When Dems are in power

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
45,080
430
83
Washington DC
Notice she didn't say anything about nuclear and that's probably the best route to go. Get rid of the windmills and solar panels - they're ugly and not practical in any event. Hopefully someone with some intestinal fortitude will look at the nuclear option. We can only hope....
While I generally agree with you on the value of nuclear fission as a source of energy, it's not without its dangers.
 

NZDoug

Council Member
Jul 18, 2017
1,901
31
48
Big Bay, Awhitu, New Zealand
“On the de-Trumpification of America: It definitely won't be easy, but it must be done
Defeating Donald Trump might be the easy part. Uprooting the toxic movement he represents could take decades”
…………………………
The fall of the Soviet Union is remembered by many as the end of a bad idea — the idea that a one-party state can violently suppress its citizens in the name of the collective good. The "Fall of America" moment [caused by the pandemic] is of a different nature. It can be understood, not as the end of a bad idea, but rather as the pyrrhic victory of a whole set of bad ideas long present in U.S. culture which have grown to define the country in the last few decades.
The ideas Hughes cited were that "inequality is good," that "religious freedom [so-called] trumps public good," that "in the Civil War, the wrong side won," the myth of "American exceptionalism," i.e., "the idea that the U.S. is a unique, morally-superior civilization destined to guide the world" and "the myth of redemptive violence," meaning "the belief that good can triumph over evil only by means of conflict." These can all be seen as different forms of narcissistic fantasy and, more specifically, collective narcissistic fantasy. The more we cling to such fantasies, the more our shadow grows.One of those bad ideas ties directly to one of Feffer's three examples, that of "Reconstruction after the American Civil War," and the failure of that process created the historical foundation on which Trumpism is built.
The lesson Feffer draws is a tough one: "Today's Republicans, the equivalent of the northern Democrats of the post-Civil War era and a true confederacy of dunces, cannot be allowed to persist in their current incarnation as a vehicle for Trumpism." To avoid that, "the next administration would have to drain the swamp Trump created, bring criminal charges against the former president and his key followers, and launch a serious campaign to change the hearts and minds of Americans who have been drawn to this president's agenda."
To accomplish that, he concludes, "it's imperative to separate the legitimate grievances of Trump supporters from the illegitimate ones," and both must be addressed in different ways.
This is the strongest aspect of Feffer's argument — which is not to say it will be easy to pull off. Bringing charges against Trump may well be justified on multiple grounds, but doing so itself threatens democratic norms: The winners don't throw the losers in jail, not in fully-functioning healthy democracies. But "no one is above the law" is also a central norm — a norm previously violated when Gerald Ford pardoned Richard Nixon, and that came back to bite us in a big way with the rise of Trump. Clearly, this needs to be carefully thought through, and a professional, non-political investigation into Trump's actual or potential crimes will be required.
more
https://www.salon.com/2020/08/01/on...-definitely-wont-be-easy-but-it-must-be-done/
 

Walter

Hall of Fame Member
Jan 28, 2007
34,824
70
48
“On the de-Trumpification of America: It definitely won't be easy, but it must be done
Defeating Donald Trump might be the easy part. Uprooting the toxic movement he represents could take decades”
…………………………
The fall of the Soviet Union is remembered by many as the end of a bad idea — the idea that a one-party state can violently suppress its citizens in the name of the collective good. The "Fall of America" moment [caused by the pandemic] is of a different nature. It can be understood, not as the end of a bad idea, but rather as the pyrrhic victory of a whole set of bad ideas long present in U.S. culture which have grown to define the country in the last few decades.
The ideas Hughes cited were that "inequality is good," that "religious freedom [so-called] trumps public good," that "in the Civil War, the wrong side won," the myth of "American exceptionalism," i.e., "the idea that the U.S. is a unique, morally-superior civilization destined to guide the world" and "the myth of redemptive violence," meaning "the belief that good can triumph over evil only by means of conflict." These can all be seen as different forms of narcissistic fantasy and, more specifically, collective narcissistic fantasy. The more we cling to such fantasies, the more our shadow grows.One of those bad ideas ties directly to one of Feffer's three examples, that of "Reconstruction after the American Civil War," and the failure of that process created the historical foundation on which Trumpism is built.
The lesson Feffer draws is a tough one: "Today's Republicans, the equivalent of the northern Democrats of the post-Civil War era and a true confederacy of dunces, cannot be allowed to persist in their current incarnation as a vehicle for Trumpism." To avoid that, "the next administration would have to drain the swamp Trump created, bring criminal charges against the former president and his key followers, and launch a serious campaign to change the hearts and minds of Americans who have been drawn to this president's agenda."
To accomplish that, he concludes, "it's imperative to separate the legitimate grievances of Trump supporters from the illegitimate ones," and both must be addressed in different ways.
This is the strongest aspect of Feffer's argument — which is not to say it will be easy to pull off. Bringing charges against Trump may well be justified on multiple grounds, but doing so itself threatens democratic norms: The winners don't throw the losers in jail, not in fully-functioning healthy democracies. But "no one is above the law" is also a central norm — a norm previously violated when Gerald Ford pardoned Richard Nixon, and that came back to bite us in a big way with the rise of Trump. Clearly, this needs to be carefully thought through, and a professional, non-political investigation into Trump's actual or potential crimes will be required.
more
https://www.salon.com/2020/08/01/on...-definitely-wont-be-easy-but-it-must-be-done/
Classic TDS.
 

