Liberals, NDP leadership have tentative deal to support Trudeau government to 2025

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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Man, I haven't had a heapin' helpin' of Jagmeet Singh in about forever!

I need to run down to that storefront and pick some up. Do they take orders on the internet, or do I have to call it in?
 
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harrylee

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Mar 22, 2019
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Man, I haven't had a heapin' helpin' of Jagmeet Singh in about forever!

I need to run down to that storefront and pick some up. Do they take orders on the internet, or do I have to call it in?
Justin just has to rattle his chain and he comes a runnin'
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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A little political horse-trading going on, hardly anything new about that. The same goes for butt-hurt Conservatives who can't find anyone else willing to get on board with their policies, nothing new about that. Maybe a CPC/PPC/Maverick coalition ?
Looks to me the NDP just put themselves into the realm of irrelevancy . They have been sitting in the cat seat , could have pulled the plug and picked up mega support from the disgusted liberal voter , now the NDP vote will be going liberal . Good job Jagmeet .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Justin just has to rattle his chain and he comes a runnin'
Better his chain than his zipper….

Anyway, Who cares? From Western Canada anyway…. Whether Justin and Jagmeet have a formal or informal arrangement… it changes nothing out here. Just more of the same, but they (Libs & NDP) aren’t pretending to be something different at this point now. Kudos on their hand holding honesty as of yesterday, & I rarely use the term honesty with respect to Trudeau Libs…
 
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Ron in Regina

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On a Monday (a Monday back in early November of 2021 min you), NDP MP Charlie Angus said his party’s leader, Jagmeet Singh, had an “initial conversation” with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about striking a formal agreement to prop up the minority Liberal government for the next three years. On Tuesday, Singh said there had been “no discussion at all of a coalition,” but that he was “open to hearing from the government.”

Though both parties stress that that such a deal may never materialize, there is very little downside for the governing Liberals to pursue such an option: they have, after all, had no trouble pushing their legislation through a minority Parliament for the past two years, with the support of the NDP and Bloc Québécois; a formal agreement would simply mean the prime minister would not need to worry about building ad-hoc coalitions to pass each individual bill. And the only price he’d have to pay is adding a little more socialism to his left-wing policy pot.


Yet even without a formal agreement in the last Parliament, Singh was able to get concessions from the Liberals in exchange for his support, such as when the NDP agreed to prop up the government in September 2020, in exchange for expanded sick benefits and continued pandemic supports.

One way or another, it’s not going to be hard for these two parties to find common ground. A look at their election platforms shows that their differences are more a matter of degree, rather than substance.

The pendulum will undoubtedly swing the other way at some point. Unchecked government spending will eventually affect our credit score, making it more costly to borrow money. High taxes and an official vendetta against Canadian resources will put people out of work and scare away investors. Increased carbon taxes and a depressed supply of petroleum and natural gas will drive up the cost of living for Canadians who are already struggling to cope with high inflation.

What this country needs is for the Conservative party to take a clear stand against these disastrous policies, so it will be seen as a credible alternative when the Liberals’ house of cards eventually comes crashing down. Until that happens, none of us should be surprised that there are no checks on Justin Trudeau’s relentless drive to vastly increase the size and scope of the Canadian state.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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The decision on March 21 of an official agreement between the Liberals and the New Democratic Party intended to keep the minority government afloat with outside support until its mandate expires in 2025. Coming in the wake of an impending committee inquiry into the government’s unprecedented use of emergency powers, the deal between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh reeks of opportunism.

With Singh’s support, Trudeau’s government will now sail through what could have been difficult hearings on their use of — and possible misuse of — government power. How ‘bout that? Couldn’t have seen that one coming with respect to accountability.
 
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Nick Danger

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Jul 21, 2013
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Penticton, BC
JT and the Libs have bought themselves an insurance policy against non-confidence votes for the next three years, as a political strategy you can't argue against that. If the LIbs follow though on the promises made in exchange for NDP support this would be the largest expeansion of our public health system in a generation. In my eye this is a good thing.
 

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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On a Monday (a Monday back in early November of 2021 min you), NDP MP Charlie Angus said his party’s leader, Jagmeet Singh, had an “initial conversation” with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about striking a formal agreement to prop up the minority Liberal government for the next three years. On Tuesday, Singh said there had been “no discussion at all of a coalition,” but that he was “open to hearing from the government.”

Though both parties stress that that such a deal may never materialize, there is very little downside for the governing Liberals to pursue such an option: they have, after all, had no trouble pushing their legislation through a minority Parliament for the past two years, with the support of the NDP and Bloc Québécois; a formal agreement would simply mean the prime minister would not need to worry about building ad-hoc coalitions to pass each individual bill. And the only price he’d have to pay is adding a little more socialism to his left-wing policy pot.


Yet even without a formal agreement in the last Parliament, Singh was able to get concessions from the Liberals in exchange for his support, such as when the NDP agreed to prop up the government in September 2020, in exchange for expanded sick benefits and continued pandemic supports.

One way or another, it’s not going to be hard for these two parties to find common ground. A look at their election platforms shows that their differences are more a matter of degree, rather than substance.

The pendulum will undoubtedly swing the other way at some point. Unchecked government spending will eventually affect our credit score, making it more costly to borrow money. High taxes and an official vendetta against Canadian resources will put people out of work and scare away investors. Increased carbon taxes and a depressed supply of petroleum and natural gas will drive up the cost of living for Canadians who are already struggling to cope with high inflation.

What this country needs is for the Conservative party to take a clear stand against these disastrous policies, so it will be seen as a credible alternative when the Liberals’ house of cards eventually comes crashing down. Until that happens, none of us should be surprised that there are no checks on Justin Trudeau’s relentless drive to vastly increase the size and scope of the Canadian state.
The conservatives can install Charest as leader , that should work , three liberal parties and the Bloc .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,385
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Regina, Saskatchewan
JT and the Libs have bought themselves an insurance policy against non-confidence votes for the next three years, as a political strategy you can't argue against that.
Bought with what? As a tax payer I could argue that strategy as the budget balances itself.

Did they buy accountability to Canadians? Nope. This will give Justin his monarchy and the NDP obsolescence as long as he keeps getting bones thrown at him from the public coffers and by 2025 Jagmeet will get his golden parachute, & maybe Justin can salvage a UN seat to some Climate Committee.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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JT and the Libs have bought themselves an insurance policy against non-confidence votes for the next three years, as a political strategy you can't argue against that. If the LIbs follow though on the promises made in exchange for NDP support this would be the largest expeansion of our public health system in a generation. In my eye this is a good thing.
Really , you live in B.C. How are those wait lists , getting any shorter ? We do such a good job employing health care administrators , we should find a way to hire more , that is sure to work . Front line workers , who needs them .