Bridge Collapse in Baltimore.

bill barilko

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Mar 4, 2009
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It's all OK the Chinese can install something suitable in a few months-nothing too extravagant though because the yanks can't afford it.

 
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bob the dog

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Apparently the ship lost power and they knew they were in trouble. Unfortunate for the maintenance crew that was caught on the bridge. Traffic had been halted.
 

spaminator

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Toronto trucker on bridge just before collapse, too close for comfort

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Published Mar 26, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

Just hours before a cargo ship crashed into Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge, Toronto trucker Benjamin J. Dichter was on that bridge.

For Toronto trucker Benjamin J. Dichter, it was A Bridge too Close as opposed to one too far.


But this was no movie like the 1970s classic about the allied efforts to liberate The Netherlands during the Second World War.


This was real life.

Just hours before a cargo ship crashed into Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge, causing it to collapse, Dichter was on that very bridge. Picking up and dropping off loads while driving his rig between Washington and Baltimore, he had marvelled at how interesting the bridge looked.

“I saw that a lot of money had been put into this bridge and I had a feeling I should take a picture of it,” he told The Toronto Sun. “I have my cellphone fixed on the dash of the truck and there was a good view.”

After the collapse, Dichter posted to X, “the bridge was great earlier today and one of cleaner ones, looked like it had massive revitalization. Hope everyone is OK. The 2nd big bullet (dodged) by just a few hours in the last few years. 1) Baltimore bridge collapse. 2) Danforth Shooting.”


Earlier Tuesday on the popular Marc Patrone Morning Show on SAUGA 960 radio, he said never in a million years did he think that just hours later there would be such a horrific catastrophe.

As of Tuesday evening, six people were missing and presumed dead, after a cargo ship lost power and rammed into the bridge, plunging it into the river in a terrifying collapse, according to the Associated Press.



“My heart goes out to those families of the missing,” said Dichter.

It’s not lost on him that if the timing had been a little different, it could have been him, as well. It was too close for comfort.

“You just never know,” Dichter said, adding he had a similar twist of fate at the time of the July 2018 Danforth Ave. shooting, which left two victims dead and 13 others injured. He was supposed to meet friends at a cafe which was targeted by the gunman, but postponed the plan at the last minute.



“It’s scary,” said the author of Honking for Freedom, a popular book detailing the inside story of the 2022 Freedom Convoy protest of which he was a leader.

He doesn’t see a book or movie, however, with this tragedy in Maryland. Unlike many who are suggesting there may have been something nefarious involved in the collapse, Dichter said he just doesn’t see it.


“To me, it just looks like a tragic accident,” said Dichter.

While he has seen and heard such online discussions — as some compared the mishap to the vandalism attack by environmentalists on a Coastal Gaslink pipeline work camp in B.C. or the blowing up of the Nord Steam pipeline under the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany — Dichter said he’s seen no evidence to draw such dramatic conclusions.

“Today, too many of us are quick to jump to conclusions, attributing abnormalities and accidents to conspiracy theories centred on national security threats or inside jobs,” he said. “I believe this tendency is a by-product of our current era, where our political class consistently behave as Neville Chamberlain in its approach to the crucial issues of our time.”


On an X space Tuesday, Dichter was on stage with a ship’s pilot, who explained it from the point of view of somebody who helps bring large vessels into port.

“It looks like the crew of the ship had lost control due to a mechanical failure, panicked, and lost control of the boat, evidenced by the plume of diesel smoke just before the boat hit the bridge,” said Dichter.

That said, he agreed an investigation is warranted and lessons need to be learned from the disaster.

Mostly, as he thinks of the missing construction workers or anybody else who may have been on the bridge, Dichter also reflects on how it also could have been him.
 
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petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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They police also had 90 seconds to close the bridge. Probably why there were no cars lost.
Weejio I watch from the harbour stream showed 2 power failures dead sticking the ship. Power came back and they threw it in full reverse spewing enough carbon to heat 50,00 igloos.

If you follow space weather, we were allegedly hit with a massive Coronal Mass Ejection with potential to fuck shit up. Did it?

Being old Im up to pee 3 times a night. Im always looking for any geomagnetic anomalies to photograph. There was zilch for auroras but definitely satellite issues yesterday.



Strongest solar storm since 2017 hits Earth but leaves aurora chasers in the dark​

News
By Daisy Dobrijevic
published 3 days ago
What could have been a solar storm of the decade ended up more like a storm in a teacup.
 
