Taxpayers footing Big Oils' Cleanup of Oil and Gas Wells

B00Mer

If you're explaining, you're losing..
Sep 6, 2008
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Taxpayers footing Big Oils' Cleanup of Oil and Gas Wells



 

Nick Danger

Council Member
Jul 21, 2013
1,512
283
83
Penticton, BC
Are you aware of Reclamation Bonds?
Weren’t there similar obligations in place for the now “orphaned” gas and oil wells ?

The “progress” made so far on reclamation can be best described as window dressing. A handful of acres in high visibility settings.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,433
4,546
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Moccasin Flats
No. There are thousands upon thousands in Sask abandoned by Shell and Imperial when they fled to Alberta from Tommy "The Commie" Douglas' and his bizarre eugenicist, socialistic behavior.

The bitch of it being the majority were viable.

Why reclaim if you aren't done?

Pay attention, the mined areas are the REE mines of the near future.

If you can't keep up, please don't bitch.

Analyzing the Rare Earth Elements (REEs) and Trace Metals in Tailings​

Authors​

  • Rachel ButlerWISEST Student Researcher, University of Alberta
  • Deepak PudasaineeDepartment of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta
  • Monir Khan, MDDepartment of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta
  • Rajender GuptaDepartment of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta

DOI:​

https://doi.org/10.29173/aar54

Keywords:​

bitumen, froth treatment tailings, Gupta lab, rare earth elements, trace metals, oil sands, TGA, alberta, chemical engineering

ABSTRACT​

In the process of producing bitumen from oil sand, a by-product called tailings is produced. Tailings are a mixture of clay, fine particles, water, solvent and residual bitumen. The industry’s current approach is to leave them in tailings ponds; however, that may cause environmental impacts to the ecosystems around them due in part to the toxic trace metals found in them. Research has shown that there are also valuable rare Earth elements (REEs) present in tailings. REEs found in tailings include Cerium, Neodymium, Lanthanum etc. Iron, Titanium, and Zirconium are not considered REEs but are still valuable enough to be extracted. The objective of this research was to determine the concentration of REEs and trace metals in bitumen froth treatment tailings (FTT). Our research team used acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) to measure the concentration of REEs and trace metals in several samples of FTT ash. We learned that Cerium was the most prevalent REE in tailings samples (>1000ppm), followed by Neodymium and Lanthanum. Zirconium was the most prevalent trace metal found in this tailings sample (>1000ppm), followed closely by Vanadium. Knowing the exact concentration of harmful trace metals in tailings will allow us to determine the extent of tailings ponds environmental effect and toxicity. Collecting and selling expensive metals found in tailings could be the start of a new precious metals economy in Alberta, which would provide new investment opportunities and jobs. This would also encourage corporations to invest in finding new ways to extract these precious metals, resulting in more purified tailings and less tailings overall going into tailings ponds.

 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,433
4,546
113
Moccasin Flats
How long are you going to go on believing "big oil" isn't pimping environmentalists and climate malarkey to get you to fund them into being "big energy"?

Fund oil and make them rich or fund green energy and make them rich.

Take your pick buddy.
 

Nick Danger

Council Member
Jul 21, 2013
1,512
283
83
Penticton, BC
REEs are in their infancy?
The idea of extracting REEs from oilsands tailings is still experimental. A couple of different players have quiet agreements with oilsands producers to see if the idea has any merit. And if their stock prices are any indication there’s nothing really encouraging happening.

The oilsands produces upwards of three million barrels of bitumen daily. How much income potential is there in sifting through their garbage for scraps of exotic elements? I’d be more inclined to believe that oil producers are looking at this as a possible alternative to living up to their reclamation obligations.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,433
4,546
113
Moccasin Flats

Shell's stock price tells you it isn't viable?
 

Nick Danger

Council Member
Jul 21, 2013
1,512
283
83
Penticton, BC
Shell's stock price tells you it isn't viable?
That article is three years old, back before Shell sold off it’s oilsands holdings to CNRL, a corporation notably mentioned as one of the big offenders in reneging on clean-up obligations in BC. Where are they now on their REE recovery plan ? More window dressing.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,433
4,546
113
Moccasin Flats
Riiiight but what they learned was shelved and nobody else is thinking REEs because they just aren't in high demand. Right?


