COVID-19 'Pandemic'

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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"Covid" stands for "certification of vaccination identification" and the 19 is "AI" in numerology. The vaccine is an operating system that can alter your DNA.
Makes your body an antenna for 5G.

Well, I'm booked for the vaccine. My torturous and harrowing process was signing up 10 weeks ago. I got the call today.

Damn, I love the VA!
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
45,080
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83
Washington DC
Woman dies from brain hemorrhage in Japan days after vaccine, but link uncertain
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 02, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
People wearing face masks walk past a closed shop along the Takeshita shopping street on Feb. 28, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan.
People wearing face masks walk past a closed shop along the Takeshita shopping street on Feb. 28, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. PHOTO BY YUICHI YAMAZAKI /Getty Images
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TOKYO — A Japanese a woman in her 60s died from a brain hemorrhage three days after receiving a Pfizer coronavirus vaccination, the health ministry said on Tuesday, adding that there may not be a link between the two.

The woman was vaccinated on Friday and is suspected to have suffered a brain hemorrhage three days later, on Monday, it said. It was Japan’s first reported death following a vaccination.


“The brain hemorrhage that is suspected as a cause is relatively common among people from their 40s to their 60s, and at this time, based on examples overseas, there does not seem to be a link between brain hemorrhages and the coronavirus vaccine,” the ministry quoted Tomohiro Morio, a doctor advising the government, as saying.

“It may be a coincidental case, but there is a need to gather more information and make an assessment in upcoming working groups.”


Pfizer officials in Japan were not immediately available for comment. Pfizer said in November the efficacy of its vaccine was consistent across age and ethnic groups, and that there were no major side effects, a sign that the immunization could be employed broadly around the world.

Global health authorities have praised the fast development of safe and effective COVID vaccines, but have warned people with serious underlying health conditions to take medical advice first.

Japan became the last member of the Group of Seven leading industrialized nations to begin its vaccination drive, on Feb. 17.

It has so far received three shipments of vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech.

Japan officially approved Pfizer’s vaccine last month, the first such approval in the country as it steps up efforts to tame infections in the run-up to the Summer Olympics.
She had co-morbidities.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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As economy recovers, insolvencies will surely rise
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Publishing date:Mar 02, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
According to Statistics Canada, things were not ideal even before COVID, with 30% of Canadians believing they were over-indebted in 2019. Then came the pandemic.
According to Statistics Canada, things were not ideal even before COVID, with 30% of Canadians believing they were over-indebted in 2019. Then came the pandemic. PHOTO BY ISTOCK /GETTY IMAGES
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How much debt have Canadians taken on to survive during COVID?

And with the end of the pandemic in sight — sort of — what will happen next?

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According to Statistics Canada, things were not ideal even before COVID, with 30% of Canadians believing they were over-indebted in 2019. Then came the pandemic.

At the end of 2020, Douglas Hoyes of Hoyes, Michalos & Associates, a Licensed Insolvency Trustee, published an excellent summary of household debt and COVID-19.

Insolvency filings went up at the beginning of the year, but 2020 finished with record lows, despite lockdowns and layoffs. Debt was deferred.

Going into the pandemic, Canada’s debt-to-income ratio was 180.4%. The average consumer owed almost $30,000 in non-mortgage debt.

Insolvencies were rising and had been since the end of 2018.

When COVID hit, the federal government held off financial chaos with CERB and wage subsidies, income supports that helped an estimated 50% of adult Canadians.

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People deferred payments on everything from mortgages and credit cards to car loans and commercial rents.

With courts closed and debt collectors sidelined by COVID, everything was put on hold.

Insolvencies reached a 20-year low. (Alas, Statistics Canada notes that non-mortgage loans have increased steadily since May of 2020 and will soon be back to pre-pandemic levels.)

But deferrals are coming to an end, and government supports will not last forever. The economy is not predicted to be back in full swing until late this year or 2022; in the meantime, insolvencies will start to rise.

“Insolvencies will return as the economy recovers. It seems counter-intuitive to many, but if you don’t have an income or assets that can be seized by creditors, there is no need to file insolvency,” said Hoyes in his 2020 summary.

“Until economic growth is no longer driven primarily by consumer spending paid for with debt, until more Canadians can stop living paycheque to paycheque and using credit to survive, consumer insolvencies will inevitably return,” Hoyes added.

Asked to do a little crystal-ball gazing for the future, Hoyes said there are two schools of thought at the moment.

One is that with the vaccine and most people inoculated by Labour Day, we’ll quickly get back to normal. The pandemic will prove to have been a temporary blip.

