Blue Lives Matter

Tecumsehsbones

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That's why I'm proud to announce the new Chief of Staff of the Air Force, General Charles Q. "CQ" Brown. . .



. . . and the new Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, Joanne Bass. . .



Send 'em high into the blue, General, Chief Master Sergeant!
 

spaminator

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'THEY FINISHED THEM OFF': Mexican town rocked by bloody ambush that killed 13 cops
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Anthony Esposito
Publishing date:Mar 19, 2021 • 8 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubble7 Comments
Police officers work at a crime scene where gunmen killed at least 13 Mexican police officers in an ambush, in Coatepec Harinas, Mexico, Friday, March 19, 2021.
Police officers work at a crime scene where gunmen killed at least 13 Mexican police officers in an ambush, in Coatepec Harinas, Mexico, Friday, March 19, 2021. PHOTO BY EDGARD GARRIDO /REUTERS
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COATEPEC HARINES — Bullet casings still littered the ground on Friday in Coatepec Harinas, a troubled municipality southwest of Mexico City, a day after 13 police officers on patrol were brutally murdered in an ambush by suspected gang members.

Forensic teams and dozens of heavily armed police and military officials gathered at the cordoned off crime scene with checkpoints in place after what was one of the worst mass slayings of Mexican law enforcement officials in years.


Some residents looked on from their homes, shaken by the violence that rocked the small town nestled between verdant hills and corn fields, where most people make their living cultivating crops.

Local police said crime is common there, but Thursday’s ambush was particularly harrowing for local people, with bullets strafing some of their homes.

The convoy of security personnel was attacked in broad daylight by gunmen as it patrolled the area about 40 miles (64 km) south of the city of Toluca, authorities said.

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The attackers rounded up the bodies of the fallen police officers into a pile and continued to spray them with bullets, according to a local officer at the scene on Friday.

“They finished them off,” said the officer, who declined to give his name. He had lost colleagues in the ambush, he said.

Local resident Guadalupe Flores, 26, said she heard the shooting directly outside her window when it started.

Evidence markers are pictured at a crime scene where gunmen killed at least 13 Mexican police officers in an ambush, in Coatepec Harinas, Mexico, Friday, March 19, 2021.
Evidence markers are pictured at a crime scene where gunmen killed at least 13 Mexican police officers in an ambush, in Coatepec Harinas, Mexico, Friday, March 19, 2021. PHOTO BY EDGARD GARRIDO /REUTERS
She had just finished feeding her baby and, fearing for their lives, took the child and hid at the back of the house until the violence was over about a half hour later.

“I was terrified for my girl… It sounded horrible,” Flores said, pointing at the bullet casings in her driveway and bullet holes on the cement wall of her home. Men cursed loudly at each other in her driveway during the shooting, she said.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Friday vowed to bring the killers to justice.

“We are filled with sorrow about what happened in the State of Mexico,” he said at a regular news conference, referring to the state where the killings occurred.

There would not be “impunity” for anyone, he added.
 

spaminator

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WARMINGTON: Accused released on bail two weeks after allegedly trying to kill Toronto cop
Ontario’s broken justice system sparks outrage among police officers and others

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Publishing date:Apr 09, 2021 • 20 hours ago • 3 minute read • 86 Comments
Scales of justice.
Scales of justice. PHOTO BY STOCK IMAGE /TORONTO SUN
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When Premier Doug Ford asked people to stay at home, it likely didn’t occur to many it would also apply to a man accused of trying to kill a Toronto cop.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, on whether to grant bail for a man charged with attempted murder in the stabbing of a Toronto cop, the court must decide between an accused’s health and safety and that of the public.


In this case, in the courts at 2201 Finch Ave., the justice of the peace opted to grant Neelkanth Shah, 19, bail on Friday.

Charged with attempted murder, aggravated assault, four counts of robbery, robbery with an offensive weapon and five counts of disguise following an incident inside a Mimico bank on March 26, Shah was released on the promise of a $300,000 surety put up by his family and he has been ordered to remain under house arrest where he will be monitored by an electronic ankle bracelet.

“It’s absolutely ridiculous. We had two police officers sent to hospital that night bleeding,” said Toronto City Councillor Mark Grimes, who in angry tweet called Ontario’s justice system “broken.”


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He and many police officers were already outraged that Nathaniel Mohabir, 19, charged with robbery with an offensive weapon, disguise with intent and assault with intent to resist arrest, was released on bail March 28 — barely 24 hours after he and Shah were arrested.

But now that the suspect charged with trying to kill a police officer is joining him, there’s outrage.

“How can bail being granted to this individual in these circumstances be anything less than a failure in the administration of justice?” Toronto Police Association President Jon Reid said. “If these circumstances do not result in detention, I am left wondering what will?”


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It is an excellent question.

The Attorney General has yet to comment. We are told the Crown attorney’s office did contest the bail application but Justice of the Peace Anne Judith Montreuil had the final say.

Needless to say when you have someone before the courts charged with a stabbing a police officer, as well as being alleged to have participated in several bank heists, police are expressing concern.

“We continuously advocate on issues of public safety,” TPA Vice President Brian Callanan said. “The light needs pointed at this one.”


