Queen Elizabeth

Tecumsehsbones

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Hmm. . . if a foreign head of state/government were a veteran, would it have been appropriate for them to wear their medals on their suits?

E.g., if George H.W. Bush (Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Asia/Pacific Campaign Medal) were President, would it have been permitted by protocol for him to wear his American medals on his suit, as Harry and Andrew wore their British medals?
 

Blackleaf

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Andrew I could see.

But Harry... not that I think Harry will care, but at the same time, he may question why if it interferes with things he's involved with that might dove-tail into his role as a Royal. I also thought it odd that Harry wasn't in uniform. Again, Andrew I could get, but Harry?

Likely in trying to show family unity he didn't say anything, but the military was ALWAYS important to Harry; this will not have him feel kind towards his father.

King Charles III planning on amending the law on who will stand in for him should he be absent or incapacitated, cutting out Prince Andrew, Prince Harry and Princess Beatrice

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Currently, the spouse of a monarch and the four adults who are next in line to take the throne can be sent on official business as counsellors of the state, according to the 1937 Regency Act.

That now includes Prince Harry, Prince Andrew and Princess Beatrice who are not working members of the Royal Family.

It is understood the King wishes to amend the current standings so that others can step in should the sovereign is abroad or incapacitated.

According to reports, the Earl of Wessex and the Princess Royal could be contenders to take on the role in the King's absence.

It is claimed the move be a part of a wider shake-up of the duties of working and non-working royals.

King Charles is believed to want to take the relevant steps to have the law changed as soon as he can.

Tweaks to the legislation would need to be enacted by the Houses of Parliament.

When Queen Elizabeth was reigning, roles were take up by the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Sussex and the Duke of York.

 

Blackleaf

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Hmm. . . if a foreign head of state/government were a veteran, would it have been appropriate for them to wear their medals on their suits?

E.g., if George H.W. Bush (Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Asia/Pacific Campaign Medal) were President, would it have been permitted by protocol for him to wear his American medals on his suit, as Harry and Andrew wore their British medals?

The Monarch is the boss in our country - the Head of State. Elizabeth II stripped Andrew and Harry of some of their titles and now Charles III plans on stripping them of their roles. The US President can strip people of their medals and so can the British monarch and other heads of state.
 

Blackleaf

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Meghan Markle ‘delayed’ the public reunion after ‘breaking protocol’

The public reunion between Will, Kate, Harry and Meghan was delayed by an hour after the Duchess of Sussex's PR team booked an “alternate” walkabout which was later cancelled.

A royal insider told Fox News Digital Meghan “broke protocol” by organising a separate walkabout which left King Charles III to force his sons to reunite publicly as a foursome.

 

Tecumsehsbones

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The Monarch is the boss in our country - the Head of State. Elizabeth II stripped Andrew and Harry of some of their titles and now Charles III plans on stripping them of their roles. The US President can strip people of their medals and so can the British monarch and other heads of state.
That actually wasn't the question, but thanks. New info's always good.
 

Blackleaf

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That actually wasn't the question, but thanks. New info's always good.

Oh, I see what you mean.

If Mike Tindall, the England 2003 Rugby World Cup winning husband of the Queen's granddaughter Zara Phillips, can wear medals (whatever they are for, I don't know) to the Queen's funeral then I'm sure heads of state would have been able to.

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Blackleaf

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Princess Charlotte, who is now third in line to the Throne, the daughter of Prince William and Catherine, was seen crying today at her great-grandmother's funeral.

 

Blackleaf

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How the Queen's funeral was received around the world

As many as 4 billion people watched the grand proceedings. How was it seen by our allies the Americans, Australians and French and by the people of Hong Kong, the former British territory in a struggle with China?

 

Blackleaf

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Blooms of gold, pink and deep burgundy, sitting amid rich green foliage, adorned the Queen's coffin during her funeral service. The colourful flowers and plants, taken from the gardens of royal properties, were chosen for their symbolism.

At King Charles III's request, the wreath for Her Majesty's funeral contained flowers and foliage cut from the gardens of Buckingham Palace and Clarence House in London - and Highgrove House in Gloucestershire.

It included foliage chosen for its symbolism:
  • Rosemary for remembrance - rosemary has long been associated with remembrance
  • Myrtle, the ancient symbol of a happy marriage, cut from a plant that was grown from a sprig of myrtle in The Queen's wedding bouquet in 1947
  • English oak, a national symbol of strength, in a nod to the Queen's constancy and steadfast duty. It also symbolises strength of love
In among the flowers was a handwritten card which read: "In loving and devoted memory, Charles R."

The flowers in the Queen's funeral wreath featured scented pelargoniums, garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias and scabious, all in shades of gold, pink and deep burgundy, with touches of white, to reflect the colours in the Royal Standard flag on which it sat.

Royal funeral wreaths have traditionally been sombre, in white and green tones, says Gemma Kavanagh, from London florist Moyses Stevens, but the colours of the flowers can also be chosen to reflect a flag - which is what we saw on Monday.

King Charles is well-known for his commitment to the environment and, at his request, the wreath was made in a sustainable way - without the use of floral foam but, instead, created in a nest of English moss and oak branches.

