canadian culture and saw them suffer widespread physical and sexual abuse.

The painting and bust were moved to different spots in the legislature on Thursday.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

A statue of Egerton Ryerson is covered in paint and graffiti with shoes left at the base at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto on Tuesday June 1, 2021.
LILLEY: Looking hard at history, not erasing it, is how we honour the memory of the 215
A statue Egerton Ryerson was defaced at Ryerson University.
BRAUN: Statue of Egerton Ryerson may have to go

Speaker Ted Arnott’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

There have been growing calls this week to rename Ryerson University and remove a statue of Egerton Ryerson from the Toronto university’s campus after the Kamloops discovery.
Ryerson-scaled[1].jpg
 
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DaSleeper

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The only thing this does is make work for the people who have to clean up this shit afterwards!
Most people look at it, roll-eyes, shrug it off! and keep going!
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Egerton Ryerson statue brought down by protesters
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jun 06, 2021 • 21 hours ago • 1 minute read • 269 Comments
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night.
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night. PHOTO BY THE EYE OPENER/TWITTER /THE TORONTO SUN
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The Egerton Ryerson statue has been toppled by protesters.

The statue, honouring one of the architects of Canada’s residential school system, was brought down Sunday night by demonstrators who gathered for a sit-in protest at the downtown Toronto university campus.


The remains of 215 Indigenous children — all undocumented deaths — were recently discovered in Kamloops, B.C. The residential schools issue has re-ignited a firestorm around the name Egerton Ryerson.

The statue at Ryerson is considered by some to be a symbol of racism and colonialism. It has been defaced several times, including spray-painted, and calls for the statue’s removal have grown in recent days.


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The school name has also come under fire for Ryerson’s role in creating the residential school system, which aimed to convert and assimilate Indigenous children into Canadian culture. Physical and sexual abuse, as well as death, were widespread.


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The university has been working on the educator’s legacy for more than a decade and the Standing Strong (Mash Koh Wee Kah Pooh Win) Task Force is expected to deliver recommendations and a report in September.

Last week, the Ontario legislature relocated a painting and bust of Egerton Ryerson following a request from Andrea Horwath, the leader of the Opposition.
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spaminator

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Ryerson University faces calls to change its name
Author of the article:Scott Laurie
Publishing date:Jun 07, 2021 • 38 minutes ago • 2 minute read • 24 Comments
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night.
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night. PHOTO BY THE EYE OPENER/TWITTER /THE TORONTO SUN
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They hacked off the head from the statue of Egerton Ryerson, now they say his name is next on the chopping block.

For them, ditching it can’t come soon enough.


The day after the toppling and beheading of the statue of Egerton Ryerson — an architect of Canada’s residential school system — people are weighing in on what they witnessed and what they think should happen next.

Kathy Le, 70, was at Sunday’s toppling — an act she figured was long overdue.

“They hammered and sawed to take the head off,” she said. “The school should have taken it down long ago.”

Walking past the remains of Ryerson University’s namesake on Monday morning, Chris McLaren expressed his support for those who destroyed the statue.

“I think it’s good. I’m glad they finally tore that trash down,” he added. “I think they could easily put something else up there. They don’t have to put up something that represents what Egerton represented.”

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For years, students and faculty have been demanding not just the statue be removed, but the name of the university also be changed.

“The statue will not be restored or replaced, “ Ryerson President and Vice-Chancellor Mohamed Lachemi said in a statement on Monday.

A Ryerson task force studying Egerton Ryerson’s legacy will not rush its work now that vandals topped the controversial statue.

“Despite the urgency expressed by some this week for immediate change, it is vital that we respect our commitment to the community for a transparent process,” task force Co-Chairs Joanne Dallaire and Catherine Ellis said in a statement.

“With the statue removed, there may be regrets that the many students, faculty, staff and community members who have worked tirelessly towards its removal were not offered the opportunity to witness the moment it came down.”


Toronto Police say they are investigating the removal of the statue.

