Guilbeault says internet censorship law looming

B00Mer

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Guilbeault says internet censorship law looming


Guilbeault.jpg


So web forums such as Canadian Content that say hateful things against Trudeau or politicians in Canada can be shut down and the owners fined.
So www.StevenGuilbeaultSucks.com points to this thread.
;)
 
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B00Mer

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No your job is to protect our heritage. Part of that is protecting our constitutional rights not stomping all over them.

You have NO RIGHT TO LIMIT MY FREE SPEECH. My constitutional heritage guarantees that!

Oh yeah, and where the fk is A'Toole on this. Said during the leadership race that he would defend free speech and I haven't heard a word from him about this dangerous bill. Just another frigging lie out of his mouth.



hon.steven.guilbeault@canada.ca
 
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B00Mer

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Liberal MP Leaks CRTC to Regulate Apps, Too


Why this assault on our digital freedoms is going so horribly unreported baffles me. The Liberals literally want to give the CRTC power to regulate, and therefore censor, the internet. They want to let them control what you can post on Facebook, Youtube, and given how this will apply even reddit. This alone should make them unelectable, but yet I've had Liberal cheerleaders on this sub tell me that net neutrality is an "outdated concept."

If these proposals came from the Conservatives people would be absolutely up in arms about this, with nonstop reporting in the news cycle about how the Conservatives are trying to censor the internet, but when the Liberals are doing it? Not a peep in the mainstream, so we have to rely on small, dedicated sources like this that focus on one thing. I remember when the Conservatives proposed to give police warrantless access to certain internet metadata and people exploded about it. Guess that $600 million buys you a lot more than we thought.
 

taxslave

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Liberal MP Leaks CRTC to Regulate Apps, Too


Why this assault on our digital freedoms is going so horribly unreported baffles me. The Liberals literally want to give the CRTC power to regulate, and therefore censor, the internet. They want to let them control what you can post on Facebook, Youtube, and given how this will apply even reddit. This alone should make them unelectable, but yet I've had Liberal cheerleaders on this sub tell me that net neutrality is an "outdated concept."

If these proposals came from the Conservatives people would be absolutely up in arms about this, with nonstop reporting in the news cycle about how the Conservatives are trying to censor the internet, but when the Liberals are doing it? Not a peep in the mainstream, so we have to rely on small, dedicated sources like this that focus on one thing. I remember when the Conservatives proposed to give police warrantless access to certain internet metadata and people exploded about it. Guess that $600 million buys you a lot more than we thought.
This will all stop when we reach flossy's slavish devotion to the word of turdOWE.
 

spaminator

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LILLEY: Trudeau's internet censorship bill must be stopped
Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Apr 28, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 3 minute read • 129 Comments
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau puts on a mask at a news conference in Ottawa
Article content
If the idea of the government controlling what you can read online, what you can post online, and what videos you can view doesn’t strike you as quite right, then you might be a Canadian.

Sadly, it’s the government of Canada that’s now putting forward legislation to give itself the type of powers we normally associate with basic dictatorships, like China.


Bill C-10, currently before the House of Commons, would give the government the power to regulate any content you generate and post online. Your video ranting on Twitter, dancing on TikTok, or pontificating on Facebook would be treated as a radio or television broadcaster.

Previously, the legislation had an exemption for user-generated content, but that was stripped out at the behest of the Liberals last week.

“This is a remarkable and dangerous step in an already bad piece of legislation,” writes Michael Geist.

Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa and the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law. This means he not only knows what he’s talking about on this issue, but the federal government agrees, funding his work and research.

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His assessment of the bill is brutal but accurate.

“The government believes that it should regulate all user-generated content, leaving it to the regulator to determine on what terms and conditions will be attached the videos of millions of Canadians on sites like Youtube, Instagram, TikTok, and hundreds of other services,” said Geist.

He called the Trudeau Liberals the most “anti-internet government in Canadian history,” a group hellbent on erecting what he calls the “great Canadian internet firewall.” The government wants to be able to block websites it determines Canadians should not see, remove content posted in Canada without any independent review, and to regulate your video postings using the CRTC.

I remember sitting at a luncheon in Ottawa years ago on World Press Freedom Day and listening to CBC’s Beijing Bureau Chief Patrick Brown tell the audience what it was like in China with internet censorship. He told the story of a young woman killed by a local communist party official who was driving recklessly.

