Huawei's Meng Wanzhou expected to plead guilty today in U.S. court-Canada Rejoices

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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B.C.
What royally pisses me off and has since the Two Michaels were detained is that they were thrown into prisons while that meng creature lived in the lap of luxury. There isn't money enough to repay the terror, grief, pain and suffering they went through but this frickin' government better come up with a good chunk anyway.
But are you surprised ? Would you expect different ?
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,287
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Vancouver Island
Name a country without a significant population of Chinese (or those of recent Chinese Citizenship) Citizens. The Chinese Communist Party keeps their thumbs on their citizens (& former citizens) abroad through their relative still in China. That’s not a big secret.

China (Chinese still in China) are 1/5 of the global population….& that’s not counting citizens abroad or a single generation or two out of China, etc…how is that avoidable? It’s not the 800lb Panda in the room for nothing.
It has been suggested that China had some influence in the voting in ridings with large chinese populations in BC.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,624
909
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Kovrig and Spavor were clearly hostages—by now we can all stop pretending that this is just a claim various “experts” and “observers” make. They were released on Friday because their imprisonment was simply no longer of any use to Xi Jinping. “As the resolution for Ms. Meng was heading towards success,” Hillman explained, “the Chinese government made its decision. And its decision was that it was no longer in its interest to continue holding the Michaels, and so they started the process in talking to our officials in Beijing about making arrangements to have the Michaels leave.”


China’s foreign-language propaganda organs were silent about the Michaels’ release until finally settling on this invention: the reason they were allowed to return to Canada was that they were unwell, and it was a humanitarian gesture, completely unrelated to Meng’s return. And in any case they had confessed to being spies, so that’s all that needs to be said about that.

But now that the Trudeau government can no longer rely on the Michaels’ captivity to explain away its paralysis in long-overdue decisions related to China’s human rights abuses, Xi Jinping’s disruptions to international norms and standards and Beijing’s deep influences in this country, what will Canada’s policy look like? What lessons have we learned?

Will we even get around to officially placing Huawei outside the core of Canada’s 5G internet connectivity, following the lead of Canada’s democratic allies? Are we going to stick with Trudeau’s long-term strategy of deeper and more intimate cultural, economic and political ties with China?

Maybe “Hopefully” Trudeau might have an announcement “In a couple of weeks…”

It’s early innings, but the plan seems to be just getting things back on track, back to “normal.” Canada’s policy will be grounded in several “c” words, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau explained on Sunday: Co-exist, compete, co-operate and challenge. Sounds complicated, and the word “capitulate” was absent, but this is the sort of language the Xi regime and the Trudeau government have been using to define the kind of relationship they want for some long while now. What will change? What lesson have we learned?

Canada’s “eyes are wide open” now, Garneau said. If the expression had a familiar ring to it, there’s a reason for that. Here’s former ambassador John McCallum, on Sept. 22, 2017, more than a year before Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were abducted and imprisoned: “We want to pursue stronger ties with China, but with our eyes wide open.”http://apple.news/AZXX8riVXQMeViXY5cwoLFw
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,287
2,816
113
Vancouver Island
Kovrig and Spavor were clearly hostages—by now we can all stop pretending that this is just a claim various “experts” and “observers” make. They were released on Friday because their imprisonment was simply no longer of any use to Xi Jinping. “As the resolution for Ms. Meng was heading towards success,” Hillman explained, “the Chinese government made its decision. And its decision was that it was no longer in its interest to continue holding the Michaels, and so they started the process in talking to our officials in Beijing about making arrangements to have the Michaels leave.”


China’s foreign-language propaganda organs were silent about the Michaels’ release until finally settling on this invention: the reason they were allowed to return to Canada was that they were unwell, and it was a humanitarian gesture, completely unrelated to Meng’s return. And in any case they had confessed to being spies, so that’s all that needs to be said about that.

But now that the Trudeau government can no longer rely on the Michaels’ captivity to explain away its paralysis in long-overdue decisions related to China’s human rights abuses, Xi Jinping’s disruptions to international norms and standards and Beijing’s deep influences in this country, what will Canada’s policy look like? What lessons have we learned?

Will we even get around to officially placing Huawei outside the core of Canada’s 5G internet connectivity, following the lead of Canada’s democratic allies? Are we going to stick with Trudeau’s long-term strategy of deeper and more intimate cultural, economic and political ties with China?

Maybe “Hopefully” Trudeau might have an announcement “In a couple of weeks…”

It’s early innings, but the plan seems to be just getting things back on track, back to “normal.” Canada’s policy will be grounded in several “c” words, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau explained on Sunday: Co-exist, compete, co-operate and challenge. Sounds complicated, and the word “capitulate” was absent, but this is the sort of language the Xi regime and the Trudeau government have been using to define the kind of relationship they want for some long while now. What will change? What lesson have we learned?

Canada’s “eyes are wide open” now, Garneau said. If the expression had a familiar ring to it, there’s a reason for that. Here’s former ambassador John McCallum, on Sept. 22, 2017, more than a year before Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were abducted and imprisoned: “We want to pursue stronger ties with China, but with our eyes wide open.”http://apple.news/AZXX8riVXQMeViXY5cwoLFw
There is only one C word that should be used in connection with dealing with China. CANCELLED.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,624
909
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The Trudeau government has remained silent in response to a House of Commons motion last year demanding a thorough and hard-headed response to Beijing’s elaborate influence-peddling, harassment and intimidation operations in Canada — operations that now appear to have included malicious disinformation and interference in the just-concluded federal election.


As recently as last week, Garneau said Canada wasn’t going to take sides in Beijing’s bid to sabotage Taiwan’s efforts to join the awkwardly named Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, even though the 11-country trade pact is intended as a bulwark against Beijing’s growing habit of throwing its economic weight around the Pacific Rim. There’s also no word on whether Trudeau will withdraw from his $1 billion pledge to invest in the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank, which was initially set up to finance Beijing’s Belt and Road bullying and loansharking.

But for Canada’s allies, especially the United States, the litmus test of Canada’s reliability will be a decision on whether to permit Xi’s “national champion” telecommunications giant Huawei Technologies to play a part in Canada’s 5G internet connectivity rollout. Earlier this week, Trudeau said Canada’s unaccountably long-stalled decision on Huawei will be announced “sometime over the next few weeks.”

In the U.S., both Democrats and Republicans are adamant that if Ottawa lets Huawei in, then Canada can say goodbye to its standing in the Five Eyes intelligence partnership binding Canada, the U.S., the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

When Canada and the United States surrendered to China’s recent hostage diplomacy, celebrations in Beijing over the return of Huawei’s CFO Meng Wanzhou showed they saw at something of a, in Chairman Mao’s words, “Great Leap Forward.”

It was a vindication of Chinese strength and imperialism over international law and diplomacy that is firmly rooted in racist concepts that have governed the ambitions of Beijing’s ruling class ever since the classification became common.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,624
909
113
Regina, Saskatchewan

So now what? An announcement might come in a few weeks after we’ve gotten through the last Federal Election & Justin’s latest vacation?:


OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spent the first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation on vacation in Tofino, B.C., instead of participating in any events to mark the occasion.

The trip to Tofino also deviated from the prime minister’s daily itinerary, which said he was in Ottawa for private meetings. Trudeau started his day in Ottawa, but according to flight tracking websites his plane left the nation’s capital shortly after 8 a.m.
 
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