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In the meantime, a bio on an Attorney General news release announcing the JP’s July 2017 appointment said “Montreuil has been the chief of social work and attendance services at the Toronto District School Board since 2014. As a sessional professor at Sheridan College, she taught courses on social work, social justice and conflict resolution. Justice of the Peace Montreuil has volunteered with youth through programs including the Young Men’s Stand Up Conference.”

We have ordered a transcript to see if she offered reasons for her decision. One participant in the process said concerns over rising COVID spread did come up in the hearing.

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A Toronto Police cruiser
WARMINGTON: Alleged bank robber who put a police officer in hospital now on bail
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REID: Bail system sending wrong message, eroding confidence in administration of justice
(Postmedia file photo)
'CLOSE CALL': Two cops stabbed taking down Mimico bank robbery suspects

This is a sore spot for police who have seen numerous accused released on bail only to later allegedly commit more crime — most notably a disturbing assault on a York Regional Police officer allegedly by a man still in his prison garb.

Since police are under scrutiny for their performance, perhaps JPs and judges should be as well. Rate them, and make them accountable, like sports officials are.

And when someone breaches bail, the system should start collecting the bail money.


Another thing the justice system also often forgets are the victims. In this case, the victims are two fine police officers still healing from their wounds and said to be surprised by the ease both suspects received bail.

“Our members, and in turn the community at large, must question the justice system today,” Reid said.

It certainly is a head scratcher that someone accused of trying to kill a cop is under house arrest not unlike the law-abiding families are during this pandemic.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 
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spaminator

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Two North Carolina deputies shot dead by gunman suspected of killing parents
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Apr 29, 2021 • 13 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
One person is in custody after five people were sent to hospital with stab wounds following a bush party near Kelowna early Sunday morning.
One person is in custody after five people were sent to hospital with stab wounds following a bush party near Kelowna early Sunday morning. PHOTO BY FILE /Postmedia
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Two sheriff’s deputies were shot dead by a gunman suspected of killing his parents at their home in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, authorities said on Thursday.

The 32-year-old suspect, Isaac Alton Barnes, later died of a self-inflicted gun wound, local media reported.


During a 13-hour standoff between law enforcement and the suspect on Wednesday at the house in the town of Boone, a third police officer was hit by gunfire but his ballistic helmet protected him and he was uninjured, the Watauga County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

The deputies were shot after conducting a “welfare check” at the home following a report by the homeowner’s employer that he failed to show up for work, the sheriff said.

“Upon entering the home, two Watauga County Sheriff’s deputies received gunshot wounds from an unknown individual within the residence,” authorities said.


The deputies were identified as K-9 Deputy Logan Fox, 25, who died at the scene, and Sergeant Chris Ward, 36, who died after being flown to Johnson City Medical Center for treatment, the sheriff said. Fox was a two-year veteran of the sheriff’s office and Ward, a father of two, was an eight-year veteran.

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Other law enforcement officers who rushed to the scene were able to pull Ward from the home but the wounded Fox remained in the house throughout the ensuing standoff, local media reported.

Barnes is also suspected of killing his mother, Michelle Annette Ligon, 61, and his stepfather, George Wyatt Ligon, 58.

The sheriff’s office said in the statement that Barnes “died at the scene.” The office did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for information about the cause of the gunman’s death.

“This is an incredibly tragic situation and our thoughts and prayers are with everyone involved as well as their families and our community,” Watauga County Sheriff Len Hagaman said.

The shooting is under investigation by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.
 
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spaminator

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U.S. tourists given life terms for murdering Italian policeman
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 05, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
U.S. citizen Finnegan Lee Elder, accused together with U.S. citizen Gabriel Natale-Hjorth, reacts after being found guilty of the murder of the Italian Carabinieri paramilitary police officer Mario Cerciello Rega, in the courthouse in Rome, Italy, May 5, 2021.
U.S. citizen Finnegan Lee Elder, accused together with U.S. citizen Gabriel Natale-Hjorth, reacts after being found guilty of the murder of the Italian Carabinieri paramilitary police officer Mario Cerciello Rega, in the courthouse in Rome, Italy, May 5, 2021. PHOTO BY REMO CASILLI /REUTERS
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ROME — Two American tourists have been found guilty of murdering a policeman near their Rome hotel in 2019 and have been sentenced to life in prison, a judge said in a verdict read out to a packed court.

Finnegan Lee Elder, who was 19 at the time, had admitted to stabbing Mario Cerciello Rega in the early hours of July 26, 2019, while his friend Gabriel Christian Natale-Hjorth, then 18, was tussling with another police officer.

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However, the pair say they had acted in self defense because they thought the two police officers, who were not in uniform at the time, were thugs out to get them after a botched attempt to buy drugs.

The court rejected their testimony and handed down the toughest punishment possible in Italy. Under Italy’s penal code, criminals serving a life term can be eligible for parole after 21 years, if they have a good behavior record.

The two Americans, who come from California, were also found guilty of attempted extortion, assault, resisting a public official and carrying an attack-style knife without just cause.


