Ottawa reveals plan to welcome 500,000 immigrants per year by 2025

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,538
4,265
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The federal government announced last week it was raising immigration targets for the next three years. It now aims to bring in almost 1.5 million new permanent residents by the end of 2025.

The Trudeau government said the goal is to bring in 500,000 immigrants annually, up from 405,000 admitted last year.

That’s good. Immigration is the economic lifeblood of this country. We need newcomers to fill labour shortages and to generate vital tax revenues to keep our social services afloat.

Next year’s target includes 266,210 “economic immigrants.” These are skilled workers, hopefully carefully selected to fill gaps in our economy.

Where we urge caution, however, is how these immigrants are settled.

Many urban centres across the country are facing a housing crunch. Rents and house prices have skyrocketed. The government must prepare potential newcomers for the fact they may have to move to parts of the country that are not the vital hubs of downtown Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver.


We cannot bring immigrants into this country in a haphazard fashion. We must make sure the infrastructure is in place to support them. They must be an asset, not a burden, for society.

There’s no point bringing immigrants here with unrealistic expectations about what they can expect. It’s tough enough for young people already in this country to pay their rent or buy a house. Adding hundreds of thousands more to that housing shortage is not a realistic policy.

Predictably, Quebec Premier Francois Legault has said his province can’t accept more than 50,000 immigrants. He said taking more than that would be a threat to the French language in Quebec.

Quebec Immigration Minister Christine Frechette said the province is holding firm on that 50,000 limit.

“That will not change no matter how many immigrants arrive elsewhere in Canada,” she told reporters.

That short-sighted approach will ultimately spell stagnation for a province that needs immigration to grow.

This country must remember also the debt we owe to Afghan interpreters and others who worked with the Canadian military overseas. They’ve already shown their loyalty to this country. If we’re opening our borders wider, then we should get our priorities right and make sure all those people who put their lives on the line helping Canadians find their way to safety in this country.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
25,054
5,720
113
B.C.
The federal government announced last week it was raising immigration targets for the next three years. It now aims to bring in almost 1.5 million new permanent residents by the end of 2025.

The Trudeau government said the goal is to bring in 500,000 immigrants annually, up from 405,000 admitted last year.

That’s good. Immigration is the economic lifeblood of this country. We need newcomers to fill labour shortages and to generate vital tax revenues to keep our social services afloat.

Next year’s target includes 266,210 “economic immigrants.” These are skilled workers, hopefully carefully selected to fill gaps in our economy.

Where we urge caution, however, is how these immigrants are settled.

Many urban centres across the country are facing a housing crunch. Rents and house prices have skyrocketed. The government must prepare potential newcomers for the fact they may have to move to parts of the country that are not the vital hubs of downtown Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver.


We cannot bring immigrants into this country in a haphazard fashion. We must make sure the infrastructure is in place to support them. They must be an asset, not a burden, for society.

There’s no point bringing immigrants here with unrealistic expectations about what they can expect. It’s tough enough for young people already in this country to pay their rent or buy a house. Adding hundreds of thousands more to that housing shortage is not a realistic policy.

Predictably, Quebec Premier Francois Legault has said his province can’t accept more than 50,000 immigrants. He said taking more than that would be a threat to the French language in Quebec.

Quebec Immigration Minister Christine Frechette said the province is holding firm on that 50,000 limit.

“That will not change no matter how many immigrants arrive elsewhere in Canada,” she told reporters.

That short-sighted approach will ultimately spell stagnation for a province that needs immigration to grow.

This country must remember also the debt we owe to Afghan interpreters and others who worked with the Canadian military overseas. They’ve already shown their loyalty to this country. If we’re opening our borders wider, then we should get our priorities right and make sure all those people who put their lives on the line helping Canadians find their way to safety in this country.
But we are going to meet our carbon reduction goals by bringing in more emitters . I love liberal math .
 

The_Foxer

Council Member
Aug 9, 2022
1,746
1,135
113
But we are going to meet our carbon reduction goals by bringing in more emitters . I love liberal math .
Of course they are - carbon targets are often set per capita. If you bring in 1.5 million people, then that year you get to base your per capita rate on a lot more people! Carbon rates (per capita) go down, targets met! I mean - seeing as the only place for them to live will be a tent city or crammed into someone else's already overflowing apartment it's not like they'll produce a LOT more carbon for the first year or two.

That's how liberals think. How can we make it LOOK like we did something?