As the locals started to share stories online about what happened, the government stepped in to censor those stories. People began to post in ways that didn’t include the party official’s name so the censorship continued until searching for “BMW,” the make of the car the official was driving, was blocked.


This bill won’t put Canada in the same position as China, but it does put us on the same path and gives the government all the tools they need for total internet control.

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“As much as we want to think that it wouldn’t be the cat video that our grandma would post or maybe a friend would post, it is in fact those things that could be regulated should the CRTC wish to intrude,” Conservative MP Rachael Harder told me Wednesday. Her party will oppose the bill, but the NDP has said it is open to supporting it.

If that happens, Harder predicts a constitutional challenge.

“Section 2B protects us and our ability to speak freely,” Harder said.

Section 2B of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms states that everyone has “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication.”

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on May 20, 2020.
LILLEY: Liberals call for censoring the Internet again
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill Tuesday May 26, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
LILLEY UNLEASHED: Trudeau wants to censor the internet, again.
A YouTube logo is seen at the YouTube Space LA in Playa Del Rey, California October 21, 2015.
EDITORIAL: Say no to Trudeau's online censorship plans

That’s the Charter that Justin Trudeau’s father brought into force in 1982. It seems that before the Charter hit its 40th anniversary, Justin is looking to shred Pierre’s legacy.

It’s time for the government to stop and walk away from this dangerous legislation.
 
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spaminator

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LILLEY: Liberals' internet censorship bill a troubling power grab
Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Apr 29, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • 107 Comments
It’s been described as a “full-blown assault” on free expression in Canada by a former commissioner with the CRTC. Frankly, I think that’s putting it mildly. Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation.
It’s been described as a “full-blown assault” on free expression in Canada by a former commissioner with the CRTC. Frankly, I think that’s putting it mildly. Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation. PHOTO BY ISTOCK /GETTY IMAGES
Article content
It’s been described as a “full-blown assault” on free expression in Canada by a former commissioner with the CRTC. Frankly, I think that’s putting it mildly. Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation.

Above and beyond that, the legislation specifically says that decisions on how to implement the bill will be left up to the unelected, government-appointed Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or CRTC, as it is commonly called.


The idea of government appointees deciding what is appropriate content online should worry every Canadian.

While the stated purpose of Bill C-10 is supposedly to boost Canadian content and crack down on hate speech and illegal content such as child pornography, the actual powers it grants to the government and its appointees are far-reaching. The Canadian content regulations that currently apply to radio and television may soon apply to the videos you watch on YouTube, Facebook or TikTok.

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Sure, I watch and even generate plenty of Canadian content on these platforms, but do we want the government deciding that you’ve seen enough American, British or French videos and need to watch a homegrown one before proceeding? Do we want the CRTC to decide what creators like myself must produce?

Let me give you the example of 25-year-old Maddie Lymburner. The Hamilton, Ont. native makes workout videos that she posts online. Turns out they are rather popular and she has accumulated almost six million subscribers and more than 500 million video views.

Under these new rules, Maddie will be considered a program and subject to any CRTC regulation as the organization sees fit. She, or the platforms that host her, could be forced to air free political ads come election time — that’s actually in the act.

This legislation makes changes to the broadcasting act, the copyright act, the accessibility act and even the cannabis act all in the name of regulating the internet.


It’s not just successful folks such as Maddie who need to be worried. Any video or audio you post online, any blog you post that is more than just text, will be subject to government regulation and even censorship.

Law professor Michael Geist, a recognized expert in Canadian internet law and e-commerce, thinks the government’s legislation is out of step with where average Canadians are.

Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation. GETTY IMAGES FILE
Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation. GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTO BY LARS HAGBERG /AFP via Getty Images
“Canadians don’t want bureaucrats at the CRTC deciding what the Netflix or YouTube algorithms are, let alone deciding if the Instagram content I see is Canadian enough,” Geist told me Thursday.

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“I think this minister is badly out of touch with millions of Canadians who use these platforms to express themselves.”

Sadly, it doesn’t look like the government is close to backing down.