“I do not subscribe to that theory,” said Hoyes.

“Yes, with the vaccine things will eventually get back to normal, but the world has fundamentally changed. Your favourite restaurant? It’s not reopening. Maybe not that nail salon or small fitness studio either. Others may replace them, but not to the same degree,” he said.

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For some workers, then, change will be huge.

“For a 60-year-old chef, life is not going back to normal. That chef, if he used credit cards to survive the last year, might be one of my clients,” Hoyes said.

On the other hand, said Hoyes, if that chef retires, nobody can garnishee his wages because he won’t have any.

“People file for bankruptcy or do a proposal to get protection from their creditors. They do so because they’re afraid their wages will be garnisheed or they’ll be sued, or they’ll lose their house, ” Hoyes said.

With no wages and no house (i.e. nothing to lose) you likely wouldn’t file. And creditors have to take action within two years of when payments stopped.

“And the courts are still mostly closed and collection agents are still working from home. A lot of the big banks may decide, ‘What’s the point?’

“There will be fewer clients in my line of work,” Hoyes said.

As the economy recovers, Hoyes said it’ll be tough on people in their 50s and 60s who are not quite ready for retirement.

And tough on young people just finishing university, he said. A lot of experience will be lost in the way of hands-on learning and mentoring because of the way the world has changed.

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People who’ve been deferring debt have more to think about and are potentially more at risk, said Hoyes.

Certainly, many Canadians, mostly middle income, will feel the debt impact of COVID-19 for years to come. Financially, “the guy in the middle will suffer most.That chef who used to earn $3000 a month is now getting 1800 on EI.”

And so his debts pile up.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Woman went on shopping spree with COVID bailout money for previously closed business
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Mar 02, 2021 • 23 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble6 Comments
COVID fraud poster
COVID fraud poster. PHOTO BY SCREENGRAB /The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of North Carolina
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Take the money and run.

That’s what the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of North Carolina alleges a woman did with $149,000 in COVID-19 business relief loan money, according to People.

Jasmine Johnnae Clifton, 24, used to have a clothing store, but it apparently had closed before the COVID-19 pandemic started. Clifton allegedly took the relief money and took off on a shopping spree.

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She appeared in court on Monday after being charged with two counts of fraud for using a business that has been disbanded to obtain relief funds via a Small Business Administration loan, according to a release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of North Carolina.

The release said Clifton, who lives in Charlotte, applied last year for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan — which is meant to aid businesses affected by the ongoing pandemic — stating that her online clothing business, Jazzy Jas, needed help. But the business had closed up shop earlier.

Clifton allegedly applied with false information about revenues and a “fraudulent tax document.” She was approved and given the money. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said she allegedly used the cash at a number of stores, including Nordstrom, Ikea, Louis Vuitton, Best Buy and Diamond stores.

She had previously been indicted by a grand jury on charges of wire fraud in relation to a disaster benefit, and fraud in connection with major disaster or emergency benefits on Feb. 17, according to the release.

Clifton could face up to 30 years in prison for each of the charges. She was released on bond after her court appearance.
 

taxme

Electoral Member
Feb 11, 2020
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Sweden bans face masks. Turkey never forced anyone to wear masks. Florida and South Dakota do not force their citizen's to wear masks. If this virus is so dangerous there should be hundreds of people dying in the streets of those places mentioned. It's all horse chit, man. :cool:

Great news coming out of Texas and Mississippi. Both states have now lifted all their tyrannical Covid restrictions. Masks, social distancing and lock downs are pretty much all gone now. The citizen's of those two states have now got their good old normal life and freedom back. It is off with the face diaper masks for good. Burn them all. Lol.

Of course, there are some of those leftist liberal crybaby dictator democrats in some of those blue states that are whining like hell now and are predicting that people are now going to die by the thousands in Texas and Mississippi. Those buffoons are now in a state of fear and panic themselves that they may not be able to hang onto their power and control over their people much longer if their citizen's start to demand an end to their enslavement from these communist globalist tyrannical radical politicians. I say good riddance to those bad blue state politician rubbish.

Now, can we all look forward to the day soon where one of our so called conservative leaders in some Canadian province manages to find some balls to do the same thing here in Canada? I think that once this ball starts to roll in one province nothing will be able to stop it after that. All it takes is for one conservative leader in some conservative province to do so. Come on, man, let's take those silly looking face masks off your faces and start breathing in once again 100% pure oxygen. Works for me!
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Contagious Brazil COVID-19 variant evades immunity, scientists warn
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kate Kelland
Publishing date:Mar 02, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble5 Comments
Health workers transport a man, who, according to his wife, is suffering with COVID-19 symptoms, at 28 de Agosto hospital, in Manaus, Brazil, Jan. 14, 2021.
Health workers transport a man, who, according to his wife, is suffering with COVID-19 symptoms, at 28 de Agosto hospital, in Manaus, Brazil, Jan. 14, 2021. PHOTO BY BRUNO KELLY /Reuters
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LONDON — A highly transmissible COVID-19 variant that emerged in Brazil and has now been found in at least 20 countries can re-infect people who previously recovered from the disease, scientists said on Tuesday.

