It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Earth’s Diminishing Magnetic Dipole Moment is Driving Global Carbon Dioxide Levels and Global WarmingDavid A. E. Vares1,2, Michael A. Persinger1,2,3
1Human Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
2Behavioural Neuroscience Programs, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
3Biomolecular Sciences, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2015.68068 PDF HTML XML 5,761 Downloads 9,409 Views Citations
Abstract

Although there are powerful models that couple human activity with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and global warming, the relationships are still based upon correlations rather than causation. Consequently, there is always the probability of a third factor that produces both. Analyses of the diminishing magnetic dipole moment of the earth and the increased carbon dioxide levels and global temperature within the last 40 years revealed correlations of -0.99 and -0.90, respectively. This powerful association has been reported by other researchers. Why it has been ignored by the scientific community is not clear. The sources of the shift in average geomagnetic (magnetic dipole) intensity have not been identified but these relatively rapid decreases and increases have occurred historically with onsets of periods of warming and cooling, including glacier formation. If the long-time quasi-periodicity of the earth’s magnetic dipole moment is coupled to alterations in solar activity as the system moves around the galactic center, then attribution of elevated carbon dioxide-temperature to human sources rather than actual etiologies can be counterproductive to adaptation.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Oh good, just in time for an epic Solar Maximum.

Maybe it won't snow in Vancouver for the first time in a decade?

El Niño advisory is active for the coming months as the ocean anomaly continues to grow. A strong El Niño event is expected to develop, with Winter weather expected across the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Ocean anomalies play an important role in atmospheric circulation and our weather on smaller and larger scales. That is especially true during the Winter season when the pressure systems are strongest, and the energy levels are high.

An El Niño event is also used as an indicator that tells us what the current state of the atmosphere is. You will see how El Niño is currently growing and how it is expected to influence the upcoming Winter season of 2023/2024 on many different levels.
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Taxslave2

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Aug 13, 2022
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Canadian municipalities looking to become ’spongier’ to build climate resilience
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Morgan Lowrie
Published Oct 08, 2023 • 4 minute read

MONTREAL — From green roofs in Toronto to Vancouver’s rain city strategy, Canadian cities are looking to become “sponges” in order to help mitigate some of the effects of extreme rainfall events.


In Montreal, Mayor Valerie Plante announced last week that the city plans to develop some 30 additional “sponge parks” designed to catch and absorb rainwater and keep it from flowing into overburdened sewers during extreme rain events.


Those, combined with an additional 400 “sponge sidewalks,” featuring added vegetation squares, will help the city retain the equivalent of three Olympic swimming pools in water at “half the cost of underground works,” the city said in a news release.

Melanie Glorieux, a sustainable landscape planner with the firm Rousseau Lefebvre said that while the concept of building a “sponge city” isn’t new, it’s an idea that more and more municipalities are embracing as they cope with extreme weather.


The idea, she said, is to divert stormwater into low areas or channels planted with trees, shrubs and grasses, so that more of it is absorbed on the surface and less flows into sewers, lakes or rivers. As an added benefit, the plants filter the water before it enters the system, removing some of the pollutants it picks up from streets.

“Firstly, we reduce the quantity of water (sent to sewers), and secondly, we improve the quality of what is there,” she said

The goal is to reverse some of the harm done by the last 40 to 50 years of car-oriented urban development, which involved replacing natural spaces that soak up water with impermeable infrastructure such as roads and parking lots. In place of absorption, water was redirected to underground sewer systems, which can become overwhelmed by heavy rain, causing flooding and contamination of rivers.


The sponge city concept, which first rose to prominence in China, is essentially the opposite: “limit run-off and maximize infiltration,” Glorieux said.

Green infrastructure can be incorporated into a landscape in many ways, from simple tree planting to rain gardens, swales, holding ponds and more complex bioretention systems that involve layers of filtering, she said. Some projects are also replacing asphalt with permeable paving that allows better water flow.

Glorieux said most of the green infrastructure water retention areas are designed to absorb the first 25 millimetres of rainfall, which means they should be able to handle about 95 per cent of rain events.

Emily Amon, the director of green infrastructure at Green Communities Canada, says the combination of increasingly severe weather events due to climate change and urbanization has led to “real losses on the landscape in terms of our ability to absorb that stormwater we receive.”


On July 13, Montreal received a month’s worth of rain in less than two hours, causing some 85 millimetres of rain to flood underpasses, overflow from sewers and force city officials to warn citizens to stay away from waterways due to possible contamination.

The non-profit Green Communities Canada works with other organizations to help municipalities create green infrastructure, including planting mini forests and gardens that absorb rain and removing the pavement from old parking lots. Across Canada, cities appear to be jumping on board.

Toronto has won praise for its bylaw requiring new developments greater than 2,000 square metres to have green roofs over part of their surfaces. The roofs soak up rainwater that otherwise would run off into sewers. Vancouver, Amon said, has implemented a rain city strategy that aims to integrate green infrastructure throughout planning decisions.


She said the Federation of Canadian Municipalities has started a “natural asset management program” that encourages cities to categorize and put a dollar value on their green infrastructure so it can be better managed — a strategy that was pioneered in Gibsons, B.C.