Faculty member Kike Roach said she wasn’t surprised to see the statue defaced and toppled as it has generated “a lot of strong feelings for years.”

She is one several hundred faculty members who have signed an open letter urging quick action.

“That’s the next thing that people are concerned with,” she said. “We have begun using a transitional name: ‘X University’ ”

The task force is expected to release its conclusions before the fall semester begins.
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spaminator

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LEVY: Defacing and beheading statues accomplishes nothing
Author of the article:Sue-Ann Levy
Publishing date:Jun 07, 2021 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 122 Comments
A man ties a rope to the head from a statue of Egerton Ryerson, considered one of the architect’s of Canada’s residential school system, before throwing it into Lake Ontario in Toronto, on June 6, 2021.
A man ties a rope to the head from a statue of Egerton Ryerson, considered one of the architect’s of Canada’s residential school system, before throwing it into Lake Ontario in Toronto, on June 6, 2021. PHOTO BY REUTERS /Toronto Sun
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Around the same time Sunday night that famous folk singer and activist Joan Baez was receiving this year’s Kennedy Centre honours, a group of anarchists had set about toppling the already vandalized statue of Egerton Ryerson on Gould St.

Baez was known particularly in the 1960s for her anti-establishment, anti-Vietnam war activism. In 1967, she was arrested twice for blocking the entrance of a California Armed Forces induction centre and spent a month in jail.


But whether she was involved in civil rights marches or protesting the war or was resisting paying taxes or supporting LGBT rights, her actions were always non-violent.

It’s hard to imagine that she spent a month in jail for blocking an entrance to a centre where would-be soldiers were registering to be sent off to Vietnam, considering the enabling attitudes of today, some 50 years later.

Toronto Police spokesperson Connie Osborne said they are investigating the destruction of the Ryerson statue from a public safety standpoint as a vehicle was used on a public highway to pull the statue.

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She said there is the potential that those involved could have been injured, as well as others in the area.

But I’m going to bet no one will be charged.

Still, I can’t help but think of Baez’s brand of activism vs. what has substituted for activism of the “woke” and the progressives, who have taken their campaigns of perceived wrongs to the streets — in a shockingly violent way.

While seemingly celebrated in other media, I found it appalling that a group of anarchists felt the need — following a rally — to yank down the already defaced statue of Ryerson on the grounds of Ryerson University, remove his head, block traffic and subsequently toss the statue’s head in Lake Ontario.

According to reports, they did so while cheering.

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It reminded me of the Romans cheering on as gladiators fought to their bloody deaths — sometimes with animals involved — in the Colosseum of ancient times.

When did we lose such a sense of perspective that this kind of violent act is celebrated as a means to correct the hurts of 100 or more years ago?

The group had every right to protest the disturbing find last week of the remains of 215 Indigenous children on the site of a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C.

They had every reason to promote Indigenous rights — and to recognize the role of Egerton Ryerson in the creation of residential schools.


But Ryerson died 139 years ago after leaving a tremendous mark on education. He created public schools, school boards, uniform school textbooks and libraries in schools in addition to the template for residential schools.

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We can’t simply erase his other accomplishments.

If Ryerson University officials choose to spend time and money on a task force — the Standing Strong Task Force — and hundreds of community conversations to consider whether to change the university’s name, let them knock themselves out.

But frankly, the actions of Sunday’s statue demolition crowd — foolish and immature — represent the disturbing indoctrination of entitled and perhaps bored students and activists, who are desperately in search of a cause.

It is indicative of a culture that now tries to cancel anything that reeks of their favorite buzz words — colonialism, racism, oppression, and social justice.

Contrast that to Baez, who travelled to Vietnam and other oppressed areas, to assist with human rights causes — winning many awards for her efforts. While I don’t necessarily agree with her politics, I admire her willingness to get her hands dirty.