In a study of the mutant virus’s emergence and its spread in the Amazon jungle city of Manaus, the scientists said the variant – known as P.1 – has a “unique constellation of mutations” and had very rapidly become the dominant variant circulating there.


Out of 100 people in Manaus who had previously recovered from infection with the coronavirus, “somewhere between 25 and 61 of them are susceptible to re-infection with P.1,” said Nuno Faria, a virus expert at Imperial College London, who co-led the research which has not yet been peer reviewed.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

People wearing face masks walk past a closed shop along the Takeshita shopping street on Feb. 28, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan.
Woman dies from brain hemorrhage in Japan days after vaccine, but link uncertain
Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 needs better promotion: experts

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The scientists estimated that P.1 was 1.4 to 2.2 times more transmissible than the initial form of the virus.

Speaking to a media briefing about the findings, Nuno said it was too early to say whether the variant’s ability to evade immunity from previous infections meant that vaccines also would offer reduced protection against it.


“There’s no concluding evidence really to suggest at this point that the current vaccines won’t work against P.1,” Faria said. “I think (the vaccines) will at least protect us against disease, and possibly also against infection.”

Scientists around the world are on guard against new mutated forms of the coronavirus that could spread more easily, or be harder to fend off with existing vaccines.

The research, conducted with scientists at Brazil’s São Paulo and Britain’s Oxford universities, suggested that the P.1 variant had probably emerged in Manaus in early November 2020.

The first infection with it was identified on Dec. 6, Faria said. “We then looked at how rapidly P.1 overtook other lineages, and we found that the proportion of P.1 grew from zero to 87% in about eight weeks.”
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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SCREAM, NOT SWAB: Dutch inventor hopes he discovered new COVID-19 test
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Toby Sterling and Esther Verkaik
Publishing date:Mar 04, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Young African American man spitting while rhyming
PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /Getty Images
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AMSTERDAM — A Dutch inventor has come up with what he hopes could be a potentially faster and easier method to screen for coronavirus infections.

Instead of unpleasant nasal swab tests, Peter van Wees asks participants to step into an airlocked cabin and to scream, or sing. An industrial air purifier collects all the particles emitted, which are then analyzed for the virus.


“If you have coronavirus and are infectious and “yelling and screaming you are spreading tens of thousands of particles which contain coronavirus,” Van Wees said.

Van Wees, a serial entrepreneur, has set up his booth next to a coronavirus testing center on the outskirts of Amsterdam to try his invention out on people who have just been tested.

“It’s always very nice to scream, when nobody can hear you though,” said Soraya Assoud, 25, who needed proof of a negative coronavirus test for a trip to Spain.

Van Wees says that although lots of small particles from the person’s clothes and breath are detected, an infection shows up as a cluster around the size of the coronavirus. The process takes about three minutes.

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The virus is identified by its size using a nanometre-scale sizing device.


He sees the machine as a potentially useful screening tool at concerts, airports, schools or offices.

Spokesman Geert Westerhuis of the Netherlands’ National Institute for Health (RIVM), which is not involved in the project, said it is looking at an array of testing strategies and would welcome a fast, functioning test that was highly accurate. But “how this apparatus works — we can’t estimate it because we know too little about it,” he said. A breath test requiring the participant to blow into a tube was approved last month by health authorities in Amsterdam, but it has not yet been rolled out nationally due to troubles with “false negatives.”

Van Wees is working with a private company to marshal evidence for his strategy.

Assoud, on her way to Spain, said either way, the experience in Van Wees’s machine had been pleasant.

“I think it’s a good way of meditation as well … it’s fun!”
 

Blackleaf

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Oct 9, 2004
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7 Million Brits 🇬🇧 Kung Flu FREE Areas 🤦‍♂️ Gov Advice: Wear Glasses & Don’t Drop One 🤬 💨

You couldn’t make this up!

 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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🤬 Jersey Police Lost Their Minds 🎥 Mincing 👮‍♂️ Coppers 🚓 Dance Routine For TikTok 🤦‍♂️

Bergerac wouldn't be happy with this.