It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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I know you are trying to be funny. I do like the believe there is still a place on the political spectrum (not well populated mind you) called the middle. This is where I see myself. I probably lean right on some issues and left on others. But never to either extreme.
Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for monks.
As to this issue, I see lots of movement away from fossil fuels without anything to move to or any thought on the electrical grid requirements to do the move. We are doing stuff for the photoop without any real thought beyond the dogma behind it.
Easy answer. The market. People need more electrical power, companies build out generation and distribution capacity, people give them money for the power.

How'd "planning" work for the Soviet Union?
 
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pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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Ron in Regina

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Both sets of Grandparents had Heating Oil tanks still on their homes when I was a child (I had to ask what they where), but had been retrofitted to Natural Gas more than 50yrs ago for both sets.
Environment and climate change, a top Millennial issue when the Liberals took office, is now rapidly receding into the background. Just 23 per cent of Millennials named “climate change” as one of their top three political issues — the lowest result among any age demographic.

(An Angus Reid survey also found “cost of living” climbing to undisputed first place among priority issues for Canadian voters, with environment and climate change dropping to a distant fourth place behind “health care” and “housing affordability.”)
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Both sets of Grandparents had Heating Oil tanks still on their homes when I was a child (I had to ask what they where), but had been retrofitted to Natural Gas more than 50yrs ago for both sets.
Environment and climate change, a top Millennial issue when the Liberals took office, is now rapidly receding into the background. Just 23 per cent of Millennials named “climate change” as one of their top three political issues — the lowest result among any age demographic.

(An Angus Reid survey also found “cost of living” climbing to undisputed first place among priority issues for Canadian voters, with environment and climate change dropping to a distant fourth place behind “health care” and “housing affordability.”)
I hope they blame themselves.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Western Canada global hot spot over summer: Climate Central study
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 07, 2023 • 1 minute read

An analysis has found that Western Canada was one of the global hot spots in a summer that climate change made one of the warmest on record.


The extensive study by Climate Central concludes that Canada saw nine days of high temperatures that were made at least three times more likely by greenhouse gases.


It also says average temperatures in Canada during July and August were 1.5 degrees warmer than average — one of the highest increases in the world.

Climate Central uses peer-reviewed methods to attribute the contribution of climate change to daily temperatures around the world.

Its report follows news from the World Meteorological Organization that June through August was the warmest for that period since records began in 1940.
 

Taxslave2

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Western Canada global hot spot over summer: Climate Central study
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 07, 2023 • 1 minute read

An analysis has found that Western Canada was one of the global hot spots in a summer that climate change made one of the warmest on record.


The extensive study by Climate Central concludes that Canada saw nine days of high temperatures that were made at least three times more likely by greenhouse gases.


It also says average temperatures in Canada during July and August were 1.5 degrees warmer than average — one of the highest increases in the world.

Climate Central uses peer-reviewed methods to attribute the contribution of climate change to daily temperatures around the world.

Its report follows news from the World Meteorological Organization that June through August was the warmest for that period since records began in 1940.
Couldn't have anything to do with the massive arson attacks on BC forest industry, could it?
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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Western Canada global hot spot over summer: Climate Central study
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 07, 2023 • 1 minute read

An analysis has found that Western Canada was one of the global hot spots in a summer that climate change made one of the warmest on record.


The extensive study by Climate Central concludes that Canada saw nine days of high temperatures that were made at least three times more likely by greenhouse gases.


It also says average temperatures in Canada during July and August were 1.5 degrees warmer than average — one of the highest increases in the world.

Climate Central uses peer-reviewed methods to attribute the contribution of climate change to daily temperatures around the world.

Its report follows news from the World Meteorological Organization that June through August was the warmest for that period since records began in 1940.
Not here in Western Canada anyway, but maybe somewhere else in Western Canada?

This summer has been a roller coaster of two days of heat and four or five days of cool, and repeat… for the most part, here in the city that rhymes with fun.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Not here in Western Canada anyway, but maybe somewhere else in Western Canada?

This summer has been a roller coaster of two days of heat and four or five days of cool, and repeat… for the most part, here in the city that rhymes with fun.
Lots of Tstorm rain everywhere but here. It's still green.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Censorship over opinions concerning whether we are in a climate emergency, catastrophe, apocalypse or even worse has made headlines recently because of the well-known travails of Jordan Peterson, who has been ordered by the College of Psychologists of Ontario (CPO) to undergo re-education at the hands of a social media “expert” for an indefinite period and at his own expense.

