Ryerson University

Rohan

The Devil
Mar 5, 2006
132
0
16
Melbourne
www.thewackylounge.com
My bro got llow % in his 12 xams....now mom and dad are looking at sending him to toronto.......


Sincxe he got very low marks he cannot get admission ino a degree course......


So what they decided was to apply for pre-university in ryerson


After the 6 months course he would then be able to get into a computer engineering corse........


what do u guys think......

is ryerson a goos university to do engineering if no give some options plsssssss......


its kind of urgent

thanks

rohan
 

Daz_Hockey

Council Member
Nov 21, 2005
1,927
7
38
I heard it was shockingly rubbish, sort of like southampton solent university compared to southampton university over here.....Ryerson is in a bit of a dodgy area as I recall too, tell him to watch his wallet.

often over here we find that too many people are doing degree's over here who are too stupid or lazy to do one, but just wanna waste time, perhaps he should so some sort of apprentice work, plus it's god-expensive over there, why spend it all on someone who clearly isnt bothered?
 

Said1

Hubba Hubba
Apr 18, 2005
5,313
46
48
48
Das Kapital
My nephew goes to Ryerson, he's taking engineering - areospace or something like that. He likes it, no real complaints and he's far from lazy and stupid.
 

Gilgamesh

Council Member
Nov 15, 2014
1,066
38
48
I heard it was shockingly rubbish, sort of like southampton solent university compared to southampton university over here.....Ryerson is in a bit of a dodgy area as I recall too, tell him to watch his wallet.

often over here we find that too many people are doing degree's over here who are too stupid or lazy to do one, but just wanna waste time, perhaps he should so some sort of apprentice work, plus it's god-expensive over there, why spend it all on someone who clearly isnt bothered?
It is a waste of space, and time. IMO the degree is worth less than used toilet paper. The young man would be better off in a trade where he would probably make more money and be more happy,

Mom and Dad, don't let your snobbery ruin a good kids life.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,387
780
113
Ryerson School of Journalism leaders step down amid calls to address racism
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Liam Casey
Publishing date:Mar 09, 2021 • 5 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble30 Comments
Ryerson University in downtown Toronto.
Ryerson University in downtown Toronto. PHOTO BY ERNEST DOROSZUK /Toronto Sun
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The heads of the prestigious Ryerson School of Journalism have stepped down amid calls for sweeping changes at the school to address systemic racism and discrimination.

Janice Neil, the chair of the journalism school, and Lisa Taylor, associate chair and the school’s undergraduate program director, resigned on Sunday.

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Both noted in their resignation letters that they had worked to address issues of systemic racism and discrimination at the school during their years as leaders.


On Monday morning, Ryerson journalism students issued a public letter accusing the school of failing to represent and support Black, Indigenous, people of colour and LGBTQ students in the program.

The letter said the school has contributed to an unsafe learning environment rife with discrimination that has left students traumatized.

In an email to The Canadian Press on Monday evening, Neil said that under her leadership, the school had increased diversity of the teaching faculty, introduced new courses about reporting on race, Indigenous issues and the LGBTQ community, and offered mental health supports for students.

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But Neil also acknowledged that many students think change has not come fast enough or is broad enough to make an impact,.

“One of the things I’ve learned as a leader is to recognize when It’s time for a major reset and that time is now,” she wrote. “To get to the next level will require different leadership.”


In her resignation letter, Lisa Taylor explained her reason for stepping down.

“Some students don’t believe that I’m in their corner, which means they may not turn to me if they’re in need, and having an undergraduate program director who is a trusted resource for only some students is truly inequitable,” she wrote.

A spokeswoman for Ryerson said the school “continues to acknowledge the work that needs to be done to address systemic racism” and will continue to take concrete steps to address the students’ concerns.
 
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Mowich

Hall of Fame Member
Dec 25, 2005
16,231
364
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Eagle Creek

Opinion: Egerton Ryerson has been falsely accused of trying to erase Indigenous culture


The City of Toronto recently proposed to create 34 neighbourhoods for administrative reasons, labelling one of them as “Ryerson” to capture the downtown area mainly occupied by the University campus that bears his name. The initiative rebooted the demand to remove Ryerson’s statue on Gould Street and to change the name of the university dedicated to his memory.

Egerton Ryerson (1803-1882), the Methodist minister who has long been celebrated as the founder of the Ontario public school system, stands accused of creating a residential school system designed to stamp out Indigenous culture. Nothing could be further from the truth.
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission investigated the issue, but its final report made no such claim. It did not seem to matter: a small but nameless constituency still argues that Ryerson was the predecessor to federal politicians who launched new residential schools in 1883, and should therefore be erased from public memory.

Ryerson is being misjudged. He was not a racist and he did not discriminate against Indigenous people. It was the exact opposite! As a young man he was appointed to the Credit mission, home of the Mississaugas. He learned their language, worked in the fields with the people of the settlement and became a life-long friend of future chief Kahkewaquonaby (Sacred Feathers), known in English as Peter Jones.

In fact, it was in recognition of his services to the Mississauga, that Ryerson was adopted and given the name of a recently deceased chief, “Cheechock” or “Chechalk.”

After he left the Credit mission, Ryerson kept in touch with Peter Jones. In the 1830s he assisted the Mississaugas, whose land was confiscated by colonial authorities, by approaching Queen Victoria personally through back channels. He also advanced the careers of a number of talented Indigenous individuals. When Peter Jones was gravely ill at the end of his life, he stayed in the comfortable home of his old friend Ryerson in Toronto. Ryerson was a friend of Indigenous people.

It is also wrong to blame Egerton Ryerson for creating residential schools. It was Peter Jones, working with another prominent Methodist, who argued that the government should fund schools to educate Indigenous men in the new techniques in agriculture, so that they might survive in a colony where land to hunt and fish freely was rapidly disappearing. By 1842, the authorities accepted the concept, as a way to put First Nations on farms and to eliminate the expense of annual treaty payments, not as a way to assimilate them.

In 1846, government agents met with thirty chiefs, representing most of the First Nations in what is now southern Ontario. After some discussion, almost all the leaders agreed that such schools were necessary, and many even agreed to use part of their treaty payments to help support the schools. A year later, the government approached Ryerson, an acknowledged expert on education, and asked him to provide a curriculum for schools that would train Indigenous people for a settled life.

Ryerson was fully in agreement with the plan because he worried that Indigenous communities would be destroyed unless they changed their economic life. He delivered general suggestions for a curriculum — nothing else — that were typical of his day. It was patronizing, as it was based on Euro-Canadian models, but it had the support of most of the Indigenous leaders. Ryerson participated precisely because he saw education as the best instrument to protect First Nations from advancing settlement.

Two schools were established. They would be supervised by the government, and run by the Methodists, just like most of the on-reserve schools. They differed markedly from later residential schools, however. Teaching was done by teachers trained for the regular school system, not by the clergy, and children could speak their own language. Attendance was voluntary. Religion was a subject in the curriculum, not a tool of forced conversion and assimilation. As a devout Christian, Ryerson would have been horrified by the abuses and cruelties later perpetrated on Indigenous children by residential schools.

The schools were failures, mainly because of government refusal to adequately fund the project. But in this small aspect of his career Egerton Ryerson demonstrated his uniquely humane instincts of generosity and recognition of minorities. This was the same man who boldly championed schools for Catholics and for French-Canadians.

Torontonians today must recognize that Egerton Ryerson has been falsely accused and restore their pride in celebrating one of the best minds of their past.