It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
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Six consecutive months where it’s snowed, in the Southern Mainland of BC. Better throw another log on the Carbon Tax Fire.

Then Saskatchewan dodged the storm, but not the unseasonably cold weather. This is North Dakota to the south of us:
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…& Minnesota to the east of that:
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…& Manitoba where they are predicting 15-25cm of snow (6”-10”) in the southern part of the province… and it gets worse as you head into Northern Ontario:
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…& though it’s not too bad now after 4 PM in the afternoon where I stand, this is six hours to the south-east of me:
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IdRatherBeSkiing

Satelitte Radio Addict
May 28, 2007
14,606
2,358
113
Toronto, ON
You guys are talking to a bot/scammer who is trying to get his post count up so he can start his scamming. Identifiable by a reasonably correct syntax of an english sentence saying nothing.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Hundreds of thousands of people were without electricity in Quebec and Ontario, Ottawa’s light-rail transit system went down, and parts of Manitoba were readying for another round of winter on Wednesday as snow, rain and ice storms swept central and eastern Canada ahead of Easter weekend.

Roughly 780,000 customers were without power in Quebec on Wednesday evening, according to Hydro-Québec’s website. The vast majority of those were concentrated in Montreal and in the Montérégie and Outaouais regions in the province’s southwest. The outages hit roughly 17 per cent of Hydro-Québec’s 4½ million customers.

In Ontario, more than 120,000 Hydro One customers were without power late Wednesday afternoon. The company, which is Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution service provider, said crews were responding to outages in Ontario as quickly and safely as possible, but severe weather was slowing the response.

Environment and Climate Change Canada issued warnings for freezing rain for parts of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick on Wednesday.

The agency said Toronto could receive up to 60 millimetres of rain, while thunderstorms around Niagara, Windsor and Hamilton in Ontario could bring nickel-sized hail and wind gusts near 90 kilometres an hour.

Meanwhile, Environment Canada warned of storms in other parts of Ontario and southeast Manitoba, predicting a late season Colorado low could dump 15 to 25 centimetres of snow in Winnipeg, with winds reaching 70 kilometres an hour.

It also called for a blizzard to hit Sanikiluaq, Nunavut. Happy Easter!
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,600
6,962
113
B.C.
Hundreds of thousands of people were without electricity in Quebec and Ontario, Ottawa’s light-rail transit system went down, and parts of Manitoba were readying for another round of winter on Wednesday as snow, rain and ice storms swept central and eastern Canada ahead of Easter weekend.

Roughly 780,000 customers were without power in Quebec on Wednesday evening, according to Hydro-Québec’s website. The vast majority of those were concentrated in Montreal and in the Montérégie and Outaouais regions in the province’s southwest. The outages hit roughly 17 per cent of Hydro-Québec’s 4½ million customers.

In Ontario, more than 120,000 Hydro One customers were without power late Wednesday afternoon. The company, which is Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution service provider, said crews were responding to outages in Ontario as quickly and safely as possible, but severe weather was slowing the response.

Environment and Climate Change Canada issued warnings for freezing rain for parts of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick on Wednesday.

The agency said Toronto could receive up to 60 millimetres of rain, while thunderstorms around Niagara, Windsor and Hamilton in Ontario could bring nickel-sized hail and wind gusts near 90 kilometres an hour.

Meanwhile, Environment Canada warned of storms in other parts of Ontario and southeast Manitoba, predicting a late season Colorado low could dump 15 to 25 centimetres of snow in Winnipeg, with winds reaching 70 kilometres an hour.

It also called for a blizzard to hit Sanikiluaq, Nunavut. Happy Easter!
Best lower the carbon tax to get the weather back to normal .
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,219
11,359
113
Low Earth Orbit
Wait until the realize photons cause cancer.....

New Hydrogen Research Reminds Us Humanity Just Can't Win With Fuel Alternatives
Too much hydrogen in the sky could limit atmospheric breakdown of methane, researchers warn.

There is no perfect energy source, nothing that will power our vehicles without some kind of catch. Consider hydrogen. For decades it’s been propped up as a worthy alternative to oil, even if infrastructure-related hiccups seem to always hold it back from reaching its full potential. Nevertheless, there seems to be a bit of space left for hydrogen-powered vehicles even in a battery electric-dominated world. But new research indicates that hydrogen buildup could have adverse effects on the climate, not terribly unlike the fuel it’s meant to replace.

The study was conducted by Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. Hydrogen reacts with another molecule called hydroxyl radical (OH) that, on its own, typically reduces the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The researchers found that once a certain threshold of hydrogen emissions is surpassed, OH cannot do its job, leading to an overabundance of methane. From Sci Tech Daily:

The hydroxyl radical also reacts with hydrogen gas in the atmosphere. And since a limited amount of OH is generated each day, any spike in hydrogen emissions means that more OH would be used to break down hydrogen, leaving less OH available to break down methane. As a consequence, methane would stay longer in the atmosphere, extending its warming impacts.