Rosemary, a herb, has long been a symbol of remembrance because herbalists thought it was good for memory, says Prof Fiona Stafford, author of The Brief Life of Flowers. "But rosemary is also associated with love and loyalty, and it was used for marriage bouquets or for burials, as well for strewing on the dead. So it's a really, really appropriate one to be part of the wreath," she says.

Rosemary also featured when the King gave his first TV address to the nation. He was flanked by a portrait of his mother on one side and a small silver vase with sweet peas and sprigs of rosemary on the other.

The Queen loved flowers from her garden - every Monday, the gardeners at Buckingham Palace would send up a fresh posy of flowers for her desk when she was in residence. Gardener Alan Titchmarsh recalled in an article that the Queen "loved primroses, lily-of-the-valley and other modest blooms far more than elaborate exotics; something that speaks volumes about her personality".

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Blackleaf

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I got a call from my lady at 5:00 this morning. "Are you ready to watch the funeral?"

Um. . . no.

I occasionally looked in on the Beeb's feed.

I would have been rather annoyed being woken at 5am by someone asking me if I'm watching the TV, even if it's a state funeral. I'd rather be fast asleep having the bizarre dreams I usually have.
 

Taxslave2

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Meghan Markle ‘delayed’ the public reunion after ‘breaking protocol’

The public reunion between Will, Kate, Harry and Meghan was delayed by an hour after the Duchess of Sussex's PR team booked an “alternate” walkabout which was later cancelled.

A royal insider told Fox News Digital Meghan “broke protocol” by organising a separate walkabout which left King Charles III to force his sons to reunite publicly as a foursome.

Good for her. Protocol is made to be broken.
 

Blackleaf

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King Charles III's less formal photo as working monarch​

By Sean Coughlan
Royal correspondent
23rd September 2022

An official picture of King Charles III has been released, showing him for the first time carrying out his new duties as Head of State.

Prominent in the photograph, taken in Buckingham Palace, is the red box with official documents to be signed.

His signature is visible as "Charles R" - for Charles Rex, Latin for King.

In a symbol of continuity, the photo behind him shows Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, in a picture they had given to King George VI in 1951.

Royal photographs have often been seen as sending messages, expressed in symbols rather than direct words.

And this shows a king getting straight down to business, with his work literally in the foreground. The angle of the picture emphasises the desk and the papers he has to sign.

It is not a traditional, formal photo with the monarch sitting stiffly, facing forward at the desk.

Instead he's seen as though captured in a moment of concentration and movement, not looking at the camera.

The image uses natural light from a window rather than studio lighting.

King Charles at work


There have been suggestions that the new king will have a more approachable and inclusive style, with his reign focusing on a smaller group of working royals.

The room where the picture was taken is the "Eighteenth Century Room" and the photo has a rather painterly quality, with its rich red and gold colours, the King portrayed in half-light and half-shadow.

Adding to this atmosphere is an I8th Century Italian oil painting by Francesco Zuccarelli in the background.

The photo was taken last week and the King is shown wearing a black tie of mourning. It must have been a time when he was preoccupied by the loss of his mother and his responsibilities in the run-up to the funeral.

But in this picture, taken by Victoria Jones for PA, he is shown taking up his constitutional duties as King, pen in one hand, the other hand touching the red boxes that will become part of his daily round.

 

Blackleaf

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Morpeth mum's surprise at seeing son carrying the Queen's coffin​

23rd September 2022
BBC News

Pallbearers carrying the Queen's coffin

David Sanderson, front right, was one of eight pallbearers carrying the lead-lined, oak coffin

The mother of one of the Queen's pallbearers had no idea he would be carrying the late monarch's coffin.


David Sanderson, 19, from Morpeth, was one of eight soldiers from the Queen's Company 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards, to bear the oak casket in London and Windsor.

Carolyn Sanderson said she was "beyond proud" of her son.

"We were looking at some photographs of the rehearsal and my husband said it looked like our David," she said.

"I looked and said 'Of course it is!'

"He will never forget this. He looked after her from the very start to her last journey."

Pallbearers carrying the Queen's coffin

The pallbearers carried out their duties under the gaze of millions around the world

The lead-lined coffin weighed about 550lbs (250kg) and was draped in the Royal Standard.

Guardsman Sanderson, a former pupil at King Edward VI School in Morpeth, was supporting the front left of the casket.

He enlisted three years ago, training at Harrogate and Catterick Garrison before joining the Grenadier Guards, the same regiment with which his late grandfather John Sanderson carried out national service, the Local Democracy Reporting Service said.

The Queen had strong links to the regiment, which is the British Army's most senior infantry division and known for its distinctive red tunics and tall black bearskin caps.

Guardsman Sanderson's mother said she had only spoken to him briefly since the funeral.

"I had just stopped crying about the Queen and I started crying about David," she said. "Seeing him on the television going to Westminster Abbey was just amazing. I just lost it - that's our David.

"They were all brilliant. I think it was perfect."

 

Blackleaf

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That says a lot that you think it was 'glory days': racism, exploitation and so on are good things in your book.

The UK isn't the only one with 'glory days', and actual glory days, either.

It was the empire which created Canada, of course.

Canada owes its very existence to the British Empire and should therefore be grateful.