Two years into the Trudeau 2.0 Minority Term, which day will Justin call the election that only he wants?

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Minister Dominic LeBlanc unveiled a suite of changes to the Elections Act on Wednesday, including expanded days for advance voting and an easier process for mail-in ballots, but it would also move the current proposed fixed election day from Oct. 20 to OCT 27th, 2024!!

LeBlanc said overall the bill was about strengthening democracy. The one-week delay has a significant impact on MP pensions, however…

MPs receive a pension, but in order to be vested in the plan they must have at least six years of service. Any MP elected in 2019 would need to have reached that six-year mark if the election was held on Oct. 20, 2025, but will have reached that cut-off on OCT 27th, the new proposed date.

Leblanc’s spokesperson, Jean-Sébastien Comeau, said the change to the election day is not about pensions. That is all.
 
  • Angry
Reactions: Taxslave2

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,745
7,041
113
B.C.
Minister Dominic LeBlanc unveiled a suite of changes to the Elections Act on Wednesday, including expanded days for advance voting and an easier process for mail-in ballots, but it would also move the current proposed fixed election day from Oct. 20 to OCT 27th, 2024!!

LeBlanc said overall the bill was about strengthening democracy. The one-week delay has a significant impact on MP pensions, however…

MPs receive a pension, but in order to be vested in the plan they must have at least six years of service. Any MP elected in 2019 would need to have reached that six-year mark if the election was held on Oct. 20, 2025, but will have reached that cut-off on OCT 27th, the new proposed date.

Leblanc’s spokesperson, Jean-Sébastien Comeau, said the change to the election day is not about pensions. That is all.
Definitely not about pensions. Nope not even a consideration.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Definitely not about pensions. Nope not even a consideration.
The fact that this also benefits the conservatives is just collateral damage and serendipity for the Liberal/NDP & NDP/Liberals. Just look at who voted for and against this…

If an election were held today, a lot of Liberal MPs would lose their seats – including many of the 22 first elected in 2019. The NDP is also in danger of losing seats in the next election, but the Bloc could hold their support or even gain seats based on current polling.

So, if you are a Liberal, NDP or Bloc MP, you don’t want to go to an election until October 2025 and the later the better.

There are 32 Conservative MPs, 22 Liberals, 20 Bloc Quebecois and six New Democrats who were elected in the 2019 election and are still sitting. To qualify for their pension after six years of service, they need to be MPs until October 21, 2025, which is one day after the currently scheduled election.

(Now, if you are one of the 32 Conservative MPs who is just shy of being vested in your pension, you probably aren’t worried based on the current polling. If an election were held today, the Conservatives would win a massive majority government and those 32 MPs would most likely be re-elected)

1711207981378.jpeg

By moving the date of Canada’s next fixed election date from Oct. 20, 2025, to one-week later Trudeau is ensuring he will stay in power until that date. Get used to having Justin Trudeau remain as prime minister – a proposed change to Canada’s election law means he’s staying put.

The Trudeau government has denied that this change to the election act has anything to do with pensions. Government spokesperson Jean-Sébastien Comeau said the change to the election day is not about pensions and instead about “protecting the integrity of federal elections.”
This one week change all but guarantees Trudeau staying in power. None of the three parties will want to risk not only losing seats but also losing money for their MPs.

(NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, who signed the coalition deal with Justin Trudeau, gets vested in his pension by February 2025, six years after he won a by-election. His payout could be as much as $2.3 million over his lifetime)
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
So. . . benefits both sides isn't a good thing. Got it.
Benefits, both sides how? Do you mean any benefits both the Liberal & NDP (?) which are basically the same side?

Do you mean it benefits the Liberal/NDP & the Bloc (?) who both voted for it? I guess it does.

Do you mean at benefits the Liberal/NDP/Bloc & all BOTH Green MP’s? I could see that.

Do you mean it benefits the the Conservatives & Liberal/NDP/Bloc/Green? It doesn’t really in this scenario. For all intents and purposes, how would this benefit the conservatives if that’s what you mean?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Well….When you look at the scoreboard, pretty much every conservative MP currently in Parliament will probably still be in Parliament after (as of this Bill c-65) October 27th (instead of 20th), 2025. On that note, this change is irrelevant at best for that one Canadian political party near the center/right.

Whom do you think voted against this bill in its first reading? I can give you a hint if you would like?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,840
1,733
113
Well, there was this guy who said
Except it really doesn't It is highly unlikely any of the conservatives will lose their seats, while it is probably that most of the liberalndp members will lose not only their seats but a golden retirement. Probably the two greens will remain, and the blocheads are difficult to predict.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Except it really doesn't It is highly unlikely any of the conservatives will lose their seats, while it is probably that most of the liberalndp members will lose not only their seats but a golden retirement. Probably the two greens will remain, and the blocheads are difficult to predict.
The block will probably pick up seats, in the vacuum of decimating the liberal and NDP parties, of those that live live in Quebec, but cannot vote for a party that will benefit the rest of Canadians outside of Quebec. I would expect the block to come out significantly stronger than it is now…but it will still be just a party in Quebec for Quebec that has federal standing in parliament.
1711211529405.jpeg
(The BQ had 32 seats after the 2021 election, & I’m predicting they’ll be in the mid-40’s after 2025’s Oct 27th election)
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
What kind of relationship do you think Poilievre will have with Trump, if they're both elected?
The same as any other American President and Canadian Prime Minister more or less. Subservient as the tail on the dog. Canada has 1/11th the population of the USA, & is physically connected to exactly one country and that is….America….& is separated by an Ocean from any other trade partner.