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The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night.
Egerton Ryerson statue brought down by protesters
A statue Egerton Ryerson was defaced at Ryerson University.
BRAUN: Statue of Egerton Ryerson may have to go
A statue of Egerton Ryerson is covered in paint and graffiti with shoes left at the base at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto on Tuesday, June 1, 2021.
Egerton Ryerson painting, bust moved at Queen's Park after NDP request

The fact that Ryerson’s head now rests somewhere in Lake Ontario and his headless statue is full of paint and graffiti is a disturbing indictment of our current political climate.

It tells us that if we don’t like history or someone else’s point of view, we can just erase it or tell those who annoy us to go jump in the lake.

SLevy@postmedia.com
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taxslave

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So where are the police and security guards hiding while worthless freeloading leftards are destroying artwork? If they are not stopped they will soon progress to burning history books that do not fit the whitewashed dogma.
 

spaminator

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BONOKOSKI: If Ryerson changes its name, there shall be fire
Author of the article:Mark Bonokoski
Publishing date:Jun 09, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 3 minute read • 63 Comments
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night.
The Egerton Ryerson statue was toppled Sunday night. PHOTO BY THE EYE OPENER/TWITTER /THE TORONTO SUN
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I am a graduate of Ryerson.

A few days ago, a group of far-left thugs in Toronto toppled the already-defaced statue of Egerton Ryerson, the founder of the polytechnic institute that has grown into a university.


No one was arrested. The university’s administration has played cuckold and should all resign.

The police shirked their duty and should be charged.

Mob rule won.

I graduated from Ryerson way back in 1972 with a diploma in journalism. The school was Ryerson Polytechnic Institute then and was dismissed by university types as Rye High.

I was just a kid from the Eastern Ontario village of Lyn, a town so small it didn’t even have a village idiot. Until Ryerson entered my life, I had never been to Toronto.

I immediately bought in. Soon my hair was long to fit in with the Yorkville hippie crowd. I didn’t do drugs, even weed. It made me paranoid and therefore very uncomfortable.

I was also farm boy tough, and a good thing, too.

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The timing of the destruction of Egerton Ryerson’s statue could not have been better played.

As an educator at the end of the 19th century, he was one of the architects of the residential school system that was bent on “civilizing” students by “killing the Indian in the child,” and news had just broken that perhaps 215 unmarked graves had been found at the defunct residential school in Kamloops B.C.

The thugs did not seek permission to tear down Ryerson’s statue, lob off his fingers, and toss his severed head into Lake Ontario.

What’s next? Burning down the Ryerson Elementary School in Hamilton, even after it voted to change its name? Or driving up to Parry Sound and the nearby town of Ryerson and raising hell there?

Far-left thugs can get away with such action but if a right-wing agitator did the same to, say, the turtle sculpture coming to Toronto’s Nathan Phillips Square next year, they’d be arrested with cries to have their fingers lobbed off, and their heads figuratively tossed into the Lake of Shining Waters.

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And rightly so.

Speaking of Nathan Phillips, maybe commemorations to him should be tumbled, too. Under his direction as Toronto mayor, he pursued an aggressive agenda of demolishing heritage structures throughout the city in order to “modernize” it.

Large blocks of downtown Toronto were purchased and razed and many landmark buildings were destroyed such as the University Avenue Armouries, the Chorley estate, and the General Post Office that was built in 1873 and was the most expensive federal building ever constructed in Canada.


Surely that pisses off some far-left imbecile enough for him or her to seek out and destroy all things Nathan Phillips for his uprooting of so many people and his heritage destruction.

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But John A. Macdonald is next. He’s a marked man.

I am no defender of Egerton Ryerson but men of his generation cannot, and should not, be judged by the standards of today.

History, too, cannot be changed. Egerton Ryerson, for example, not only helped design the residential school system, he also built the public education system that still exists today in Canada, complete with school boards and elected trustees.

All along, he thought he was doing right. He did not envision the onslaught of tuberculosis, no more than we envisioned COVID-19.

When Ryerson University changes its name, because the administration’s wimps will, I will dig out my diploma from storage and burn it in the office of the university’s president.

Of course I’ll be criminally charged.

markbonokoski@gmail.com