Oregon recriminalises drug possession after overdoses rocket

bill barilko

Senate Member
Mar 4, 2009
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This is how BC is headed as well the whole 'de criminalisation' idea has been a bust.

I've actually refused to help someone who was overdosing on the sidewalk in front of my apartment building-let him croak and someone else hose down the mess I Just. Don't. Care.


Oregon has approved a state law that recriminalises drug possession.

The law rolls back an experimental policy - the most liberal drug measure in the US - that made possession for personal use a ticketed offence with a fine up to $100 (£76).

The new legislation penalises those possessing small amounts of drugs with probation, and up to 180 days in jail.

The governor said the state still aims to provide a path for drug treatment, rather than punishing drug users.

Tina Kotek, the Democratic governor, signed the bill on Monday. It goes into effect on 1 September.

Rehabilitation and destigmatisation was the intention of the original law, known as Measure 110, when it was passed in a 2020 voter measure, but a spike in the number of overdoses caused lawmakers and supporters to backtrack.

Measure 110 was seen by many as the most liberal effort in the US to decriminalise drugs like cocaine, heroine and methamphetamine.

State leaders admitted, however, that there were several implementation issues. Roadblocks to rehabilitation remained, and the upswing in fentanyl overdoses caused an uproar in the state.

In cities like Portland, sightings of people openly using drugs on streets, sidewalks and in front of stores increased and images appeared in national media.
Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler told the New York Times: "The truth is that addiction rates and overdose rates skyrocketed."

The mayor, who remained supportive of Measure 110, accused the state of failing to implement the law effectively. He said they decriminalised the use of drugs before putting the proper treatment services in place.

In addition to enhanced penalties for personal use possession, the new law still establishes ways for treatment to be offered as an alternative to criminal penalties.

Governor Kotek said the law's success will depend on coordination between multiple layers of government on the state and local level, as well as health care providers, all of whom she described as "necessary partners".

A few of those who originally supported Measure 110 voted for the new law during this year's legislative session, as there appeared to be signs of a new voter effort to overturn it. The state's more progressive Democrats opposed the change, however.

They remained concerned that increased criminal penalties would only lead to more arrests and fail to address the root cause of the state's drug problem.

"Research is consistently showing that (for) people who are incarcerated in jails and prisons, overdose has gone up substantially," Kassandra Frederique, the executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, told USA Today.

"And the fact that when people leave jails and prisons, the likelihood of overdose deaths also goes up substantially in comparison to the general population."
 
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TheShadow

Electoral Member
Apr 24, 2020
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Grand Bend
I used to work in a job where I was putting naloxone up people's nosed 2 to 3 times daily and usually the same people.

I left the job but after a while you just got numb to it and there was no consequence for them.
 
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Retired_Can_Soldier

The End of the Dog is Coming!
Mar 19, 2006
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Alberta
Addicts will take free drugs all day long. This might sound insensitive, but it's like feeding the animals. Once you start handing out the cheese doodles, they will come. The fact that people advocate giving people the poison that is killing them without any framework for treatment or recovery is like telling someone to leave their car keys by the door for the burglars. It's lazy, shortsighted, and destructive. It means they have given up and this is the policy. It's a codependent policy that is creating more drug addicts.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,303
11,389
113
Low Earth Orbit
It's a codependent policy that is creating more drug addicts.
The Industrial Homeless/Addicted Complex.

Try typing CUPE and addiction or homeless into a search engine.

There are 2 babysitters for every junkie. As an example if addiction and homelessness were cured in a day. In Vancouver alone 6000 people would be job hunting the next day.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
55,570
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Addicts will take free drugs all day long. This might sound insensitive, but it's like feeding the animals. Once you start handing out the cheese doodles, they will come. The fact that people advocate giving people the poison that is killing them without any framework for treatment or recovery is like telling someone to leave their car keys by the door for the burglars. It's lazy, shortsighted, and destructive. It means they have given up and this is the policy. It's a codependent policy that is creating more drug addicts.
I could accept making possession of drugs legal, and distribution thereof illegal. The former is personal freedom, however stupid and self-destructive: the latter is commerce and a proper subject for government regulation.