British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for.

EagleSmack

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Feb 16, 2005
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

Blackleaf there is no possible way that the Boy Leading a Horse photo could have been taken like that.

Once again, in early photography the subject had to sit perfectly still. How can a horse and boy stand still for 1 minute in that pose never mind the 8 hours they would have had to to create that image.

It is a fraud.
 

EagleSmack

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Feb 16, 2005
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

Oh... and the WWW was created by no other than Al Gore. That is what he said. :lol:
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit

I think not said:
Haggis McBagpipe said:
Blackleaf said:
So, if you think about it, around 4 or 5 people (all British) may have flown BEFORE the Wright Brothers -

The Wright Bros were not the first to achieve flight, but they were the first to achieve powered controlled flight, which is, after all, what aviation is all about. There were several people who flew gliders before the Wright's first powered flight, including the Wrights themselves, but powered and controlled is the defining factor here.

Haggis is correct, the key words here being powered AND controlled. The Wright Bros. developed their airplane in stages, first the had to achieve flight (as in gliding), then they focused on power and finally their biggest obstacle was control.

But they weren't the first to fly. I think actually becoming the first to fly a heavier than air vehicle is a bigger achievement than actually controlling one once it's in the air.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: RE: British inventions th

I think not said:
Blackleaf said:
The Scotsman John Paul Jones invented the US Navy. He was born in Dumfriesshire in 1747.

John Jones was a naval hero dude, he didn't invent the navy, how can anyone "invent" a navy when there have been navies for thousands of years. :roll:

He invented the US Navy. The US has only been around since 1776.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit

EagleSmack said:
Blackleaf there is no possible way that the Boy Leading a Horse photo could have been taken like that.

Once again, in early photography the subject had to sit perfectly still. How can a horse and boy stand still for 1 minute in that pose never mind the 8 hours they would have had to to create that image.

It is a fraud.

The photo is NOT a fraud.


The grainy image of a boy leading a horse was taken by French photographic pioneer Joseph Niepce in 1825.

The 6in by 4in photo is due to be auctioned by Sotheby's in Paris.

Philippe Garner of Sotheby's said: "This image and its accompanying correspondence oblige us to rewrite those crucial first stages of the history of photography."

It was previously thought he produced the first permanent photograph in 1826.

Niepce created his photo of an engraving using a technique called heliography, where light is used to project an image on to a photo-sensitive surface.

The photo lay undiscovered in a French collection until recently without its significance being realised.

http://www.optics.arizona.edu/nofziger/UNVR195a/Class9/WEPhoto.htm

The photo was auctioned at Sotheby's. Considering that you're an antiques and photography expert, maybe you should contact Paris Sotheby's and tell them that they are stupid.
 

Daz_Hockey

Council Member
Nov 21, 2005
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RE: British inventions th

Al Gore invented the internet?.....lol yep, and U5711 took the ultra machine and broke the enigma lol

no, trust me, it was Sir Timothy Berners-Lee who came up with the algorithm and code work for the "Enquire within" search criteria that has been developed and what is now known as the "world wide web".

we of course all know that it was couple of ARPAnets that started the whole thing and they were an american invention.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: RE: British inventions th

Daz_Hockey said:
from the English point of view yes....it becomes more complicated than that you see, a lot of scottish, welsh or Irish nationals would tend to have a differing view, of which I would expect my friend (who proffesses his scottishness al the time) to be at least a little symperthetic....


nah he wasnt lol

Don't be stupid. The Scots were as imperialistic (if not MORE imperialistic) as the English. In fact, it was mainly the Scots who set out and colonised various parts of the world to bring them into the Empire whilst the English mostly stayed at home and counted all the money coming in.

Before Scotland joined the Union in 1707, it had imperialistic ambitions of its own. Scotland tried to to found a colony on the Isthmus of Panama in the 1690s - but failed. It them came up with the bright idea of joining in a Union with England and Wales. That way, the Scots could more easily colonise the world.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for



A graduate of Oxford University, England, Tim now holds the 3Com Founders chair at the Laboratory for Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL)at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He directs the World Wide Web Consortium, an open forum of companies and organizations with the mission to lead the Web to its full potential.

With a background of system design in real-time communications and text processing software development, in 1989 he invented the World Wide Web, an internet-based hypermedia initiative for global information sharing. while working at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory. He wrote the first web client (browser-editor) and server in 1990.

Before coming to CERN, Tim worked with Image Computer Systems, of Ferndown, Dorset, England and before that as a principal engineer with Plessey Telecommunications, in Poole, England.

http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/
 

Daz_Hockey

Council Member
Nov 21, 2005
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RE: British inventions th

yeah and check...he's a senior lecturer at southampton university now, I saw him last week
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

He was voted the 99th Greatest Briton Ever.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
46,521
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

The BBC, during the "100 Greatest Britons" show.

Churchill was voted number 1.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

In 2002, the BBC undertook a poll in which it asked members of the Great British public to vote on the Greatest Britons of the last 1000 years.

