CDN-Economy & Related Factors

B00Mer

Trump 2024!!!
Sep 6, 2008
37,354
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Canada
www.DFWClassifieds.com

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
20,769
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B.C.
No problem, I have suddenly decided to push my tech company into Alberta..

Alberta injects additional $5-million into tech startup fund

During Covid-19 the government has been really generous with their money.. ;)
Good luck . An educated work force and technical infrastructure should help . If your product is feasible you have a chance . A wish and dream is only that until you have the chance . Hope the product is desired.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
Great news that Oshawa is back in the GM plan. Guessing it cost the government an arm and a leg but we have plenty.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
Trudeau is loving everyone zoned in on the U.S. election. Almost as good as the prorogue. Only three more years and then he can cash in on the golden pension for life. Somehow that doesn't seem right.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,261
234
63
Regina, Saskatchewan
Trudeau is loving everyone zoned in on the U.S. election. Almost as good as the prorogue. Only three more years and then he can cash in on the golden pension for life. Somehow that doesn't seem right.
It would seem somewhat more right if their golden pension was pinned to a ratio of the different in the national debt between them entering & leaving Parliament. National debt goes up & their pension goes down, and National debt goes down so their pension goes up. It would be an incentive to treat tax dollars like real money instead of an abstract concept....& a REAL change in lowering National debt (not the Paul Martin sleight of hand downloading debt to the provinces sort of stankiness) would translate into real gains in their pensions like a bonus. Something like 300000:1 so that a decrease of 3,000,000,000 in National debt translates to an increase of $10,000/annum in their pensions, & vise versa.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
It would seem somewhat more right if their golden pension was pinned to a ratio of the different in the national debt between them entering & leaving Parliament. National debt goes up & their pension goes down, and National debt goes down so their pension goes up. It would be an incentive to treat tax dollars like real money instead of an abstract concept....& a REAL change in lowering National debt (not the Paul Martin sleight of hand downloading debt to the provinces sort of stankiness) would translate into real gains in their pensions like a bonus. Something like 300000:1 so that a decrease of 3,000,000,000 in National debt translates to an increase of $10,000/annum in their pensions, & vise versa.

Wishful thinking Ron.

They need to eliminate the money incentive to be a politician all together imo. My MP is 22 years old and earning a base salary of $175,000. His school chums are working for $15/ hr. Would be curious what is on his to do list for today. Guaranteed nothing that would ever make a difference.

Politicians should be paid the average wage of all Canadians. A better class of politicians would emerge over time.

They'll fight that one tooth and nail. Always enjoyed listening to the explanation that the compensation is the equivalent of private industry.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
20,769
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B.C.
Wishful thinking Ron.

They need to eliminate the money incentive to be a politician all together imo. My MP is 22 years old and earning a base salary of $175,000. His school chums are working for $15/ hr. Would be curious what is on his to do list for today. Guaranteed nothing that would ever make a difference.

Politicians should be paid the average wage of all Canadians. A better class of politicians would emerge over time.

They'll fight that one tooth and nail. Always enjoyed listening to the explanation that the compensation is the equivalent of private industry.
We need to pay them well so good people will run , was what I was always told . It seems to me the more we pay the poorer the quality and worse results .
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
96,901
2,829
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Moccasin Flats
It's the Golden Parachute Pension that should go.

$175K is on par for someone who is on call 24/7, working away from home for months at a time and carrying two households.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
It's the Golden Parachute Pension that should go.
$175K is on par for someone who is on call 24/7, working away from home for months at a time and carrying two households.

The only people that don't think $175,000 is too much are the government employees because they all know someone making twice as much.

When I search average income of Canadians they keep throwing out median numbers but it looks like it is under $50,000.

The $175,000 is only the tip of the iceberg for those away from home months on end. That's the life of sitting on airplanes with $250 hotels and fine meals befitting to such important people.

Second residence if paid for at all is only a tax deduction. These people are not dumb.

Slice one third and you would never notice except they always cut the worker bees first.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
BMO reporting a $2 billion Q1 profit. Not bad for an economy under lockdown.

Too much money leaving the economy in the form of profit imo. All in close to $50 B / yr.
It's almost the kind of thing that government should be working to protect Canadians from.

Yes banks loan their money for investment but do very little investing themselves in infrastructure or anything tangible to stimulate work for others.

Government too caught up in how cool am I to have such a good job to notice.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
96,901
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It's almost the kind of thing that government should be working to protect Canadians from.

Yes banks loan their money for investment but do very little investing themselves in infrastructure or anything tangible to stimulate work for others.

Government too caught up in how cool am I to have such a good job to notice.
They buy bonds that fund infrastructure.
 
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bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
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They buy bonds that fund infrastructure.
It's a tricky thing.

The bonds are collateral and come with a price. Bonus for the banks with municipalities is that they use the money so poorly they always need more and can raise taxes at will to cover costs. Any significant federally funded infrastructure project is almost guaranteed to be a financial fiasco. Banks are never on the hook or at risk of not being paid. End of the day, once you pay the bank back you have nothing tangible to show for their services. It's a bit slimy imo.

RBC announcing a $3.85 billion profit for Q1 is crazy and you know they have the best accountants working on their books so who knows what slides by. Most of that money is all headed out of the country. It is a significant exit of capital from our economy imo.
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,447
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70% of small biz drowning in average debt of $170Gs: CFIB
Across the whole economy, the debut totals $135 billion, up from the CFIB’s previous estimate of $117 billion in July 2020

Author of the article:Jane Stevenson
Publishing date:Feb 25, 2021 • 21 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Businesswoman closing her business activity due to covid-19 lockdown. Owner with surgical mask close the doors of her store due to quarantine coronavirus damage. Close up sign of bankrupt business due to the effect of COVID-19 pandemic.
Businesswoman closing her business activity due to covid-19 lockdown. Owner with surgical mask close the doors of her store due to quarantine coronavirus damage. Close up sign of bankrupt business due to the effect of COVID-19 pandemic.
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The latest statistics about small business debt in Canada during COVD-19 are pretty devastating.