Cliffy

Standing Member
Nov 19, 2008
44,851
187
63
Nakusp, BC
When the Dems are in power, they spend their whole tenure trying to fixing the economic and social phuk-ups the Repuckians left for them. It's the same in Canada with the Liberals and the Conservatives. Right wingers do not know how to handle money.
 

Walter

Hall of Fame Member
Jan 28, 2007
34,824
70
48
When the Dems are in power, they spend their whole tenure trying to fixing the economic and social phuk-ups the Repuckians left for them. It's the same in Canada with the Liberals and the Conservatives. Right wingers do not know how to handle money.
Prog delusion.
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
16,365
2,565
113
Twin Moose Creek
Nancy Pelosi 'decimated' by Republicans after video shows her in hair salon without face mask

Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has come under fire after she was spotted inside a San Francisco hair salon not wearing a face mask.

Video obtained by Fox News shows the politician inside the premises of eSalon on Monday, breaking city rules that hair salon services can only be conducted outdoors. Pelosi was also seen wearing a mask around her neck rather than over her mouth, while a stylist who was following her wore the mask on their nose and mouth.

Pelosi’s hair is wet in the video and she looks to be wearing a robe.

The owner of eSalon on Union Street told Fox News a stylist who rents space there contacted her Sunday to say Pelosi would be coming in the following day.

“It was a slap in the face that she went in, you know, that she feels that she can just go and get her stuff done while no one else can go in, and I can’t work,” salon owner Erica Kious said of the politician.

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Outdoor haircuts were allowed in California as of Tuesday but indoor salons remain shut.

However Drew Hamill, a spokesperson for Pelosi said that the business had offered for Pelosi to come in on Monday and told her “they were allowed by the city to have one customer at a time in the business. “The Speaker complied with the rules as presented to her by this establishment,” he added.

Pelosi has been known for admonishing Republicans, especially U.S. President Donald Trump for not wearing a mask during the pandemic. After her Monday appointment, she appeared on MSNBC and told the network that Trump had “slapped science right in the face” after he allowed a mostly mask-less audience to watch his speech to the Republic convention from the White House lawn.

Now several Republicans, including Trump have deemed her a hypocrite. “Crazy Nanci Pelosi is being decimated for having a beauty parlor opened … and for not wearing a Mask — despite constantly lecturing everyone else,” Trump tweeted.

Harmeet Dhillon, a San Francisco-based Republican national committeewoman, called for the local district attorney to investigate Pelosi, according to Mercury News .

“If Speaker Pelosi can get her hair done in San Francisco indoors, no mask, while other Californians were forced to get theirs outdoors in 100+ degree heat and dangerous levels of smoke, then everyone should be able to,” Dhillon said.

“Others have been cited and sued and prosecuted by the state for similar offenses. We await the San Francisco District Attorney’s charging decision — unless, of course, the speaker is above the very law she loudly proclaims others must follow.”

Now she is claiming it was a set up after the salon owner said there is no single client rule for the salon, salon owner rebutted this as well by explaining the appointment was made just the day before.
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
16,365
2,565
113
Twin Moose Creek
Fake news, nothing to see here, poor bookkeeping, and then indicted

Rochester mayor indicted in campaign finance probe

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren was indicted Friday on charges she broke campaign finance rules and committed fraud during her reelection campaign three years ago, adding another layer of crisis in a city that has been reeling over its handling over a police killing.

Monroe County District Attorney Sandra Doorley also announced charges against Warren’s campaign treasurer, Albert Jones Jr., and the treasurer of her political action committee, Rosalind Brooks-Harris.

The indictment dramatically increases political peril for Warren, who was already facing calls to resign for the city’s handling of the suffocation of Daniel Prude. The Democrat is midway through her second term as the first female and second Black mayor of Rochester, a city of more than 200,000 by Lake Ontario.

State Board of Elections investigators had previously concluded there was “considerable evidence” that Warren, her associates and a political action committee supporting her campaign took steps to intentionally evade campaign donation limits, according to local media reports.

Doorley said Warren and the others took steps to evade contribution limits between Nov. 6, 2013 and Nov. 7, 2017.

“The indictment alleges that it was not a mistake,” Doorley told reporters.

Warren had previously denied any attempt to evade campaign finance rules, blamed errors on sloppy bookkeeping and referred to the investigation as a “political witch hunt.” Her lawyer didn't immediately return phone and email messages seeking comment Friday.

Her arraignment, on charges of scheming to defraud and violating election laws, was scheduled for Monday. If convicted, she would be removed from office.

Demonstrators have been calling for reforms and top-level resignations in Rochester since videos were released in September of Prude being handcuffed by officers on a city street. Officers put a hood over his head to stop him from spitting, then held him down for about two minutes until he stopped breathing. He died a week later after he was taken off life support.

The body-camera video was taken early on the morning of March 23, but wasn’t released until five months later after an open records request by Prude’s family.

Critics accused police and city officials of covering up Prude’s killing, though Warren said she had no idea the medical examiner ruled his death a homicide until Aug. 4, when she saw the video.
 

Cliffy

Standing Member
Nov 19, 2008
44,851
187
63
Nakusp, BC