NEW RARE EARTH PROCESSING FACILITY IN SASKATCHEWAN TO SECURE NORTH AMERICAN SUPPLY CHAIN​

DATE POSTED
SEPTEMBER 23, 2020
By Rebecca Gotto
jars of rare earth samples at src

In the coming decade, the need for rare earth elements (REEs) will increase many-fold due to their importance in high-growth technology areas such as wind turbines and electric cars. Canadian rock formations hold 12 per cent of the world’s rare earth elements measured resources. But currently, no REEs are being processed in Canada due to both a Chinese monopoly as supplier and end user, as well as the lack of a fully developed supply chain in North America.
We're looking to change that by securing an early and important piece of the supply chain for industry – a Rare Earth Processing Facility. The $35-million dollar Facility was announced in the summer of 2020 by the Government of Saskatchewan. The Facility will be located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and completion is slated for the fall of 2022.
The Facility, a first-of-its-kind in North America, will begin to establish a REE technology hub in Saskatchewan, forming an industry model for future commercial REE initiatives and supply chain development.

COMMERCIAL PROCESSING PLANT​

A key element of the Facility is a commercial processing plant, which will include concentration and separation stages and treat monazite sands at approximately 60 per cent concentration.
Monazite is a source of mainly so called “light” REEs (especially cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium) which are some of the critical elements for the permanent magnets used in clean technologies. SRC will work with the mining industry to secure this feed stock from across Saskatchewan, Canada and internationally.
An intermediate concentrate of mixed rare earth carbonates will be produced from the Monazite Processing Unit and further processed in a Separation Unit to produce separated rare earth oxides, as the market requires. These will be sold by SRC and further refined and processed to provide the inputs that original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) require.
ree process at src

The treatment capacity of the Unit will be 3000 tonnes per year, producing an initial product: mixed rare earth carbonate. Part of the mixed rare earth carbonate will then be fed to the Separation Unit to produce approximately 500 tonnes of separated, individual rare earth oxides, excluding cerium.
SRC’s Rare Earth Processing Facility will follow the most stringent operating standards. To minimize the risk for the environment, the plant will be designed to have zero liquid discharge, which means that there will be no solution waste streams that are released into the environment. All solid waste will be handled and disposed of properly following regulations and procedures, as SRC and mining companies in Saskatchewan currently do.

REE EXPERTISE​

SRC has decades of experience in testing and developing concentration and separation technologies of REEs from various minerals, as well as operational experience. With mining clients in Canada and across the world, SRC has developed and piloted many REE concentration and separation processes.
This experience, combined with being located within Saskatchewan’s world-class mining jurisdiction that has a vibrant and sustainable uranium industry, are key assets to future success. The uranium industry also produces a REE-rich solution waste stream (containing mainly so called “heavy” REEs) that can be an additional feed source for the plant, as markets require.
SRC currently offers a large variety of REE services through existing service lines and facilities. These include:
  • Rare earth processing technology development and commercialization
  • Uranium tailings processing and treatment; recovery of thorium and uranium
  • Validation and demonstration of rare earth processing technologies in bench, pilot and semi-commercial scale
  • Rare earth production from bastnaesite, apatite and uranium processing waste
Once the facility is operational, SRC will be able to offer a number of other services to industry, including potential toll separation of individual rare earth elements and potential toll processing of monazite.
This will mean that mining companies around the world will have the option to sell their feedstock to a North American Rare Earth Processing Facility for the first time.
In the future, SRC plans to use this Facility as a starting point for the creation of an REE technology hub, which will likely include developing downstream and upstream aspects of the REE supply chain. Future development also includes new applications for lanthanum and cerium. In order to do this, SRC is currently developing capabilities for downstream rare earth product development and the production of magnets and alloys.
The future certainly looks bright for the rare earth elements industry in North America and this Facility and the proposed REE technology hub will play a key part in securing a supply chain right within Canada.
For more information, please visit www.src.sk.ca/ree.
 

Nick Danger

Council Member
Jul 21, 2013
1,512
283
83
Penticton, BC
Their focus appears to be on working in tandem with existing mining operations, operations with known high concentrations of the elements being sought, no mention of oilsands tailings. And with the oil industry under the environmental microscope the extraction technology would have to be squeaky green. If this facility is indeed built in Saskatchewan, is the financial return attractive enough to get cash-strapped oilsands operations involved ? I’m skeptical that an industry with a proven track record of “cut and run” would be looking at this with any seriousness.