Guillaume Gregoire, an assistant professor who studies plant sciences and green infrastructure at Universite Laval in Quebec City, says green infrastructure does not really have any downside, but it has to occupy “a good part of the territory” in order to have a true effect.

He says green infrastructure can be expensive to install and “need a bit more maintenance than a simple sewer pipe,” which has made some municipalities more hesitant. However, he said comparative studies have shown that the cost over time is the same or less than that of upgrading sewer systems, even when the extra maintenance is taken into account.

All three experts say that in addition to stormwater management, the “sponge city” model brings other benefits, including increased biodiversity, reduced heat island effect, attractive public spaces and more exposure to nature, which contributes to better mental health.

Amon adds that green infrastructure can also contribute to more equitable neighbourhoods by adding food-bearing trees, culturally significant plants and more greenery to neighbourhoods that lack it.

“Green infrastructure is amazing, because it can be transformative in so many different ways,” she said.
This after decades of draining these very same swamps to make way for strip malls. Gawd city people are stupid.
 
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Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
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Or...

Earth’s Diminishing Magnetic Dipole Moment is Driving Global Carbon Dioxide Levels and Global WarmingDavid A. E. Vares1,2, Michael A. Persinger1,2,3
1Human Studies, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
2Behavioural Neuroscience Programs, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
3Biomolecular Sciences, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2015.68068 PDF HTML XML 5,761 Downloads 9,409 Views Citations
Abstract

Although there are powerful models that couple human activity with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and global warming, the relationships are still based upon correlations rather than causation. Consequently, there is always the probability of a third factor that produces both. Analyses of the diminishing magnetic dipole moment of the earth and the increased carbon dioxide levels and global temperature within the last 40 years revealed correlations of -0.99 and -0.90, respectively. This powerful association has been reported by other researchers. Why it has been ignored by the scientific community is not clear. The sources of the shift in average geomagnetic (magnetic dipole) intensity have not been identified but these relatively rapid decreases and increases have occurred historically with onsets of periods of warming and cooling, including glacier formation. If the long-time quasi-periodicity of the earth’s magnetic dipole moment is coupled to alterations in solar activity as the system moves around the galactic center, then attribution of elevated carbon dioxide-temperature to human sources rather than actual etiologies can be counterproductive to adaptation.
Heretic. He will be boiled alive in ice water for that.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Calgary researcher says sea ice in Antarctica lowest since 1986
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Oct 21, 2023 • 2 minute read

ROTHERA RESEARCH STATION, ANTARCTICA — A Calgary researcher, who has spent the last eight months in Antarctica studying sea ice, says he has seen first-hand how big an effect climate change has had in the region.


Vishnu Nandan, a post-doctoral associate with the University of Calgary, along with Robbie Mallett, from the University of Manitoba, have been studying ways to improve how radar satellites measure the thickness of Antarctic sea ice and snow.


The research is part of a British-based project called DEFIANT — Drivers and Effects of Fluctuations in sea Ice in the ANTarctic — which aims to deploy a state-of-the-art ground-based radar system that mimics the satellites in space.

“We actually came knowing we wouldn’t have a lot of sea ice, because it’s been really warm,” Nandan said in a phone interview from Rothera Research Station on Adelaide Island, nearly 1,900 kilometres south of the Falkland Islands.

“We came in where we had the lowest sea ice on record over the past many decades, so we didn’t have sea ice much and we had really thin ice in the winter.”


Nandan said the issue is that the area gets so much snow, sometimes up to a metre, that it’s difficult to get accurate satellite readings of snow and sea ice thickness.

They’ve been collecting data from the ground-based radar system to account for errors and correct satellite algorithms to produce accurate measurements critical for climate change projections.

Nandan did similar research a few years ago in the central Arctic Ocean, when he was on an icebreaker for a year in an extended examination of global warming from a vantage point close to the North Pole.

“Arctic sea ice has declined substantially — about 70 per cent over the past 30 to 40 years. When compared to that, the Antarctic has been stable, but over the past few years, since about 2016, we have seen a dramatic decline in sea ice in many regions across the Antarctic,” Nandan said.


“Right now it’s serious. It’s really bad. If you look at the overall area of the sea ice, the area is almost one million square kilometres less than the previous lowest which was in 1986.”

Although there has still been lots of snow, there were several days of rain, which is unusual, said Nandan. He added that the warm wind is preventing the ocean ice from freezing solidly.

He said his research, which is also supported by the University of Manitoba, is important considering what can happen with declining sea ice.

“Sea ice is white in colour and reflects most of the sunlight that is hitting it,” he said. “If you don’t have enough sea ice, that means there’s a lot of open ocean, which is actually absorbing most of the sunlight.”

In turn, Nandan said that makes the polar oceans warmer, which can affect both the ecosystem and the weather.

“You get more climate disasters like tornadoes, cyclones, extreme weather events like cloudbursts,” he said.

“It effects the ecosystem … from alligators, micoplanktons, to animals like seals who need sea ice for their habitat.”

Nandan has completed his stint in the Antarctic and will be returning to Calgary next month.
 