Obviously, many people voted for people such as Shakespeare and Elizabeth I - even though those two were never British, as Britain didn't come into existence until England and Scotland unified together in 1707 but Wales was already united with England, but the country was still know as "England."

Anyway, here's the info -

In 2002, the BBC conducted a vote to discover the 100 Greatest Britons of all time. The poll resulted in some unlikely candidates including Guy Fawkes, Aleister Crowley, Johnny Rotten, and King Richard III. It also included two living Irish nationals (Bono and Bob Geldof), who are not British, and James Connolly, the Irish nationalist who was shot by the British in 1916 (although Connolly was born in Scotland). Some Irish people have complained about the BBC's habit of including Irish nationals in "British" lists and more recently e-mail campaigns to the BBC have registered the displeasure of Irish people at being referred to as British (ALL of Ireland was part of Britain between 1801 and 1922. Now only Northern Ireland is part of Britain). Sir Ernest Shackleton and the Duke of Wellington were born in Ireland when the whole island was part of the United Kingdom (before 1922 and the Anglo-Irish Treaty). (Wellington, however, certainly regarded himself as English, observing that because Jesus was born in a stable it did not make him a horse.) As Ireland was never part of Britain, but the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (which clearly shows Britain and Ireland to be separate entities), it may be technically incorrect to refer to them as being British.

There was also controversy over the descriptor "British" being applied to many people born before the foundation of the British state under the Acts of Union 1707. For example William Shakespeare and Elizabeth I were never "British", but rather English.

The highest-placed Scottish entry was Alexander Fleming in 20th place, with the highest Welsh entry Owain Glyndŵr in 23rd. The only Briton of British Asian ethnicity on the list was Freddie Mercury.

There was also some controversy and complaints over the method of voting for the top ten, with large scale organised multiple phone votes being identified as being placed by students at Churchill College and Brunel University for their namesakes, which gave these two figures far more votes than any other candidates.

The resulting series, Great Britons, included individual programmes on the top ten, with viewers having further opportunities to vote after each programme. It concluded with a debate.

Due to the nature of the poll used to select and rank the Britons, the results do not pretend to be an objective assessment. They are as follows:

100 Greatest Britons (no1 at the top, no100 at the bottom)

Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965), Prime Minister during World War II
Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859), engineer, creator of Great Western Railway and other significant works
Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997), first wife of HRH Charles, Prince of Wales (1981-1996) and mother of Princes William & Harry of Wales.
Charles Darwin (1809-1882), naturalist, originator of the theory of evolution through natural selection and author of The Origin of Species.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), English poet and playwright, thought of by many as the greatest of all writers in the English language.
Sir Isaac Newton, physicist
Queen Elizabeth I of England, monarch
John Lennon (1940-1980), of The Beatles, musician
Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, naval commander
Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector
Sir Ernest Shackleton, polar explorer
Captain James Cook, explorer
Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts
Alfred the Great, King of Wessex
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, military commander and statesman
Margaret Thatcher, Prime Minister
Michael Crawford, actor
Queen Victoria, monarch
Sir Paul McCartney, of The Beatles musician
Sir Alexander Fleming, pharmaceutical innovator
Alan Turing, pioneer of computing
Michael Faraday, scientist
Owain Glyndŵr, Prince of Wales
Queen Elizabeth II, monarch
Professor Stephen Hawking, theoretical physicist
William Tyndale, English translator of the Bible
Emmeline Pankhurst, suffragette
William Wilberforce, humanitarian
David Bowie, musician
Guy Fawkes, English revolutionary
Leonard Cheshire, Baron Cheshire, aviator and charity organiser
Eric Morecambe, comedian
David Beckham, footballer
Thomas Paine, political philosopher
Boudica, leader of Celtic resistance to the Roman Empire
Sir Steve Redgrave, Olympic rower
Sir Thomas More, English lawyer and politician
William Blake, author and printer
John Harrison, clock designer
King Henry VIII of England, monarch
Charles Dickens, author
Sir Frank Whittle, jet engine inventor
John Peel, broadcaster
John Logie Baird, television pioneer
Aneurin Bevan, politician
Boy George, musician
Sir Douglas Bader, aviator and charity campaigner
Sir William Wallace, Guardian of Scotland
Sir Francis Drake, English naval commander
John Wesley, Methodist leader
King Arthur, semi-mythical Celtic monarch
Florence Nightingale, nurse and charity campaigner
T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia), Arabist and soldier
Sir Robert Falcon Scott, polar explorer
Enoch Powell, politician
Sir Cliff Richard, musician
Alexander Graham Bell, telephone pioneer
Freddie Mercury, musician
Dame Julie Andrews, actress and singer
Sir Edward Elgar, composer
Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, Queen consort
George Harrison, of The Beatles musician
Sir David Attenborough, broadcaster
James Connolly, Irish revolutionary
George Stephenson, railway pioneer
Sir Charlie Chaplin, comic actor
Tony Blair, Prime Minister
William Caxton, English printer
Bobby Moore, footballer
Jane Austen, author
William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army
King Henry V of England, monarch
Aleister Crowley, mystic
Robert I, King of Scots
Bob Geldof, Irish musician
The Unknown Warrior, soldier of the Great War
Robbie Williams, musician and former member of Take That
Edward Jenner, pioneer of vaccination
David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George, prime minister
Charles Babbage, mathematician and pioneer of computing
Geoffrey Chaucer, English author
King Richard III of England, monarch
J.K. Rowling, author
James Watt, developer of the steam engine
Sir Richard Branson, businessman and adventurer
Bono, Irish musician
John Lydon (Johnny Rotten), musician
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, military commander
Donald Campbell, water speed world record challenger
King Henry II of England, monarch
James Clerk Maxwell, physicist
J.R.R. Tolkien, author and linguistics professor
Sir Walter Raleigh, English explorer
King Edward I of England, monarch
Sir Barnes Wallis, aviation technology pioneer
Richard Burton, actor
Tony Benn, politician
David Livingstone, missionary and explorer
Sir Tim Berners-Lee, internet pioneer
Marie Stopes, promoter of birth control