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spaminator

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Body of 5th missing worker found more than a month after Baltimore bridge collapse, officials say
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published May 02, 2024 • 1 minute read


BALTIMORE (AP) — Authorities said they have recovered the body of a fifth person who was missing after the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge more than a month ago.


The Key Bridge Response Unified Command announced that the victim found Wednesday was identified as Miguel Angel Luna Gonzalez, 49, of Glen Burnie, Maryland.

Six members of a roadwork crew plunged to their deaths on March 26 when a container ship lost power and crashed into one of the bridge’s supporting columns. Five bodies have now been recovered, but one worker, Jose Mynor Lopez, has not been found. They were all Latino immigrants who came to the United States from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.

Salvage teams found one of the missing construction vehicles Wednesday and notified the Maryland State Police, officials said. State police investigators and Maryland Transportation Authority Police officers and the FBI responded to the scene and recovered the body inside a red truck. The state police underwater recovery team and crime scene unit also assisted.


“We remain dedicated to the ongoing recovery operations while knowing behind each person lost in this tragedy lies a loving family,” Maryland State Police Superintendent Roland Butler said in a statement. “Along with our local, state and federal partners, we ask that everyone extend their deepest sympathies and support to the families during this difficult time.”

The Dali container ship has been stationary amid the wreckage since the collapse, but crews plan to refloat and remove the ship, allowing more maritime traffic to resume through Baltimore’s port. Officials expect to have it removed by May 10, according to a Port of Baltimore news release.
 

spaminator

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Cargo ship that caused Baltimore bridge collapse had blackouts before leaving port
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Lea Skene And Denise Lavoie
Published May 14, 2024 • 3 minute read

BALTIMORE — The cargo ship Dali experienced an electrical blackout about 10 hours before leaving the Port of Baltimore and yet again shortly before it slammed into the Francis Key Bridge and killed six construction workers, federal investigators said Tuesday, providing the most detailed account yet of the tragedy.


The power outage occurred after a crewmember mistakenly closed an exhaust damper, causing the ship’s engine to stall, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board said in their preliminary report. Shortly after leaving Baltimore, the ship crashed into one of the bridge’s supporting columns because another power outage caused it to lose steering at the exact worst moment.

The report provides new details about how the ship’s crew addressed the power issues it experienced while still docked in Baltimore. A full investigation could take a year or more, according to the safety board.

Testing of the ship’s fuel did not reveal any concerns related to its quality, according to the report.

After the initial blackout caused by the closed exhaust damper, investigators say a backup generator automatically came on. It continued to run for a short period — until insufficient fuel pressure caused it to kick off again, resulting in a second blackout.


That’s when crewmembers made changes to the ship’s electrical configuration, switching from one transformer and breaker system it had been using for several months to another that was in use upon its departure, according to the report.

Investigators stopped short of drawing a direct line between those earlier power issues and the blackout that ultimately caused the bridge collapse.

“The NTSB is still investigating the electrical configuration following the first in-port blackout and potential impacts on the events during the accident voyage,” investigators wrote.

The safety board launched its investigation almost immediately after the collapse, which sent six members of a roadwork crew plunging to their deaths. Investigators boarded the ship to document the scene and collect evidence, including the vessel’s data recorder and information from its engine room, according to board chair Jennifer Homendy. Investigators also interviewed the captain and crew members.


“Our mission is to determine why something happened, how it happened and to prevent it from recurring,” Homendy said at a news conference days after the disaster.

According to the preliminary report, at 1:25 a.m. on March 26, when the Dali was a little over half a mile away from the bridge, a primary electrical breaker that fed most of the ship’s equipment and lighting unexpectedly tripped, causing the ship to lose power. The main propulsion diesel engine shut down after the pumps lost power. The ship’s crew was able to restore power, then called for an assist from tug boats and the senior pilot ordered the ship’s anchor to be dropped.

A second blackout then occurred and a marine radio call was made to warn waterborne traffic. The ship then struck a main support pier on the bridge, causing it to collapse within seconds.


The ship, which was headed from Baltimore to Sri Lanka, issued a mayday alert with just enough time for police to stop traffic, but not enough to save the workers filling potholes on the bridge.

The last of the victims’ bodies was recovered last week.

On Monday, crews conducted a controlled demolition to break down the largest remaining span of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge, a major step in freeing the grounded Dali container ship.

The board’s preliminary report released Tuesday likely includes a fraction of the findings that will be presented in its final report, which is expected to take more than a year.

The FBI has also launched a criminal investigation into the circumstances leading up to the collapse.

