Ontario issues stay-at-home order except for essentials

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
26,461
613
113
Some passengers arriving at Pearson violating Quarantine Act
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
John Chidley-Hill
Publishing date:Feb 25, 2021 • 13 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubble75 Comments
The flight arrival lineup at Pearson International Airport located in Terminal One on February 22, 2021.
The flight arrival lineup at Pearson International Airport located in Terminal One on February 22, 2021. PHOTO BY JACK BOLAND /Toronto Sun
Article content
Several international travellers arriving at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport have refused to comply with a new rule requiring a three-day hotel quarantine, local police said Wednesday.

Peel Region police said that while most cases were resolved after conversations with officers, some people refused to follow the rules that took effect this week and were fined $880 under Ontario regulations.


Police said they will not detain anyone for breaking the hotel quarantine rule unless there are aggravating circumstances involved, such as a criminal offence.

They added that the Public Health Agency of Canada would be responsible for any further potential fines under the Quarantine Act, which states that anyone arriving in Canada must stay in an isolation hotel for three nights. Travellers may only leave after a negative COVID-19 test, but are expected to self-isolate for a total of 14 days.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
The Public Health Agency of Canada said Wednesday that it was “aware of the situation” and looking into it.

“Travellers are legally obligated to follow the instructions of a Screening Officer or Quarantine Officer through the 14-day period, whether in regards to testing, transit to locations, their mandatory hotel stopover or during quarantine at home or other suitable location,” it said.

“If they do not follow the instructions, there are penalties including a maximum fine of up to $750,000 or imprisonment for six months.”

Dr. Lawrence Loh, Peel Region’s medical officer of health, said Wednesday that the quarantine measures are in place to protect the public.

“It’s unfortunate (…) that this might be occurring,” said Loh. “Please remember that it’s a disease that spreads from person to person and it takes all of us to do our part.”


Patrick Brown, the mayor of Brampton, Ont., just north of the airport, said that people who choose to ignore the regulations are being selfish.

“By not being mindful that you can bring dangerous variants into the country, you’re being selfish to your neighbours, to your city,” said Brown. “I hope that people do abide by the new stricter guidelines.”

Meanwhile, RCMP in Vancouver, which has another international airport where travellers can land, said they had no reports of people not complying with the new rules.

Federal officials have said that staying in a government-approved isolation hotel could cost up to $2,000 for the three-night stay. Rates at some of those hotels, however, indicate that the stay could cost far less.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
The hotel stays, which must be paid for by the travellers, are among a series of measures that came into effect on Monday to limit the spread of COVID-19 and more contagious variants of the virus.

Most incoming air travellers will need to get tested for the virus upon arrival and again toward the end of their mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Travellers arriving at land borders will be given self-swab kits, and testing will be provided on-site at five high-volume border crossings.

The new rules are in addition to previous orders that require a negative test result within 72 hours of arrival. Travellers will need to complete a second test on Day 10 of their self-isolation period.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the tighter border controls are meant to keep everyone safe.

— with files from Denise Paglinawan
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
26,461
613
113
Fired travelling London, Ont. hospital boss seeking another $1M in damages
Author of the article:Jennifer Bieman
Publishing date:Feb 24, 2021 • 21 hours ago • 4 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Paul Woods (File photo)
Paul Woods (File photo)
Article content
London Health Sciences Centre’s former chief executive is seeking another $1 million in damages after he was ousted for travelling abroad during the pandemic, alleging the hospital engaged in “reprehensible” and “malicious” conduct.

In an amended statement of claim filed Friday in Ontario Superior Court, Paul Woods is seeking an additional $1 million in punitive damages for his termination from LHSC, bringing his total claim to $3.5 million.

NANNY TOUTED AS "HERO": Pushes two little boys to safety as she is struck by a car
Trackerdslogo
Woods’s previous statement of claim, filed just days after he was fired Jan. 11, was seeking $2.5 million in damages, including $1.4 million in compensation, $1 million damages for alleged harm to his reputation and $100,000 for unproven breaches to Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

The amended statement is seeking $1 million in punitive damages, money awarded to a plaintiff that is meant to punish a defendant or deter the defendant or others from similar actions in the future.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
In the amended claim, Woods alleges LHSC’s conduct was “reprehensible, malicious, oppressive, high-handed, and a marked departure from the ordinary standards of decent behaviour to merit condemnation.”

“Punitive damages in the amount of $1,000,000 are necessary, reasonable, appropriate, and rationally required to punish the defendant and to meet the objectives of retribution, deterrence, and denunciation,” the amended statement of claim says.