Blah blah blah
 
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Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,743
1,662
113
Best lower the carbon tax to get the weather back to normal .
BC has certainly had an unusually long and cold winter. Snow every month for the last 5 months in the lower mainland, where some years get no snow worth mentioning.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
35,795
3,025
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Home runs are increasing thanks to climate change, study says
Each degree of warming is associated with about 95 more home runs per MLB season

Author of the article:Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
Brandon Sapienza
Published Apr 07, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

George Costanza made hitting home runs sound easy when he described it on Seinfeld: “Calculate the velocity, v, in relation to the trajectory, t, in which g, gravity, of course remains a constant. It’s not complicated.”


While the physics behind baseball may seem unalterable, higher temperatures reduce air density, which makes it likelier for a batted ball to fly farther. That means climate change is now influencing the game — and affecting the frequency of home runs, according to new research.


In a paper published Friday in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, researchers from Dartmouth College find that rising global temperatures have led to an increase in home runs in Major League Baseball games — particularly those played in non-domed stadiums — due to reduced air density.


More than 500 MLB home runs since 2010 can be attributed to “historical warming,” the authors write. “Several hundred additional home runs per season are projected due to future warming.”


The team behind the study — led by Christopher Callahan, a doctoral candidate in geography — determined that a 1°C increase in the daily high temperature on the day a baseball game is played (in a non-domed stadium) increases the number of home runs by 1.96%. In games played in the early afternoon, the effect is larger: 2.4%.

Global warming of 2°C above preindustrial levels, the upper target set by the Paris Agreement to avoid the most cataclysmic impacts, would translate to several more home runs per year each at Chicago’s Wrigley Field, Detroit’s Comerica Park and Target Field in Minneapolis, according to the research.

“I was inspired to work on this study as a baseball fan, wondering about how climate change will affect the things I care about,” Callahan told Bloomberg Green. “I knew that this link between home runs and temperature had been proposed previously by folks like Dr. Alan Nathan, but I was curious about whether it could be seen in the large-scale data, as well as what the role of climate change might be.”


Callahan and his colleagues looked at 100,000 Major League Baseball games and 220,000 individual batted balls, and aimed to control for other potential drivers such as precipitation, wind speed and the use of advanced equipment and performance-enhancing drugs in the game.

Jana Houser, an associate professor of meteorology at Ohio State University who was not involved in the research, said that the relationship between heat, lower air density and the trajectory of a baseball is clear. “Warmer temperatures are associated with lower-density air,” she said in an email. “As such, a flying object (like a ball) will encounter lower molecular resistance in the air as a result of it having to move through fewer air molecules. This would imply that for an equal amount of force applied to the ball, it will go further in warmer air temperatures than it will in colder temperatures.”


Each degree of global warming is associated with about 95 more home runs per baseball season. Warming on a high-emissions pathway would cause players across the MLB to hit an additional 192 home runs per year by 2050 and a further 467 by 2100, the authors project.

“While changes in technology and player skill will undoubtedly shape the projections we show here, our results highlight that MLB will need to contend with climate change’s influence on baseball performance,” the authors write. “Steadily rising home runs may alter the incentives for player acquisition, offensive and defensive strategy, and public perception and engagement with the game, with consequences for the business of baseball and its on-field play.”

They propose that MLB make changes including holding all day games at night, as that would minimize the impact of daily high temperatures. Doming existing stadiums would “dampen” the effects of climate change as it pertains to home runs, they write.

“Climate change is reshaping our daily lives in pervasive ways,” Callahan said. “It’s not just heat waves and hurricanes — the ways that we play and have fun are also going to be impacted. While these impacts are often subtle at present, they will only grow stronger as long as climate change continues.”
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan

It’s annual meeting time for Canada’s chartered banks, with two more to come. Bank investors should hope that next week’s Bank of Montreal and Toronto-Dominion Bank events do not duplicate the activist-driven political storm that took place last week at the Royal Bank of Canada’s meeting in Saskatoon.

The complete audio-visual webcast of the RBC annual meeting is available for viewing and listening on the bank’s website, a three-hour extravaganza dominated by environmental activists from Canada and the United States along with various Indigenous groups.

Aside from a brief nine-minute annual address to shareholders from chief executive Dave McKay, and the moderator’s time consumed by the bank’s chair, Kathleen Taylor, the meeting was a non-stop horror show of outrageous claims, vicious comments and personal insults directed at McKay and Taylor.

What attracts the media to the RBC ranking as a fossil fuel funder is that it seems to contradict the bank’s self-declared position as a champion of the global climate push to Net Zero carbon emissions.

By self-positioning as a Net Zero crusader, the bank has set itself up as the prime corporate target for green activists and media criticism. That’s what happened last week at the bank’s annual meeting. The rest of this goat rodeo at the above link.
 
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