It would be the same relationship if Biden (or Harris? Or whomever…?) is elected, wouldn’t it? Less faux pas and better international relations that we could expect with Trudeau/Singh I’d assume regardless of whom leads America next.

Do you see it otherwise? Just curious. I can’t picture Poilievre dressing in Bollywood costumes in India or Blackface in Arkansas for example, or preaching to the Italian Prime Minister about gender whatever at an economic conference for example.

What kind of Relationship do you think Trudeau will have with Biden if they are both reelected?:
1711214756193.jpeg
Or a Trudeau/Trump future relationship?:
1711214903417.jpeg
Or a Trudeau/Harris relationship?:
1711215038246.jpeg
…& once out of political office, I don’t even know if Jagmeet Singh would be allowed into the US, would he? I believe he is persona non grata in India.
 

bob the dog

Council Member
Aug 14, 2020
1,193
935
113
What kind of relationship do you think Poilievre will have with Trump, if they're both elected?
I don't see a lot of focus on that relationship given that there are so many other variables prioritized. If the economy responds well they will both be heros. Of course Canada will know it's place.

Trump did not seem overly impressed with Trudeau or Freeland during the NAFTA talks of a few years ago. Canada won't occupy too much of his time.
 

bob the dog

Council Member
Aug 14, 2020
1,193
935
113
The block will probably pick up seats, in the vacuum of decimating the liberal and NDP parties, of those that live live in Quebec, but cannot vote for a party that will benefit the rest of Canadians outside of Quebec. I would expect the block to come out significantly stronger than it is now…but it will still be just a party in Quebec for Quebec that has federal standing in parliament.
View attachment 21519
(The BQ had 32 seats after the 2021 election, & I’m predicting they’ll be in the mid-40’s after 2025’s Oct 27th election)
Could easily be a block of 40 -50 Western Coalition seats as well if someone could put it together. Let the West vote for themselves.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Could easily be a block of 40 -50 Western Coalition seats as well if someone could put it together. Let the West vote for themselves.
If necessary, which five years ago the potential was there, but currently (OK, in 18 months of so) I don’t think it will be necessary. The West (& East, & Maritimes, etc…) should have a voice in this next government I am truly hoping.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,840
1,733
113
Could easily be a block of 40 -50 Western Coalition seats as well if someone could put it together. Let the West vote for themselves.
Don't need a coalition in the West. it will be solid Conservative with a few areas of city freeloaders vote dipper or green.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Twin_Moose

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Don't need a coalition in the West. it will be solid Conservative with a few areas of city freeloaders vote dipper or green.
Couple in Vancouver, I think one in Edmonton, maybe a few in Winnipeg…& that brings us to the GTA going from West to east. Maybe a few in the Maritimes…& maybe some protest votes for them in Quebec. Probably the territories. I’m guessing 12-14 seats between the NDP & Greens.
1711225399129.jpeg
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,548
8,267
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Under the existing terms of Canadian electoral law, Canada’s next mandatory general election date is Oct. 20, 2025 — a function of the Elections Act requiring a general election to be held “on the third Monday of October in the fourth calendar year following polling day for the last general election.”

The revision — contained in a package of proposed amendments — is a one-time change (for democracy) moving the date one week later, to Oct. 27.

The stated reason for this is so election day won’t fall amidst Diwali, the five-day Hindu festival of lights….’cuz Diwali!!

But shifting the date also ensures that a number of MPs first elected in 2019 — many of whom are NDPers or Liberals projected to lose in 2025 — will just pass the six-year threshold required to qualify for a lifetime parliamentary pension that starts as early as age 55…but this is probably just a coincidence.

This includes Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault, Treasury Board President Anita Anand and both Heather McPherson and Matthew Green, the NDP MPs who were the loudest champions of Monday’s attempt to have Canada recognize Palestinian statehood. Among the other potential beneficiaries of the change are Jaime Battiste, parliamentary secretary to the minister of Crown-Indigenous relations. And Jenica Atwin, who recently made headlines after a constituent emailed her about synagogue vandalism in her riding, and she replied with a lament about Gazan “atrocities.”

Many of the MPs represent relatively close ridings that are not projected to fare well amid plummeting electoral support for Liberal/NDP’s and NDP/Liberal MPs. For context, these MPs all won re-election in 2021 when the Liberals’ share of the popular vote was 32.62 per cent as compared to 33.74 per cent for the Conservatives.

The latest available polls show that the next election will likely see the Conservatives capture 42 per cent to the Liberals’ 24 per cent — a blowout result expected to slash as many as 100 seats from the Liberal caucus…& the NDP are going lose about 1/2 of their current seats too is my prediction.

As the 2019 federal election was held on Oct. 21, this means that any MPs first elected at that time won’t qualify for the pension until Oct. 21, 2025 — exactly one day after the previously scheduled date of the 2025 election….but this is about Diwali, ‘cuz Diwali!! Notably, the date change will not make any difference to the pension eligibility of NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, ‘cuz Diwali & he only has to make it until Spring 2025 with the Confidence Agreement for his pension.
1711270725339.jpegThe cost to taxpayers of the one-week delay could easily stretch into the tens of millions of dollars.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: Twin_Moose

IdRatherBeSkiing

Satelitte Radio Addict
May 28, 2007
14,640
2,385
113
Toronto, ON
That's true as well but employers are also "supposed" to allow their employees time off to vote. I've never had to use the time off because, as you stated, there are many opportunities to vote & no reason not to.
I think they are supposed to allow you 3 hours off to vote. If you polling station is open til 9pm and your work is 9am-5pm, you have a 4 hour window so they would not be required to give you any more time.