wikipedia.org
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

Well it's slim pick'ns on the Isle you know!
 

Jay

Executive Branch Member
Jan 7, 2005
8,366
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

The Great Book of British Smiles!!
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Re: RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit

Jay said:
Well it's slim pick'ns on the Isle you know!

We've probably got more contenders for our Top 100 citizens than probably every other country in the world.

When the French, Germans and Americans copied us by doing a similar things, they struggled to find any serious contenders.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

Americans so struggled to find 100 great Americans that in their "100 Greatest Americans" they voted Jesus as number 13.
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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RE: British inventions that foreigners have taken credit for

100 Worst Britons is one in a series of "100 Greatest..." etc shows to be shown on British TV.

The poll by the British TV station Channel 4 in 2003, was inspired by the BBC series 100 Greatest Britons, though it was less serious in nature. The aim was to discover the 100 Worst Britons We Love To Hate. The poll specified that the nominees had to be British, alive and not currently in prison or pending trial, although enough respondents ignored this for a fictional character and a pop band to be listed among the "winners".

The results of the vote were shown on Channel 4 in an evening-long programme presented by British comedian Jimmy Carr. The programme was a countdown from No. 100 to No. 1, featuring TV clips of the Britons in question, together with various commentators suggesting why they had made the list.

The results reflected the opinions of those who voted on the Channel 4 website. As with many similar votes, little or no effort was expended to prevent people voting more than once. The resulting list turned out to consist mostly of minor celebrities and politicians.


The results are shown below. People marked (*) also appeared on the 100 Greatest Britons list.

Tony Blair (* 67th)
Jordan
Margaret Thatcher (* 16th)
Jade Goody
Martin Bashir
Gareth Gates
Alex Ferguson
H from Steps
Geri Halliwell
Queen Elizabeth II (* 24th)
Liam Gallagher
Chris Evans
Victoria Beckham
Rik Waller
Anthea Turner
Bernard Manning
Robbie Williams (* 77th)
Peter Stringfellow
Neil and Christine Hamilton - 2 people
Jim Davidson
Charlotte Church
Darren Day
Lady Victoria Hervey
HRH The Prince of Wales
Anne Robinson
Edwina Currie
Chris Moyles
Jamie Oliver
Cliff Richard (* 56th)
Max Clifford
The 3AM Girls - 3 people
Naomi Campbell
Simon Cowell
Sara Cox
Harry Potter - who appears on this list despite being a fictional character and therefore not strictly eligible for inclusion
Tara Palmer-Tomkinson
James Hewitt
Andrew Lloyd Webber
Catherine Zeta-Jones
Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex
Tracey Emin
Lawrence Llewelyn-Bowen
Mick Hucknall
Michael Winner
Pete Waterman
Naseem Hamed
Ainsley Harriott
Trinny and Susannah - 2 people
Peter Mandelson
Ken Livingstone
Darius Danesh
Amanda Holden
Zoë Ball
Martine McCutcheon
Elton John
Ant and Dec - 2 people
Alastair Campbell
Ozzy Osbourne
Stephen Byers and Jo Moore - 2 people
Richard Madeley
Vinnie Jones
Alan Titchmarsh
The Countess of Wessex
Chris Tarrant
Ben Elton
Jeremy Clarkson
Jeremy Spake
Carol Vorderman
David Dickinson
Frank Skinner
Paul Burrell
Tom Jones
Sarah, Duchess of York
Carol Smillie
Liz Hurley
The Princess Royal
Guy Ritchie
Delia Smith
Johnny Vaughan
Peter Tatchell
Sting
Gordon Ramsay
Mick Jagger
Damien Hirst
Julie Burchill
Richard Branson (* 85th)
John Prescott
Judith Chalmers
Cherie Blair
Nigella Lawson
David Beckham (* 33rd)
Will Young
Vanessa Feltz
Ann Widdecombe
Davina McCall
Chris Eubank
The Lord Irvine of Lairg
Craig David
Iain Duncan Smith
Atomic Kitten - actually a pop group, not a single person (3 people)

wikipedia.org