The CPO reprimanded Peterson for, among other things, remarks he made on a Joe Rogan podcast concerning climate-change policy, a subject that bears no relationship to his clinical practice as a psychologist.

Many observers have pointed out the chilling effect of the CPO ruling: members of any professional association (engineers, lawyers, accountants, medical professionals, teachers, etc.) will now hesitate to speak up on matters of public interest, even if these have nothing whatsoever to do with their professional activities.

Even worse (if possible) have been the tactics used to discredit Peterson’s views. Consider an article by Josh Marcus in Britain’s Independent noting that Peterson supported his climate views by referring to a 2021 book (“Hot Talk, Cold Science”), one of whose co-authors, S. Fred Singer, was the founder of an organization that received some funding in the past from the Heartland Institute, which in turn received some funding in the past from Exxon.

Conclusion: Peterson’s views are therefore to be completely discounted. Worse than merely an ad hominem attack, this is guilt by extremely indirect association.

Moreover, Marcus failed to mention that Singer was a Princeton physics Ph.D., that his co-authors have Ph.D.s in atmospheric physics and climatology and that their book includes two forwards by Princeton physicists, one a former president of the National Academy of Sciences.

(Concerning the link with dirty fossil fuel money, the Heartland Institute notes, “When Exxon was a donor to Heartland, from 1998 to 2006, its contributions of about $50,000 never exceeded more than five percent of our annual budget.”)

Needless to say, Peterson’s views should not automatically be accepted because of the credentials of the authors he cited. On the other hand, they should not automatically be dismissed for the reasons the Independent invokes — even if they were true.

Like any propositions about science or public policy, they should be discussed and debated openly and publicly and evaluated on their merits. Peterson makes no claim to being a climate scientist. But intelligent, well-informed lay persons who have clearly done their homework must not be discouraged from participating in open debate. These days, however, censorship extends not only to intelligent lay persons such as Peterson but also to views that have passed peer review and been published in prestigious academic journals.

Two recent cases illustrate what some call the “censorship industrial complex.” See the above link for the two examples….

Science advances when scientists express clear hypotheses and test them against the data. It requires open debate. It does not advance by consensus or political pressure; in fact, it is blocked by political pressure and appeals to consensus.

Citizens are expected to vote concerning matters such as climate-change policies. They benefit from exposure to all sides of these issues. Those who would instead deny climate dissent need to recall a famous line from John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty: “He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that.”
 
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Dixie Cup

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Western Canada global hot spot over summer: Climate Central study
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Sep 07, 2023 • 1 minute read

An analysis has found that Western Canada was one of the global hot spots in a summer that climate change made one of the warmest on record.


The extensive study by Climate Central concludes that Canada saw nine days of high temperatures that were made at least three times more likely by greenhouse gases.


It also says average temperatures in Canada during July and August were 1.5 degrees warmer than average — one of the highest increases in the world.

Climate Central uses peer-reviewed methods to attribute the contribution of climate change to daily temperatures around the world.

Its report follows news from the World Meteorological Organization that June through August was the warmest for that period since records began in 1940.
And blah, blah, blah blah - I'm almost positive that it has gotten hotter many, many years ago. You can't simply go back 150 years & make the claim that we're responsible.

Where were we 10,000 years ago? Climate has ALWAYS changed & will continue to do so no matter how much money we provide in the pockets of the elitists who benefit from the grift.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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And blah, blah, blah blah - I'm almost positive that it has gotten hotter many, many years ago. You can't simply go back 150 years & make the claim that we're responsible.

Where were we 10,000 years ago? Climate has ALWAYS changed & will continue to do so no matter how much money we provide in the pockets of the elitists who benefit from the grift.
Sound like bullshit to me. It wasn't a hot summer.
 
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spaminator

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Scientists found the most intense heat wave ever recorded - in Antarctica
Temperatures in March are typically around -54C on the east coast near the Dome C. On March 18, 2022, temperatures peaked to -10C

Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Kasha Patel
Published Sep 25, 2023 • 4 minute read
Lone penguin on ice in Antarctica
Lone penguin on ice in Antarctica. Getty Images
In March 2022, temperatures near the eastern coast of Antarctica spiked 70 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius) above normal – making it the most intense recorded heat wave to occur anywhere on Earth, according to a recent study. At the time, researchers on-site were wearing shorts and some even removed their shirts to bask in the (relative) warmth. Scientists elsewhere said such a high in that region of the world was unthinkable.