The pair were led out of the courtroom as soon as the sentence had been read out. Cerciello Rega’s wife, clutching a photograph of her dead husband, was also in court and sobbed after the verdict was announced.
 

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MANDEL: Appeal court rules gunman acquitted of trying to kill cops must be retried
Author of the article:Michele Mandel
Publishing date:May 07, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • 52 Comments
Peter Aiken, 27
Peter Aiken, 27
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Maybe you can’t shoot at a cop with impunity after all.

Ontario’s highest court is sending a gunman back to trial after a judge’s shocking decision to acquit him of trying to kill a Peel Regional Police officer and wound his partner.


Peter Aiken fired at least five shots at the officers with an illegal semi-automatic Glock 22 pistol. Of course he was on probation and under a weapons prohibition at the time.

Yet somehow Justice Paul R. Currie of the Ontario Court of Justice acquitted Aiken of attempted murder of Const. Jason Beccario and pointing and discharging a firearm at Const. Manikosh Pathak.

Currie wasn’t convinced the gunman intended to kill either — but he didn’t really explain why. The appeal court found the judge failed to give adequate reasons for arriving at his controversial decision.

“It was necessary for the trial judge to provide some insight into how those verdicts were determined,” the appeal court decision states. “The reasons in this case do not perform that function.”

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Peter Aiken, 27
WARMINGTON: Outrage over sentence handed to gunman who shot at cops
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Rashawn Samuels, 26, is accused of taking part in a wild shootout in Ajax on April 28, 2021.
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According to the ruling, the officers were responding to a domestic dispute at a Brampton housing complex. When Aiken refused to co-operate, a physical struggle ensued and the police managed to get him on the ground.

Beccario went to reach for his Taser.

“Oh, you got the taser. You got a taser. You got a taser,” Aiken allegedly said mocking him. “I’ve got this.”

Pathak testified Aiken then pulled out a gun, pointed it at Beccario’s upper torso, and fired.

Beccario thought he’d been hit.

The gunman rose to his feet and fired a second shot. Beccario testified he immediately dropped down to his knee in an effort to get as small as possible to make himself less of a target. Again, he thought he’d been shot.

Beccario returned fire. Aiken moved to the roadway, aimed at the officer and discharged a third shot.

“The gun was pointing directly towards Constable Beccario,” his partner testified. “He was looking towards Constable Beccario at that time.”


As Aiken fled, he fired twice more, this time towards Pathak. Fortunately, neither officer was injured.

The gunman, though, had been hit and was found in a nearby backyard.

Aiken told the court he suffers from psychosis and a voice told him he was going to be shot that day, so he placed a Glock he’d found a few weeks earlier in the front pouch of his hoodie. He insisted the police tackled him for no reason and he fired all five shots in an attempt to get free of their chokehold.

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If he wanted to injure the officers, he would have, he told the judge: “I could’ve shot them in their leg, their balls, their chest, their head.”

At his 2019 trial, Aiken was convicted on six gun-related charges but acquitted of attempted murder and shooting at an officer.

“On all of the evidence before me, I find I am left in a reasonable doubt about whether Mr. Aiken, in all the circumstances of this case, had that requisite intention to kill,” Currie concluded.

Both the new Peel police chief and the head of the police union were understandably outraged.

“I can’t tell you how shameful I felt for those coppers,” Nishan Duraiappah told Joe Warmington. “It’s hard to rationalize.”

Peel Regional Police Chief Nishan Duraiappah.
Peel Regional Police Chief Nishan Duraiappah. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /PEEL POLICE
The judge found Aiken fired four shots while fleeing arrest — despite the officers’ testimony that he aimed directly at Beccario three times while facing him at close range.

“If he was going to reject that evidence,” noted the appeal court, “he needed to offer at least some explanation for doing so.

“This is particularly true given that the forensic evidence involving the location of the bullet strikes and cartridge casings, as well as the trajectory of the bullets, was entirely consistent with the officers’ testimony regarding the respondent standing, facing, pointing, aiming, and shooting.”

Aiken, who was serving eight years less five years credit for pre-trial custody, must be retried.

“Whatever verdicts ultimately result in this case,” the appeal court concluded, “the public and the officers involved in this matter are entitled to know the basis of those verdicts.”

mmandel@postmedia.com
 

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Mexican drug cartels now butchering cops in front of their families
Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Jun 01, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 2 minute read • 7 Comments
Relatives and members of the police department of Michoacan pay tribute to the officers killed in an ambush in Morelia, in the Mexican state of Michoacan, on October 15, 2019.
Relatives and members of the police department of Michoacan pay tribute to the officers killed in an ambush in Morelia, in the Mexican state of Michoacan, on October 15, 2019. PHOTO BY ENRIQUE CASTRO /AFP via Getty Images
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A hyper-violent Mexican drug cartel is hunting down and murdering cops in front of their horrified families.

The bloodbath is just the latest salvo in a bitter war between cops and the cartels.


In particular, the Jalisco cartel has vowed to obliterate an elite police unit known as the Tactical Group in the Mexican state of Guanajuato. The mobsters complain cops are treating them unfairly.