“In November the prime minister said he would always defend freedom of expression but now he’s trying to regulate political speech that he doesn’t like. Why is the government attacking Canada’s free speech rights yet again?” Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole asked in the House of Commons.

Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault answered O’Toole by saying many Canadians support his bill, later he said that only the extreme elements of the Conservative Party, including those opposed to abortion, are against this bill.

You know the Liberals are on the ropes when they reach for the abortion issue.

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LILLEY: Trudeau's internet censorship bill must be stopped
Flag of Canada is in texture. Template. Coronavirus pandemic. Countries are closed. Locks.
INTERNET FIREWALL IN CANADA? Rachael Harder: PM's content censorship bill must be stopped
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill Tuesday May 26, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
LILLEY UNLEASHED: Trudeau wants to censor the internet, again.

This bill is being denounced by Canadians left, right and centre who are concerned with the idea of government regulating everything we say online — or at least giving themselves the power to do so. Whatever the intention of Bill C-10, it goes too far and needs to be rejected.

That’s not an extremist position, that’s one rooted in Canadian traditions, like the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
 
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taxslave

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There are several petitions around to stop this nonsense. Find one and sign it. Open media has one and I think CTF also has one.
 

spaminator

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LILLEY: Trudeau's internet bill would take Canadians off the web
Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Apr 30, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • 23 Comments
Justin Trudeau's Bill C-10 will restrict internet content in Canada.
Justin Trudeau's Bill C-10 will restrict internet content in Canada.
Article content
The backlash against Bill C-10 is being driven by the prospect of the government having the power to regulate cat videos and any other user generated content posted to Facebook or TikTok — but the problems with this bill run much deeper.

Fundamentally, this bill will change your entire online experience.


Users of music streaming services such as Spotify, the audio book service Audible, or even casual viewers of YouTube could see major changes to their experience. Despite paying for these services, requirements could easily be imposed by government appointees to force Canadian content requirements on these services.

Imagine finishing an audio book and not being allowed to listen to another one until you’ve selected an appropriate, government-approved book to listen to. Imagine having Canadian songs inserted into the playlist of a service you pay for because the government says you must listen to and support this music.

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It’s right in the legislation where the stated goal of the bill is laid out, “add online undertakings — undertakings for the transmission or retransmission of programs over the Internet — as a distinct class of broadcasting undertakings.” Doing this would put any online audio or video service under the auspices of the CRTC, which is given power by this act to determine “the proportion of programs to be broadcast that shall be Canadian programs.”

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None
LILLEY: Trudeau's internet censorship bill must be stopped
It’s been described as a “full-blown assault” on free expression in Canada by a former commissioner with the CRTC. Frankly, I think that’s putting it mildly. Bill C-10, the legislation put forward by the Trudeau Liberals to police the internet, puts most relevant online content under government supervision and regulation.
LILLEY: Liberals' internet censorship bill a troubling power grab

So suddenly, what you can watch on YouTube is restricted in order to ensure there is enough Canadian content posted for Canadian users of the site.

In many ways, what the Trudeau Liberals are trying to do is take the internet experience that we now have and replace it with one more akin to AOL in the mid-90s. For people who don’t remember AOL, it was an online service but it wasn’t the world wide web — it was whatever AOL decided was appropriate for you to experience within their walled garden.

Now the government wants to decide what is appropriate.

Enjoy listening to popular podcasts such as Joe Rogan or Adam Carolla? You likely won’t be able to access them inside Canada in the future if this bill passes because podcasts will be subject to CRTC regulations and so will the services that provide them. Apple Podcasts or Stitcher will simply limit what content is available in order to make sure they don’t violate government rules.

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In the future we will also likely see new products bypass Canada rather than try to comply with these regulations. When the next hot app like Clubhouse comes along, instead of Canadians being able to participate, we will be left out.

Existing products currently offered to Canadians by some of the web giants that the government appears to be at war with may disappear if the cost of complying with the regulations outweighs the benefits of being in the small market that is Canada.

I’m sure the government will offer grant money for Canadian tech wizards to develop Canadian versions of popular apps but that just bring us back to that walled garden approach. We won’t have the world wide web in Canada anymore, we will have what Justin Trudeau decides we can have access to.