Homendy said the National Transportation Safety Board investigation would probe all aspects of the crash, including what caused the ship’s power loss and whether it had been experiencing similar issues prior to the blackout. Investigators also planned to review policies, training practices and other factors that could be relevant. And the design, engineering and condition of the bridge would be studied, she said.

Homendy said before a U.S. Senate committee last month that the investigation was focused on the ship’s electrical system generally.
 

petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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Cargo ship that caused Baltimore bridge collapse had blackouts before leaving port
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Lea Skene And Denise Lavoie
Published May 14, 2024 • 3 minute read

BALTIMORE — The cargo ship Dali experienced an electrical blackout about 10 hours before leaving the Port of Baltimore and yet again shortly before it slammed into the Francis Key Bridge and killed six construction workers, federal investigators said Tuesday, providing the most detailed account yet of the tragedy.


The power outage occurred after a crewmember mistakenly closed an exhaust damper, causing the ship’s engine to stall, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board said in their preliminary report. Shortly after leaving Baltimore, the ship crashed into one of the bridge’s supporting columns because another power outage caused it to lose steering at the exact worst moment.

The report provides new details about how the ship’s crew addressed the power issues it experienced while still docked in Baltimore. A full investigation could take a year or more, according to the safety board.

Testing of the ship’s fuel did not reveal any concerns related to its quality, according to the report.

After the initial blackout caused by the closed exhaust damper, investigators say a backup generator automatically came on. It continued to run for a short period — until insufficient fuel pressure caused it to kick off again, resulting in a second blackout.


That’s when crewmembers made changes to the ship’s electrical configuration, switching from one transformer and breaker system it had been using for several months to another that was in use upon its departure, according to the report.

Investigators stopped short of drawing a direct line between those earlier power issues and the blackout that ultimately caused the bridge collapse.

“The NTSB is still investigating the electrical configuration following the first in-port blackout and potential impacts on the events during the accident voyage,” investigators wrote.

The safety board launched its investigation almost immediately after the collapse, which sent six members of a roadwork crew plunging to their deaths. Investigators boarded the ship to document the scene and collect evidence, including the vessel’s data recorder and information from its engine room, according to board chair Jennifer Homendy. Investigators also interviewed the captain and crew members.


“Our mission is to determine why something happened, how it happened and to prevent it from recurring,” Homendy said at a news conference days after the disaster.

According to the preliminary report, at 1:25 a.m. on March 26, when the Dali was a little over half a mile away from the bridge, a primary electrical breaker that fed most of the ship’s equipment and lighting unexpectedly tripped, causing the ship to lose power. The main propulsion diesel engine shut down after the pumps lost power. The ship’s crew was able to restore power, then called for an assist from tug boats and the senior pilot ordered the ship’s anchor to be dropped.

A second blackout then occurred and a marine radio call was made to warn waterborne traffic. The ship then struck a main support pier on the bridge, causing it to collapse within seconds.


The ship, which was headed from Baltimore to Sri Lanka, issued a mayday alert with just enough time for police to stop traffic, but not enough to save the workers filling potholes on the bridge.

The last of the victims’ bodies was recovered last week.

On Monday, crews conducted a controlled demolition to break down the largest remaining span of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge, a major step in freeing the grounded Dali container ship.

The board’s preliminary report released Tuesday likely includes a fraction of the findings that will be presented in its final report, which is expected to take more than a year.

The FBI has also launched a criminal investigation into the circumstances leading up to the collapse.

Homendy said the National Transportation Safety Board investigation would probe all aspects of the crash, including what caused the ship’s power loss and whether it had been experiencing similar issues prior to the blackout. Investigators also planned to review policies, training practices and other factors that could be relevant. And the design, engineering and condition of the bridge would be studied, she said.

Homendy said before a U.S. Senate committee last month that the investigation was focused on the ship’s electrical system generally.
Doesnt Baltimore have shore power for ships?
 

spaminator

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Barge hits Gulf Coast bridge in Texas, causing partial collapse, oil spill
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Lekan Oyekanmi And Juan Lozano
Published May 15, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

Oil spills into the surrounding waters after a barge hit a bridge.
Oil spills into the surrounding waters after a barge hit a bridge in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday, May 15, 2024. PHOTO BY KTRK /The Associated Press
GALVESTON, Texas — A barge slammed into a bridge pillar in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday, spilling oil into surrounding waters and closing the only road to a smaller and separate island that is home to a university, officials said. There were no immediate reports of injuries, although officials said one person on the barge was knocked into the water and quickly rescued.