So far, members of the dope-dealing cartel have snatched officers off the street and brutally tortured them to give up the names and addresses of fellow cops.

Once they get the addresses, they murder officers in their homes in front of their families.

In a billboard, the cartel warned: “If you want war, you’ll get a war. We have already shown that we know where you are. We are coming for all of you. For each member of our firm (CJNG) that you arrest, we are going to kill two of your Tacticals, wherever they are, at their homes, in their patrol vehicles.”

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Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures as he speaks during a news conference at the National Palace, in Mexico City, March 24, 2021.
Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador gestures as he speaks during a news conference at the National Palace, in Mexico City, March 24, 2021. PHOTO BY EDGARD GARRIDO/FILE PHOTO /REUTERS
President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador had previously launched his “hugs, not bullets” approach in an attempt to avoid the violence that has left parts of the country looking like a war zone.

Officials have refused to say how many cops have been killed. Last Thursday, one member of the elite unit was found murdered on the side of a highway.

“A lot of them (officers) have decided to desert. They took their families, abandoned their homes and they are fleeing and in hiding,” security analyst David Saucedo said. “The CJNG is hunting the elite police force of Guanajuato.”

An independent news cooperative said they believe so far seven cops have been killed on their days off.

Between 2018 and May 12 of this year, 262 police officers have been killed — about 75 officers each year.

Saucedo added: “This is an open war against the security forces of the state government.”


The most recent violence — and Mexico’s hugs approach — is raising eyebrows.

Former U.S. Ambassador Christopher Landau said in April that Lopez Obrador seems to view the fight against drug cartels “as a distraction.”

“So he has basically adopted an agenda of a pretty laissez-faire attitude towards them, which is pretty troubling to our government, obviously,” Landau said.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
 

spaminator

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Canadian socialite charged in slaying of Belize police boss
Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Jun 01, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin poses with one of her guns.
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin poses with one of her guns. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /FACEBOOK
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The bullet that killed Police Supt. Henry Jemmott pierced his skull behind his ear.

It was his own handgun that sent the 42-year-old Belize police officer to the morgue early last Friday.


And now cops say the person who pulled the trigger is 32-year-old Canadian socialite Jasmin Hartin who is married to the youngest son of British billionaire Lord Michael Ashcroft.

Hartin was charged on Monday with manslaughter by negligence in a case that’s gripped the small Central American nation. She is being held without bail.

But sources told 7 News Belize that the pretty blond only confessed to killing the cop last Friday when detectives threatened her with cocaine charges.

Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin could face 25 years in prison.
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin could face 25 years in prison. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /FACEBOOK
The bizarre tale unfolded on the piers of San Pedro on the Caribbean side of the country. Hartin initially told detectives that Jemmott was shot by someone in a passing boat and his body fell into the water.

So far, her story has changed a number of times.

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She claimed that Jemmott was a friend and she was giving him a massage while the pair boozed together on the dock. Hartin then said she accidentally shot the longtime lawman while giving him his Glock.

Hartin claimed the cop fell on her, she panicked and his body fell into the sea.

But his family noted that his death “looked more like an assassination”.

Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott.
Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /SAN PEDRO POLICE
Jemmott was staying at the resort and dealing with relationship woes. He was a longtime friend of the Ashcroft family, local sources said.


Hartin and Ashcroft live in Belize.

“He had a gunshot behind his ear like an assassination,” the dead man’s sister, assistant police Supt. Cherry Jemmott told Belize 7. “He was a top cop. I don’t know how he let down his guard to be shot with his own gun.”

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Other sources said the Glock has a built-in trigger safety making an accidental discharge nearly impossible.

Hartin — a mother of two —works as director of lifestyle and experience at the Alaia Belize luxury resort that was developed by her husband.

At the time of the shooting, the socialite and cop were both defying a COVID curfew.

When emergency personnel arrived, they discovered the socialite soaked in blood, “distressed and shaking.”

Both families denied any romantic or sexual connection between the dead man and the socialite.

Currently, she faces 25 years in jail, but a fine is more likely.

According to The Times of London, a police source said the working theory is that the pair had been drinking and playing with Jemmott’s gun when tragedy struck.

bhunter@postmedia.com

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spaminator

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HUNTER: Canadian mom jailed in Belize after high-ranking cop shot dead
Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Jun 03, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Originally from Eastern Ontario, socialite Jasmine Hartin is now in jail charged with manslaughter in the shooting death of a police superintendent.
Originally from Eastern Ontario, socialite Jasmine Hartin is now in jail charged with manslaughter in the shooting death of a police superintendent. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /LINKEDIN
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Growing up in a small town can be akin to an angst-ridden prison.

As twilight entered Grade 13, most of my friends were ready to get out of Dodge, and did. Some stayed behind, some returned. A lot of us miss it to this day.


The pristine beaches of Belize are a long way from the hamlets of Eastern Ontario where Jasmine Hartin grew up.

But that’s where the now-socialite reveled in the high life as the daughter-in-law of a British billionaire and member of the House of Lords.

San Pedro Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott was shot to death last Friday.
San Pedro Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott was shot to death last Friday. PHOTO BY SAN PEDRO POLICE /FACEBOOK
That life is gone — maybe forever.