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Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Calgary researcher says sea ice in Antarctica lowest since 1986
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Oct 21, 2023 • 2 minute read

ROTHERA RESEARCH STATION, ANTARCTICA — A Calgary researcher, who has spent the last eight months in Antarctica studying sea ice, says he has seen first-hand how big an effect climate change has had in the region.


Vishnu Nandan, a post-doctoral associate with the University of Calgary, along with Robbie Mallett, from the University of Manitoba, have been studying ways to improve how radar satellites measure the thickness of Antarctic sea ice and snow.


The research is part of a British-based project called DEFIANT — Drivers and Effects of Fluctuations in sea Ice in the ANTarctic — which aims to deploy a state-of-the-art ground-based radar system that mimics the satellites in space.

“We actually came knowing we wouldn’t have a lot of sea ice, because it’s been really warm,” Nandan said in a phone interview from Rothera Research Station on Adelaide Island, nearly 1,900 kilometres south of the Falkland Islands.

“We came in where we had the lowest sea ice on record over the past many decades, so we didn’t have sea ice much and we had really thin ice in the winter.”


Nandan said the issue is that the area gets so much snow, sometimes up to a metre, that it’s difficult to get accurate satellite readings of snow and sea ice thickness.

They’ve been collecting data from the ground-based radar system to account for errors and correct satellite algorithms to produce accurate measurements critical for climate change projections.

Nandan did similar research a few years ago in the central Arctic Ocean, when he was on an icebreaker for a year in an extended examination of global warming from a vantage point close to the North Pole.

“Arctic sea ice has declined substantially — about 70 per cent over the past 30 to 40 years. When compared to that, the Antarctic has been stable, but over the past few years, since about 2016, we have seen a dramatic decline in sea ice in many regions across the Antarctic,” Nandan said.


“Right now it’s serious. It’s really bad. If you look at the overall area of the sea ice, the area is almost one million square kilometres less than the previous lowest which was in 1986.”

Although there has still been lots of snow, there were several days of rain, which is unusual, said Nandan. He added that the warm wind is preventing the ocean ice from freezing solidly.

He said his research, which is also supported by the University of Manitoba, is important considering what can happen with declining sea ice.

“Sea ice is white in colour and reflects most of the sunlight that is hitting it,” he said. “If you don’t have enough sea ice, that means there’s a lot of open ocean, which is actually absorbing most of the sunlight.”

In turn, Nandan said that makes the polar oceans warmer, which can affect both the ecosystem and the weather.

“You get more climate disasters like tornadoes, cyclones, extreme weather events like cloudbursts,” he said.

“It effects the ecosystem … from alligators, micoplanktons, to animals like seals who need sea ice for their habitat.”

Nandan has completed his stint in the Antarctic and will be returning to Calgary next month.
Actually, the ice in the North ebbs & flows all the time and has for centuries. Simply stating that it's "melting" is disingenuous, the same as stating that polar bears are becoming extinct when in fact they're thriving. It's all political & not based on science or facts.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
Actually, the ice in the North ebbs & flows all the time and has for centuries. Simply stating that it's "melting" is disingenuous, the same as stating that polar bears are becoming extinct when in fact they're thriving. It's all political & not based on science or facts.
Antarctic is the driest and windiest desert on Earth.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Plant-based meat, milk alternatives could cut emissions nearly a third: Study
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Oct 22, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read

Are you ready to sink your teeth into more plant-based burgers to help the environment?


According to a new study, cutting the world’s consumption of pork, chicken, beef and milk products by half could help reduce global greenhouse gas emissions 31% by 2050.


The study, published in the journal Nature Communications last month, also suggests the change in diet would virtually halt the loss of forests for farm use.

Currently, food sourced from animals accounts for less than 20% of the global food energy supply, but “are responsible for the majority of negative impacts on land use, water use, biodiversity, and greenhouse gas emissions in global food systems,” the study’s authors note.

Farming cattle involves cutting down forests to plant grain to feed them, which produces methane, a far worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.


“Methane has more than 80 times the warming power of carbon dioxide over the first 20 years after it reaches the atmosphere,” according to the Environmental Defense Fund. “Even though CO2 has a longer-lasting effect, methane sets the pace for warming in the near term.”

If consuming animal products is cut in half by mid-century, land used for agriculture would also decrease 12% instead of continuing to expand as the world’s population grows. Nitrogen used in farming would decrease as well, along with a 10% reduction in water use.

Researchers said the effects of increasing plant-based food in global diets would leave fewer people hungry, estimating 31 million more would be better fed by 2050.

The study noted interest in plant-based products has been increasing in recent years.

“Despite their novelty, as of 2020 they have already gained popularity, with plant-based alternatives accounting for 15% of the milk market in the U.S. and 1.4% and 1.3% of the meat markets in the U.S. and Germany, respectively,” the authors wrote.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,803
11,605
113
Low Earth Orbit
Farming cattle involves cutting down forests to plant grain to feed them, which produces methane, a far worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.
What trees? Who is cutting down tree to grow grain to feed cattle.

Cattle eat forage (plants) not grain. A burger would cost $50 if that were the case.