“It was just very apparent that it was a remarkable event,” said Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, author of the study. “We found that temperature anomaly, the 39-degree temperature anomaly, that’s the largest anywhere ever measured anywhere in the world.”


Temperatures in March, marking a change into autumn on the continent, are typically around minus-54 degrees Celsius on the east coast near the Dome C. On March 18, 2022, temperatures peaked to minus-10 degrees Celsius. That’s warmer than even the hottest temperature recorded during the summer months in that region – “that in itself is pretty unbelievable,” said Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington.

In the new research, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth and his colleagues investigated how and why such an unimaginable heat wave could have occurred, especially at a time of the year when there is less sunlight. They found the extreme heat is largely part of Antarctica’s natural variability, though the warming climate did have some effect.


The seeds for the heat wave, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said, began with unusual winds. Typically, winds blow from west to east around Antarctica and help isolate the continent from warmer regions farther north, allowing it to stay cold. But just as occurs with heat waves in the United States, the winds meandered and allowed a warm mass of air from southern Australia to move to East Antarctica in just four days – “probably the first time that at least it’s happened that fast,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said.

The northerly winds also brought a lot of moisture, bringing significant snow, rain and melting on the eastern coast of the ice sheet.

At the same time, Antarctica was experiencing its lowest sea ice on record, though the team said their work suggests that did not appear to influence the heat wave.


Big swings in weather aren’t completely out of the ordinary in the polar regions, the study found. In an analysis of global weather station data and computer simulations, the team found the largest temperature changes from normal occur at high latitudes. Places like Europe or the United States’ Lower 48 never experience such anomalous heat waves.

There’s a basic reason the largest anomalies happen at these high latitudes, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said – there’s more cold air to remove near the ground. Typically, air becomes colder higher in the atmosphere. But some places – like at high latitudes with a lot of snow and ice – have colder air near the ground and warmer air above it, called an inversion layer. In these spots, a warm air mass can swoop in to displace the cold air and create warm weather. These warm events often happen during or around winter, when the inversion layers are the strongest.


“That’s what we saw for the Antarctic heat wave,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said. “These events sort of erode that inversion, you get rid of it.”

Meteorologist Jonathan Wille, who was not involved in the study, said he’s not surprised that this Antarctic heat wave registered as the largest observed temperature anomaly anywhere. After all, the Antarctic Plateau has some of the highest temperature variability in the world.

The complete role of climate change is still under investigation, although the new study asserts that the warmer atmosphere didn’t play a large role boosting temperatures. The team ran a suite of computer models running scenarios that included increased greenhouse gas emissions vs. a world that did not. They found climate change only increased the heat wave by 2 degrees Celsius. By the end of the century, climate change could boost such a heat wave by an additional 5 to 6 degrees Celsius.


“A 2C boost for a heatwave that was 39C above average means that this heat wave would have been record shattering without the climate change signal,” Wille, a researcher at ETH Zurich, wrote in an email.

But climate change could have had another effect the models didn’t test, such as the effect on the anomalous winds that brought the warm air mass to the continent in the first place. Wille said unusual tropical downpours in the weeks beforehand created an atmospheric circulation pattern that was never observed before – leading to the extreme heat.

“It’s possible that climate change influenced the atmospheric dynamics like the tropical convection anomalies that led to the heat wave, but this is very difficult to quantify these things,” Wille said.

Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said more heat waves like this in Antarctica in a warmer world could have dire effects on the ice sheet.