Statements of claim, and defences filed in response, contain allegations not yet tested in court.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Dr. Paul Woods, CEO of London Health Sciences Centre, is pictured during a 2018 interview. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)
SIMS: Dr. Paul Woods and the do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do doctrine
Dr. Paul Woods, CEO of London Health Sciences Centre, is pictured during a 2018 interview. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)
About-face on CEO raises questions about LHSC board: expert
Dr. Paul Woods, CEO of London Health Sciences Centre, is pictured during a 2018 interview. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)
Former hospital CEO lost 'moral authority' to stay in post: LHSC
Paul Woods (File photo)
Trip-taking London hospital boss files $2.5M lawsuit over firing
Dr. Paul Woods, CEO of London Health Sciences Centre, is pictured during a 2018 interview. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)
Furious health-care unions eye trip-taking London hospital boss's ouster
Dr. Paul Woods, CEO of London Health Sciences Centre, is pictured during a 2018 interview. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)
Hospital foundations unlikely to suffer from CEO travel scandal: Expert
Amy Walby
LHSC broke crisis communication 'tenet' in travel-scandal fallout: Expert
Dr. Paul Woods, chief executive of London Health Sciences Centre, spoke with The London Free Press editorial board in May 2018. Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press
London hospital board backs CEO despite several mid-pandemic U.S. trips
Dr. Paul Woods, chief executive of London Health Sciences Centre, spoke with The London Free Press editorial board in May 2018. Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press
Q+A: London's top hospital boss on an 'unbelievable' 2020, what's ahead

LHSC announced Jan. 8 that Woods had travelled to the U.S. to see immediate family five times between March 2020 and the week before Christmas.

The disclosure that Woods had travelled several times to the United States while the federal government was advising Canadians to avoid non-essential travel to limit the spread of COVID-19 was made nearly two months after he sent an email to hospital staff scolding employees for flouting public health rules on masking and physical distancing during breaks.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
The hospital’s board initially said it was keeping Woods in his role, but reversed its decision days later amid backlash from the public and LHSC unions.

In his statement of claim, Woods alleges his trips to the U.S. during the pandemic to see his immediate family were sanctioned by the board’s former chairperson Amy Walby, who resigned shortly after Woods filed his lawsuit.

The claim also slams the statement by LHSC’s board announcing Woods’s firing, contending it “created the impression that Dr. Woods was not forthright and candid with the board.”

In doing so, the statement of claim alleges LHSC damaged Woods’ reputation by putting him in the “same negative light” as some politicians who vacationed abroad despite public health advice discouraging it.

LHSC denies Woods’ allegations in its statement of defence. The hospital is not expecting to file an amended statement of defence in response to Woods’ updated claim, LHSC’s lawyer Brian Gover said Tuesday.

“It (the amended statement of claim) doesn’t change our analysis of the case,” Gover said.

In its statement of defence, LHSC claims senior hospital executives repeatedly raised concerns about Woods’s travel. It also claims Woods wrongfully said his travel was approved by the board chair when he was met with the objections.

The statement of defence contends the outrage from hospital staff and the public about Woods’s U.S. travel weeks after the email was a catalyst to his termination.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
Related
SIMS: Dr. Paul Woods and the do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do doctrine
About-face on CEO raises questions about LHSC board: expert
Former hospital CEO lost 'moral authority' to stay in post: LHSC
Trip-taking London hospital boss files $2.5M lawsuit over firing
Furious health-care unions eye trip-taking London hospital boss's ouster
Hospital foundations unlikely to suffer from CEO travel scandal: Expert
LHSC broke crisis communication 'tenet' in travel-scandal fallout: Expert
London hospital board backs CEO despite several mid-pandemic U.S. trips
Q+A: London's top hospital boss on an 'unbelievable' 2020, what's ahead
“Board members had received significant feedback from staff, physicians, donors and other stakeholders expressing outrage over Dr. Woods’s decision to travel,” the statement of defence said.

“It quickly became clear that Dr. Woods had lost the moral authority to lead the hospital and his employment was terminated.

“To the extent that Dr. Woods’ reputation has been harmed, it is a result of his own poor judgment and hypocrisy,” LHSC’s statement of defence alleges.

Woods’ lawyer, Michael Wright, asked LHSC to provide additional details about the allegations it made in its statement of defence, including the date and exact nature of the alleged concerns from the senior hospital executives.

The demand for particulars was denied by LHSC.

“Our position is that they had sufficient information to plead their case, as we’ve seen. They’ve amended their pleadings without further particulars from us,” Gover said.

“They can get further information through the discovery process, which is really what discoveries are for.”

jbieman@postmedia.com

CURIOUS LONDON
If you have any questions about London, just send them our way!

Our newsroom will search for the answers. Email: CuriousLondon@postmedia.com