The bridge that leads to Pelican Island, north of Galveston, was struck by the barge around 9:50 a.m. when a tugboat backing out of Texas International Terminals, a fuel storage operator next to the bridge, lost control of two barges it was pushing, said David Flores, a bridge superintendent with the Galveston County Navigation District.


“The current was very bad, and the tide was high. He lost it,” Flores said.

One of the barges hit the bridge and two telephone poles, he said.



The accident came weeks after a cargo ship crashed into a support column of the Francis Key Bridge in Baltimore on March 26, killing six construction workers.

The accident Wednesday knocked one man off the vessel and into the water, but he was quickly recovered and was not injured, said Galveston County Sheriff’s Office Maj. Ray Nolen.

The tugboat was pushing bunker barges, which are fuel barges for ships, Flores said. The accident resulted in oil spilling from the barge into the channel off Galveston Bay and crews were working to clean it up, he said. The barge, which is owned by Martin Petroleum, has a 30,000-gallon capacity, but it’s not clear how much leaked into the bay, said Galveston County spokesperson Spencer Lewis. He said about 10.5 km of the waterway were shut down because of the spill.


Galveston County Judge Mark Henry said the temporary closure of the waterway should not have a significant impact on water commerce in the area.

“This area is somewhat isolated,” Henry told KTRK. “It’s not part of the Intracoastal Waterway and it’s not part of the Houston Ship Channel. They have other options around this area.”

Oil spills into the surrounding waters after a barge hit a bridge in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday, May 15, 2024. A bridge that leads to Pelican Island, located just north of Galveston, was hit by a barge around 9:30 a.m., said Ronnie Varela, with the Galveston’s Office of Emergency Management.
Oil spills into the surrounding waters after a barge hit a bridge in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday, May 15, 2024. A bridge that leads to Pelican Island, located just north of Galveston, was hit by a barge around 9:30 a.m., said Ronnie Varela, with the Galveston’s Office of Emergency Management. PHOTO BY KTRK /The Associated Press
Pelican Island, which is connected to Galveston by the bridge, is home to a large shipyard, Texas A&M University of Galveston, and Seawolf Park, a former immigration station that now attracts tourists to its iconic fishing pier and decommissioned U.S. navy vessels. There are currently about 180 students, faculty and staff on the university’s campus, a spokesperson said.

Fire trucks drove over the bridge as workers and law enforcement officials looked at the remnants of the collapsed rail line. Aerial footage showed a large piece of broken concrete and debris from the railroad hanging off the side of the bridge and laying on the barge that officials said rammed into the passageway.


Flores said the rail line only serves as protection for the structure and has never been used.



A statement posted on the City of Galveston’s Facebook page said there were no reports of injuries and that the island is currently inaccessible to car traffic.

“Engineers from the Texas Department of Transportation are also en route to inspect the roadway and determine if there is damage,” the statement said. “The bridge will remain closed until it is deemed safe to use.”

Transportation officials were allowing vehicles to exit Pelican Island on Wednesday afternoon, but the bridge remained closed to all other vehicular traffic.


Texas A&M directed all non-essential employees at its Galveston campus to leave as soon as possible and said it plans to remain closed until at least Friday. Students who live on campus were allowed to remain there, but university officials warned those who live on campus and leave “should be prepared to remain off campus for an unknown period of time.”

Opened in 1960, the Pelican Island Causeway Bridge was rated as “poor” according to the Federal Highway Administration’s 2023 National Bridge Inventory released last June.

The overall rating of a bridge is based on whether the condition of any of its individual components — the deck, superstructure, substructure or culvert, if present — is rated poor or below.


In the case of the Pelican Island Causeway Bridge, inspectors rated the deck in “satisfactory condition,” the substructure in “fair condition” and the superstructure — or the component that absorbs the live traffic load — in “poor condition.”

The Texas Department of Transportation had been scheduled in the summer of 2025 to begin construction on a project to replace the bridge with a new one. The project was estimated to cost $194 million. In documents provided during a virtual public meeting last year, the department said the bridge has “reached the end of its design lifespan, and needs to be replaced.” The agency said it has spent over $12 million performing maintenance and repairs on the bridge in the past decade.

The bridge has one main steel span that measures 50 m, and federal data shows it was last inspected in December 2021. However, it’s unclear from the data if a state inspection took place after the Federal Highway Administration compiled the data.

The bridge had an average daily traffic figure of about 9,100 cars and trucks, according to a 2011 estimate.
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