The 32-year-old mother of two is now rotting in a Belize prison, considered one of the most horrific in the world, charged with killing a high-ranking cop.

HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED: Early Friday, Hartin was drinking with San Pedro Police Supt. Henry Jemmott, 42, in her apartment in San Pedro. The pair apparently decided to continue boozing on a pier.

She allegedly told detectives he showed her his Glock. She gave it back and that’s when, she claimed, the gun went off probably killing Jemmott instantly. Hartin allegedly claimed the large cop fell on her so she pushed him off and he fell into the sea.

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Firearms experts allege her explanation for the way the shooting went down is bogus.

But that’s only part of the tale that has riveted media in the U.S. and U.K.

Jasmine Hartin enjoys Paris.
Jasmine Hartin enjoys Paris. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /FACEBOOK
The Toronto Sun has learned that Hartin had been married before arriving in Belize in 2014 — no doubt drawn by the sun, the sand and family members working in real estate in the tropical paradise.

Previously on social media she had extolled the virtues of Paris. She was clearly a beautiful young woman having fun and finding her way in the world.

Upon arrival in Belize, she posted a photo on her Facebook page of the beach: “That was taken in paradise.”

She began establishing herself in real estate, selling for both ReMax and high-end seller Christie’s.

Months after her arrival, Hartin appears to have hooked up with local high-flier and real estate developer Andrew Ashcroft. He is old money, big money and daddy is the billionaire Lord Michael Ashcroft.

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In Belize, the Ashcrofts carry a very big stick. Jemmons, the dead man, was a friend of the family.

Ashcroft family dream project: The new Alaia resort,
Ashcroft family dream project: The new Alaia resort, PHOTO BY ALAIA RESORT /FACEBOOK
Three weeks ago the couple opened the brand-new gleaming Alaia resort, where Hartin is the so-called “creative director.”

There have been whispers of a sexual affair between Hartin and Jemmons. One report said before the fateful night, Jemmons boasted he “had a date” and he would take the secret of who “to his grave.”

Local media said Hartin was blood-soaked when she was busted and offered nothing. Then, cops threatened her with cocaine possession. Never a good scene in a place like Belize.

So far, Hartin has been charged with negligent manslaughter and there is the real possibility she could wiggle off the hook with a fine if found guilty.

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Jemmons’ family are calling his death “murder.”

Hartin and hubby Andrew Ashcroft, whose powerful father is billionaire Lord Ashcroft, at the opening of their new resort.
Hartin and hubby Andrew Ashcroft, whose powerful father is billionaire Lord Ashcroft, at the opening of their new resort. PHOTO BY ALAIA RESORT /FACEBOOK
Hartin’s efforts to win bail have been torpedoed because she is considered a flight risk. Besides, they allege, she killed a cop.

According to the Daily Mail, the adjustment to jail for Hartin hasn’t been pretty.

One former jailbird told the newspaper the socialite cursed at jail guards and demanded special treatment. Hartin, the fink said, wasn’t allowed to smoke or access her “pills.”

“I can’t say whether she was doing drugs or what, but she looked really f—– up,” the man told DailyMail.com.


No matter. Hartin is now caged in Hattieville Prison on the mainland. It is said to be violent, filthy and honeycombed with vermin.

Back home in Eastern Ontario, not much is happening. The lockdown is still in effect but the weather has been nice and it is getting nicer.

Quiet, sure. But it beats being caged in a foreign prison.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
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HUNTER: Canadian mom implicated in Belize cop killing liked 'ass-shaking moves'
Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Jun 04, 2021 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 7 Comments
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin could face 25 years in prison.
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin could face 25 years in prison. PHOTO BY ALAIA RESORT /FACEBOOK
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Francesca Matus liked Belize a lot.

Every November, the Keswick mother of two would hop on a plane to the sun and sand of her happy place and stay there until May.


On her last trip, she didn’t make it home. Instead, she and her American boyfriend were murdered and dumped in a sugar cane field. Their 2017 murders remain unsolved.

Another Canadian woman, Jasmine Hartin, loved Belize too.

Now, the 32-year-old socialite who is in a common-law relationship with the son of Belize’s richest man is languishing in horrid Hattieville Prison accused of shooting to death a cop.

San Pedro Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott was shot to death last Friday.
San Pedro Police Superintendent Henry Jemmott was shot to death last Friday. PHOTO BY SAN PEDRO POLICE /FACEBOOK
What went down May 28 on a pier on the island of San Pedro remains a mystery. There has been a slew of conflicting reports and statements.

Sources told The Toronto Sun that already Lord Michael Ashcroft and his son Andrew may be trying to distance themselves from Hartin by pointing out the couple are, in fact, not married.

She is, however, the mother of the younger Ashcroft’s two young children.

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While she remains an enigma, Hartin grew up in the area of Kingston, Ont., before taking to the road. A Calgary Herald glamour shot shows her at a society function in Cowtown.

The Crazy House Bar N Kitchen was the favored watering hole of Jasmine Hartin.
The Crazy House Bar N Kitchen was the favored watering hole of Jasmine Hartin. PHOTO BY CRAZY HOUSE /FACEBOOK
And her family — some are also in Manitoba and Alberta — appear to have deep ties to Belize, particularly the country’s wild west real estate business.