A new report by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) says seven in 10 small business owners are facing an average debt now of almost $170,000 each.

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Across the whole economy, the debut totals $135 billion, up from the CFIB’s previous estimate of $117 billion in July 2020.


“Over the last six months, the average debt taken on by small businesses to deal with COVID-19 has grown significantly,” said CFIB’s executive vice-president Laura Jones in a statement.

“While many businesses had previously reopened and were attempting to regain lost sales, the second wave and the restrictions that came with it are putting a massive wrench in an already slow recovery for small businesses.”

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A closed sign is seen in the window of a small business.
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The CFIB’s Your Voice Survey was an online poll taken by 3,554 small business owners in Canada from Feb. 4 to 8 this month.

The report also says of those that have taken on debut, 76% of them will need more than a year to repay it and 11% indicating they may not be able to repay it at all while the hospitality sector was the most likely to take on debt with 91% indicating so.

Four in ten businesses also said it would be at least a year from now, if not longer, for them to return to normal profit levels, not including any debt repayment.


“Small businesses need our support through this challenging time,” said CFIB research analyst and lead report author Taylor Matchett in a statement.

“We must also keep in mind that businesses are much more fragile now than at the beginning of the pandemic, and every effort should be made to keep businesses open while managing the health implications of the virus.”

For comparison purposes, a probability sample with the same number of respondents would have a margin of error of +/-1.6%, 19 times out of 20, the federation said.

jstevenson@postmedia.com
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
566
409
63
Fri., February 26, 2021, 11:15 a.m. ·1 min read




OTTAWA — The federal government ran a deficit of $248.2 billion through the first nine months of its 2020-21 fiscal year as spending soared due to the pandemic.
The result for the April-to-December period compared with a deficit of $11 billion in the same period a year earlier.
The government says in its fiscal monitor that the unprecedented shift in the government’s financial results reflects the severe deterioration in the economy and the government’s response plan to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Revenue was $207.7 billion for the April-to-December period, down from $246 billion, as tax and other revenue fell.
Meanwhile, program spending, excluding net actuarial losses, rose to $428.9 billion from $230.5 billion in the same period a year earlier, due in large part to the many programs established to help people and businesses during the pandemic.
Public debt charges fell to $15.4 billion compared with $18.4 billion a year earlier, while net actuarial losses increased to $11.5 billion from $8.1 billion.
 

taxme

Electoral Member
Feb 11, 2020
828
183
43
Fri., February 26, 2021, 11:15 a.m. ·1 min read




OTTAWA — The federal government ran a deficit of $248.2 billion through the first nine months of its 2020-21 fiscal year as spending soared due to the pandemic.
The result for the April-to-December period compared with a deficit of $11 billion in the same period a year earlier.
The government says in its fiscal monitor that the unprecedented shift in the government’s financial results reflects the severe deterioration in the economy and the government’s response plan to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Revenue was $207.7 billion for the April-to-December period, down from $246 billion, as tax and other revenue fell.
Meanwhile, program spending, excluding net actuarial losses, rose to $428.9 billion from $230.5 billion in the same period a year earlier, due in large part to the many programs established to help people and businesses during the pandemic.
Public debt charges fell to $15.4 billion compared with $18.4 billion a year earlier, while net actuarial losses increased to $11.5 billion from $8.1 billion.
I do believe that comrade Turdeau is trying to bankrupt this country. This buffoon has gone mad in the head and he is trying to take us all there with him. This fool needs to go before we all start to find ourselves looking for a spot in some park to sleep in a tent at night. Sadly, pretty much all of our dear leaders appear to be wanting to go along with this fool. While these fools get to keep their day job there are many people out there that have lost their jobs. But ask those bunch of buffoons if they really care. If they did care they would not be blowing our tax dollars like they are doing today. What is worse is that we the sheeple let them get away with this waste of our tax dollars. I guess that we are the ones who are the real nuts here. The politicians are just taking advantage of our nutiness. :rolleyes:
 

taxme

Electoral Member
Feb 11, 2020
828
183
43
I do believe that comrade Turdeau is trying to bankrupt this country. This buffoon has gone mad in the head and he is trying to take us all there with him. This fool needs to go before we all start to find ourselves looking for a spot in some park to sleep in a tent at night. Sadly, pretty much all of our dear leaders appear to be wanting to go along with this fool. While these fools get to keep their day job there are many people out there that have lost their jobs. But ask those bunch of buffoons if they really care. If they did care they would not be blowing our tax dollars like they are doing today. What is worse is that we the sheeple let them get away with this waste of our tax dollars. I guess that we are the ones who are the real nuts here. The politicians are just taking advantage of our nutiness. :rolleyes:
I just found out today on The Rebel that our dear so called BC health official pro globalist comrade Bonnie Henry Poo is making a salary of $360.000 a year. That is totally obscene. Bonnie Poo is making more money than Premier Horgan of BC is making. Wtf? It's no wonder she keeps coming up with more ways of try to keep this scamdemic going and keep her useless job. Maybe Bonnie Poo bought some pretty expensive property somewhere and wants to pay it off before she finally gets fired.
 
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