“If you add another five or six degrees on top of that, you’re starting to get close to the melting point,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said. If these events were to become more common in 50 or even 100 years, “this kind of event might trigger some impacts that maybe we didn’t have on our radar.”
GettyImages-1405555495[1].jpg
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
108,421
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Low Earth Orbit
Scientists found the most intense heat wave ever recorded - in Antarctica
Temperatures in March are typically around -54C on the east coast near the Dome C. On March 18, 2022, temperatures peaked to -10C

Author of the article:Washington Post
Washington Post
Kasha Patel
Published Sep 25, 2023 • 4 minute read
Lone penguin on ice in Antarctica
Lone penguin on ice in Antarctica. Getty Images
In March 2022, temperatures near the eastern coast of Antarctica spiked 70 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius) above normal – making it the most intense recorded heat wave to occur anywhere on Earth, according to a recent study. At the time, researchers on-site were wearing shorts and some even removed their shirts to bask in the (relative) warmth. Scientists elsewhere said such a high in that region of the world was unthinkable.


“It was just very apparent that it was a remarkable event,” said Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, author of the study. “We found that temperature anomaly, the 39-degree temperature anomaly, that’s the largest anywhere ever measured anywhere in the world.”


Temperatures in March, marking a change into autumn on the continent, are typically around minus-54 degrees Celsius on the east coast near the Dome C. On March 18, 2022, temperatures peaked to minus-10 degrees Celsius. That’s warmer than even the hottest temperature recorded during the summer months in that region – “that in itself is pretty unbelievable,” said Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington.

In the new research, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth and his colleagues investigated how and why such an unimaginable heat wave could have occurred, especially at a time of the year when there is less sunlight. They found the extreme heat is largely part of Antarctica’s natural variability, though the warming climate did have some effect.


The seeds for the heat wave, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said, began with unusual winds. Typically, winds blow from west to east around Antarctica and help isolate the continent from warmer regions farther north, allowing it to stay cold. But just as occurs with heat waves in the United States, the winds meandered and allowed a warm mass of air from southern Australia to move to East Antarctica in just four days – “probably the first time that at least it’s happened that fast,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said.

The northerly winds also brought a lot of moisture, bringing significant snow, rain and melting on the eastern coast of the ice sheet.

At the same time, Antarctica was experiencing its lowest sea ice on record, though the team said their work suggests that did not appear to influence the heat wave.


Big swings in weather aren’t completely out of the ordinary in the polar regions, the study found. In an analysis of global weather station data and computer simulations, the team found the largest temperature changes from normal occur at high latitudes. Places like Europe or the United States’ Lower 48 never experience such anomalous heat waves.

There’s a basic reason the largest anomalies happen at these high latitudes, Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said – there’s more cold air to remove near the ground. Typically, air becomes colder higher in the atmosphere. But some places – like at high latitudes with a lot of snow and ice – have colder air near the ground and warmer air above it, called an inversion layer. In these spots, a warm air mass can swoop in to displace the cold air and create warm weather. These warm events often happen during or around winter, when the inversion layers are the strongest.


“That’s what we saw for the Antarctic heat wave,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said. “These events sort of erode that inversion, you get rid of it.”

Meteorologist Jonathan Wille, who was not involved in the study, said he’s not surprised that this Antarctic heat wave registered as the largest observed temperature anomaly anywhere. After all, the Antarctic Plateau has some of the highest temperature variability in the world.

The complete role of climate change is still under investigation, although the new study asserts that the warmer atmosphere didn’t play a large role boosting temperatures. The team ran a suite of computer models running scenarios that included increased greenhouse gas emissions vs. a world that did not. They found climate change only increased the heat wave by 2 degrees Celsius. By the end of the century, climate change could boost such a heat wave by an additional 5 to 6 degrees Celsius.


“A 2C boost for a heatwave that was 39C above average means that this heat wave would have been record shattering without the climate change signal,” Wille, a researcher at ETH Zurich, wrote in an email.

But climate change could have had another effect the models didn’t test, such as the effect on the anomalous winds that brought the warm air mass to the continent in the first place. Wille said unusual tropical downpours in the weeks beforehand created an atmospheric circulation pattern that was never observed before – leading to the extreme heat.

“It’s possible that climate change influenced the atmospheric dynamics like the tropical convection anomalies that led to the heat wave, but this is very difficult to quantify these things,” Wille said.

Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said more heat waves like this in Antarctica in a warmer world could have dire effects on the ice sheet.

“If you add another five or six degrees on top of that, you’re starting to get close to the melting point,” Blanchard-Wrigglesworth said. If these events were to become more common in 50 or even 100 years, “this kind of event might trigger some impacts that maybe we didn’t have on our radar.”
View attachment 19445
What heat was waved? There is no "heat" at -10°

STOP FUCKING LYING!