What the cops allege is that early last Friday, Hartin was drinking with Ashcroft family friend, San Pedro Police Supt. Henry Jemmott, 42, on an island pier.

There was a gun, maybe some cocaine and death. Jemmott was killed by a bullet fired from his service Glock.

They found Hartin covered in blood. She is now jailed without bail and charged with negligent manslaughter.

His family claims it was murder.

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Originally from Eastern Ontario, socialite Jasmine Hartin is now in jail charged with manslaughter in the shooting death of a police superintendent.
HUNTER: Canadian mom jailed in Belize after high-ranking cop shot dead
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin poses with one of her guns.
Canadian socialite charged in slaying of Belize police boss
Francesca Matus was murdered in Belize in 2017. FACEBOOK
HUNTER: No answers on 2017 Belize murder of Keswick woman

While Hartin’s background in Canada is somewhat fuzzy, a clearer picture is emerging in Belize of a fun-loving woman more at home with the sort of working-class people she grew up with than the nation’s gentry.

According to the Daily Mail, the blond beauty shunned the Central American nation’s high society and instead liked drinking with cops at a watering hole famed for its marijuana-laced cognac.

“Jasmine would come to Crazy House to relax. She was a regular customer for two years. I never had a problem with her,” owner Gene Lopez told the Mail.

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Francesca Matus was slain in Belize. The Keswick mother of two loved it there.
Francesca Matus was slain in Belize. The Keswick mother of two loved it there. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /FACEBOOK
“She would exhale as soon as she walked through the door because she could be herself here. She had a luxurious life but she enjoyed being with locals, she felt more alive.”

Lopez added: “She explained that being rich, you have to be high and mighty, respectful, you can’t be yourself. And she enjoyed life, she enjoyed freedom.”

And she was generous, buying rounds of drinks while doing karaoke renditions of Bob Marley hits.

Lopez claims he did have to warn the socialite several times for climbing onto the counter to “perform ass-shaking” dance moves.

But she would always wait in line to get in, he added. And the barflies loved her: Hartin always picked up the tab.

Hartin, he believes, was “in the wrong place at the wrong time.”


This woman does not sound like a cop killer.

As for Jemmott, he probably died instantly from the bullet lodged behind his ear. His body was found face up about 10 metres from shore.

The impenetrable web surrounding the murders of Francesca Matus and her boyfriend, former U.S. Marine Drew DeVoursney, 36, appear at play once again.

Mix one part money, one part police incompetence and a dollop of corruption and answers seem fleeting.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
 

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Canadian implicated in Belize cop shooting hasn't had visits: Prison worker
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Jun 07, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin poses with one of her guns.
Canadian socialite Jasmine Hartin poses with one of her guns. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /FACEBOOK
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A Canadian woman is leading an especially lonely existence in a notorious Belize jail after being charged in the shooting death of a top cop in the Central America country, according to a prison worker.

Jasmine Hartin, 32, has not been visited by her longtime partner, Andrew Ashcroft — son of British billionaire Lord Michael Ashcroft. Nor has the socialite had visits from other relatives since being locked up in the slammer in May.


“I’ve been here from Monday, all the time that she has been here, and I’m certain that Jasmine hasn’t had any visits from her family,” prison worker Ashburn McPherson told the U.K. Sun.

“A friend came by on Saturday morning and he said she was a family friend,” the worker added. “Her lawyer, Godfrey Smith, also came during the week and brought her some cash — $500 — and clothes.”

Added McPherson: “Jasmine looked normal when I saw her, well put together and nice. She was wearing her own clothes, long pants and a blouse.”

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Originally from Eastern Ontario, socialite Jasmine Hartin is now in jail charged with manslaughter.
Originally from Eastern Ontario, socialite Jasmine Hartin is now in jail charged with manslaughter. PHOTO BY ALAIA RESORT /FACEBOOK
The Canadian-born Hartin confessed to authorities that she was practising loading a Glock handgun when it went off and killed San Pedro Supt. Henry Jemmott on a pier May 28 after a night of drinking, according to a Daily Mail report.

Hartin, who has ties to various parts of Canada, said her police pal suggested she buy a gun after she attended a party one week earlier in Belmopan where a man had been aggressive toward her.

Jasmine Hartin enjoys Paris.
Jasmine Hartin enjoys Paris. PHOTO BY JASMINE HARTIN /FACEBOOK
“He made me unload the bullets from his gun and reload them, time and again, to practise for when I eventually got my gun license and my own gun,” Hartin reportedly told investigators.


She was detained and later charged with manslaughter by negligence.
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BLUE TEARS: City says goodbye to hero cop Jeffrey Northrup
Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Publishing date:Jul 12, 2021 • 9 hours ago • 4 minute read • 16 Comments
The hearse carrying the casket of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup arrives for his funeral in Toronto, on July 12, 2021.
The hearse carrying the casket of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup arrives for his funeral in Toronto, on July 12, 2021. PHOTO BY THE CANADIAN PRESS /Toronto Sun
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A tsunami of blue tears washed over the city on Monday as Toronto said goodbye to a true hero.

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Thousands of cops and civilians lined the streets for the funeral of Det.-Const. Jeffrey Northrup, who was murdered in the line of duty early on July 2.


Northrup, 55, a married father of three — aged 21, 19, and 17 — had served the city as a Toronto police officer for 31 years.

A final tribute for Northrup was held at BMO Field under an overcast sky with attendance curtailed because of COVID-19.

He was the 40th Toronto officer killed in the line of duty since 1900. Northrup was responding to a robbery report in an underground parking lot at Toronto City Hall when detectives say he was intentionally struck by a vehicle.

For the great and the good, and the public at large, the loss of a cop described as relentlessly cheerful was a devastating blow.

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For his family, his loss is unspeakable.

In her eulogy, Northrup’s wife Margaret revealed the pair “met in jail” while he worked as a court officer, and she gave inmates their meds.

“It was love at first sight,” she told mourners. “He loved life to the fullest.”

And, she added, Northrup also loved his job: “Ridiculously so.”

At home, he was a caring, empathetic partner and father, always ready to lend a hand whether it was the Special Olympics, lacrosse or the scouting movement.

“Your daddy loved you all so much,” Margaret told her children as tears streamed down her face. “Jeffy … boo bear… I am so grateful to have had you in my life for 28 years.”

A photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup.
A photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup.
The procession departed Thornhill at 10:30 a.m., made its way down Yonge St., before heading west on Dundas St. W., passing 52 Division, where Northrup worked. Members of the public lined the route.

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Representatives from more than 50 different organizations — some from police services as far away as Calgary, Edmonton, Quebec, and Vancouver — attended the service.

Premier Doug Ford’s voice cracked with emotion as he touched on the terrible tragedy.

“He put his life on the line in order to serve and protect his community, and this is a debt that we will never be able to repay. So we will remain in debt to his service and always honour his sacrifice,” Ford said.

“Jeff was one of the best amongst us and a credit to the duty of policing.”

Also speaking was Toronto Mayor John Tory, who arrived at 52 Division in the immediate aftermath of Northrup’s slaying.

“To Jeff Northrup: Thank you for being a good person, for being a good family man, and for being a good police officer,” Tory said.

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“You were a peacemaker and a peace officer. May your life of service be blessed and may you rest in peace knowing that your colleagues and all of the people who you served with such care and such distinction are eternally grateful for your humanity and for your services.”

An undercurrent to the service was strained relations between the police and some of the city’s communities. Northrup, his fellow officers suggested, was the sort of cop the service needs most right now.

Toronto Police Chief James Ramer encouraged the officers of his heartbroken service to carry on for Northrup.

“Jeff was a genuinely lovely and caring man who was fair and friendly to everyone he encountered as a police officer,” Ramer said.

“When he was off duty, he was a selfless and kind neighbour, a mentor, and a coach, beloved by everyone. Most importantly, he was a dedicated family man to his wife and three children, whom he adored, whom were his life.”

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Ramer added: “When our confidence waivers, we must think about Jeff, about his unshakable commitment to the city and his family.”


Cops who knew Northrup best described him as a “gentle giant” who would arrive at work with brownies he’d just baked.

“Early morning day shifts often started quite early for Jeff, far earlier than the schedule dictated,” his 52 Division boss, Supt. Greg Cole, told mourners.

“You would get to work a half-hour early expecting to be the first person there. Instead, Jeff was already there sitting at his desk typing away at a case. He would greet you with a warm inviting smile and you would sit down and immediately notice that the office was gleaming. That was because Jeff had mopped the floor prior to your arrival,” said Cole. “Then a smell would hit you, a smell that felt comforting, felt like home. That is when you would realize a pot of his signature chili was simmering in the slow cooker.

Cole added: “That was Jeff and his day wouldn’t start there. It started at home where his heart was. Many early day shifts would see Jeff wake up a few hours after midnight so he could do a load of laundry for the family and make lunches.”

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A police officer reacts as he arrives for the funeral of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup in Toronto on Monday, July 12, 2021. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
A police officer reacts as he arrives for the funeral of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup in Toronto on Monday, July 12, 2021. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
The hearse carrying the casket of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup arrives for his funeral in Toronto, on Monday, July 12, 2021.
The hearse carrying the casket of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup arrives for his funeral in Toronto, on Monday, July 12, 2021. Photo by Chris Young /THE CANADIAN PRESS
An early photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup.
An early photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup. Photo by TPS /Twitter
A photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup.
A photo of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup.
A police officer holds the cap of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup as a hearse bearing his casket arrives for his funeral in Toronto on Monday, July 12, 2021.
A police officer holds the cap of Toronto Police Const. Jeffrey Northrup as a hearse bearing his casket arrives for his funeral in Toronto on Monday, July 12, 2021. Photo by Chris Young /THE CANADIAN PRESS
Members of the Toronto Police service form a procession for the funeral of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup on Monday July 12, 2021. Police say that Const. Northrup was killed in a deliberate act while investigating a robbery in the parking lot at Toronto City Hall last week. A 31 year old man has been charged with first degree murder. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Members of the Toronto Police service form a procession for the funeral of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup on Monday July 12, 2021. Police say that Const. Northrup was killed in a deliberate act while investigating a robbery in the parking lot at Toronto City Hall last week. A 31 year old man has been charged with first degree murder. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Members of the Toronto Police service form a procession for the funeral of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup on Monday July 12, 2021.
Members of the Toronto Police service form a procession for the funeral of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup on Monday July 12, 2021. Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS /Chris Young
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On Monday, carrying the veteran cop’s hat was his partner, Det. Const. Lisa Forbes, who was injured in the tragic encounter that killed Northrup.

So far, detectives have been tight-lipped about what went down in that underground garage on July 2 other than Ramer describing the attack as “intentional and deliberate”. Police have so far not suggested a motive.

Little is known about the accused killer, Umar Zameer, 31, who has been charged with first-degree murder. He has been remanded in custody until his next court appearance on July 23.

The Northrup family has established a GoFundMe to help Margaret and her children Brennen, Samantha and Mitchell.

Plans called for Northrup to be buried at a private ceremony attended by close friends and family.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
 

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More than 4,000 officers say goodbye to Det.-Const. Jeffrey Northrup
Author of the article:Kevin Connor
Publishing date:Jul 12, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Margaret Northrup is framed by the door of a hearse as she holds the police cap that belonged to her husband, Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup.
Margaret Northrup is framed by the door of a hearse as she holds the police cap that belonged to her husband, Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup. PHOTO BY THE CANADIAN PRESS /Toronto Sun
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More than 4,000 police officers from across the country marched in a procession Monday in honour of Det.-Const. Jeffrey Northrup.

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Northrup, 55, was killed on July 2 while answering a robbery call in the underground parking lot of City Hall when he was struck by a vehicle. A 31-year-old man has been charged with first-degree murder.


Service members marched along Lakeshore Blvd., turned left onto Canada Blvd. and then along Princes’ Blvd.

Many of the people who turned up to view were shocked by the lack of public attendance.

Laurie Brander, whose husband is a 17-year veteran of the Toronto Police, said she was “shocked” by the small public turnout for the procession.

“People are walking their dogs or running, and they don’t know what is going on. It’s unfortunate that the streets are empty. It’s really sad,” Brander said.

Glen Grant said it was important for people to pay their respects.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

The hearse carrying the casket of Toronto Police officer Jeffrey Northrup arrives for his funeral in Toronto, on July 12, 2021.
BLUE TEARS: City says goodbye to hero cop Jeffrey Northrup
Officers escorted fallen officer Detective Constable Jeffrey Northrup to the funeral home
Details of funeral for Const. Jeffrey Northrup finalized
Toronto Police carry Const. Jeffrey Northrup's casket into the Kane-Jerrett Funeral Home in Thornhill on July 4, 2021.
'I'LL BE THERE': Police officer's widow offers support to Northrup family

“It is sad people are going about their business and not stopping for this,” Grant said.

Richard Dunwoody said being in attendance was “the right thing to do.”

“I think many aren’t here because of the pandemic. I think most will be watching it on TV,” Dunwoody said.
 

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Police officer killed in exchange of gunfire outside U.S. Pentagon
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Aug 03, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Law enforcement officers gather near the entrance of the Pentagon after a report of an active shooter and lockdown in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021.
Law enforcement officers gather near the entrance of the Pentagon after a report of an active shooter and lockdown in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021. PHOTO BY OLIVIER DOULIERY /AFP via Getty Images
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WASHINGTON — A police officer protecting the Pentagon was killed outside the building in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday, U.S. Senator Mark Warner said.

Chief Woodrow Kusse, head of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, said there were multiple injuries in an exchange of gunfire at a public bus stop but declined to say if anyone was killed.


Kusse declined to speculate on the motive or to say whether the assailant was in custody but added that authorities were not actively looking for one.

He said the FBI was assisting in the investigation.

Warner said he was saddened to learn about a Pentagon police officer being killed on Tuesday “in a senseless act of violence.”

The building was briefly put on lockdown as police responded to the incident.
 

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Police officer killed in exchange of gunfire outside U.S. Pentagon
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Aug 03, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Law enforcement officers gather near the entrance of the Pentagon after a report of an active shooter and lockdown in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021.
Law enforcement officers gather near the entrance of the Pentagon after a report of an active shooter and lockdown in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021. PHOTO BY OLIVIER DOULIERY /AFP via Getty Images
Article content
WASHINGTON — A police officer protecting the Pentagon was killed outside the building in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday, U.S. Senator Mark Warner said.

Chief Woodrow Kusse, head of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, said there were multiple injuries in an exchange of gunfire at a public bus stop but declined to say if anyone was killed.


Kusse declined to speculate on the motive or to say whether the assailant was in custody but added that authorities were not actively looking for one.

He said the FBI was assisting in the investigation.

Warner said he was saddened to learn about a Pentagon police officer being killed on Tuesday “in a senseless act of violence.”

The building was briefly put on lockdown as police responded to the incident.
Insurrection anyone?