There are a lot of people upset at the idea of the government regulating user generated content, effectively curating their social media feeds, and that is a good thing. But the truth is, the entire premise of this bill should be rejected by anyone who wants a free and open internet in Canada.

blilley@postmedia.com
 
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B00Mer

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Steven Guilbeault cant even explains why he removed the exclusion for user-generated content. When he was advocating and saying how important it was at the start.


Edit:

If anyone wants to defend this bill you should know that this bill has been pushed by Rogers and Bell for years now. Rogers actually released a statement about how happy they are about the bill.

This bill is not about promoting Canadian content. If this was a conservative bill people would be talking about how they are using nationalism to trick gullible conservatives into supporting the bill.
 

B00Mer

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B00Mer

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Pull your head out of your cellphones, and take off the blinders.. if these idiots pass this law.. it will change Canada forever.

Even Free Speech web forums like Canadian Content may have issues.


image-MEozSKgUXUFQmcuy.jpg
 

spaminator

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KINSELLA: Everybody's missing the mark on Bill C-10
Internet censorship bill is political suicide, but nobody seems to care

Author of the article:Warren Kinsella
Publishing date:May 05, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 3 minute read • 40 Comments
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attends a news conference in Ottawa on April 9, 2021.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attends a news conference in Ottawa on April 9, 2021. PHOTO BY BLAIR GABLE /REUTERS
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It’s not censorship.

It’s not censorship to want to use the law to prohibit, and punish, those who make and distribute child pornography.

LILLEY UNLEASHED: Which COVID vaccine is best for you?
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It’s not censorship to object to hate propaganda, or to sanction those who promote genocide against those they hate.

It’s not censorship to believe that we shouldn’t make it easy for lunatics to access detailed instructions online about how to make bombs or chemical weapons.

It’s not censorship, it’s showing good judgment. In a civil society, it’s the obligation we owe each other.

It keeps us safe, among other things.

But Justin Trudeau’s Bill C-10 isn’t about censoring things that we all agree are harmful, it’s about censoring you, and what you say online — in a tweet, a Facebook post, on a blog.

It’s about limiting your ability to express yourself in a democracy.

It’s a constitutional abomination. It needs to be stopped.


So why haven’t the Opposition parties stopped it?

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The Opposition, as on most days during the pandemic, are completely irrelevant.

They didn’t see the political opportunity presented by C-10 until a few days ago.

The Bloc Quebecois are all for the Bill, naturally. No surprise there.

They come from a province that has a long history of controlling political speech. It’s in their DNA.

The NDP, meanwhile, is for it too.


The New Democrats like to persuade themselves that C-10 will control “hate speech,” but that’s just a lie they tell themselves to justify their ongoing role as Trudeau’s Parliamentary eunuchs.

They’re irrelevant, numerically and philosophically.

The Conservatives, naturally, never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity.

They didn’t see the outrage that is C-10 until their grassroots demanded that they wake up.

That’s the Opposition. They don’t matter, much. Not yet.

But what about the government? That’s what this writer doesn’t get.

Now, as readers of this newspaper know, Justin Trudeau is a deeply dishonest man.

He is the most inauthentic politician in generations, and that’s saying something.

But.

But he knows he lacks his father’s intellectual depth — or Stephen Harper or Jean Chretien’s strategic skill.

What he does possess, in abundance however, is a finely-honed sense of self-preservation.

He’d kill his dog to win.

(Anyone seen the dog, recently, BTW?)

So why would he do something like C-10 on the eve of an election — likely if not in June then in October? Why would he do that? Why would he risk losing over this?

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Because he could.

It’s not a piece of legislation. It’s a political suicide note. It’s self-immolating madness.

That’s what some of us just don’t get.

You could run an entire national election campaign on C-10 because the Internet is the only thing that connects pandemic-bound people to the world right now.

The Internet and its bastard children Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok are the only way many of us can connect with each other during this pandemic without end.

And Trudeau wants to be seen as censoring that? Has he lost his mind?

Now, never discount the possibility that powerful people make powerfully stupid choices, I always say.

But this? This is historically stupid. It is epically stupid.

It is stupid on steroids.

The Conservatives, who have been on a downward trajectory in the Erin O’Toole era, have been handed a way to actually win the election.

Personally, I doubt they’re intelligent enough to recognize it. And the Liberal Party, as it turns out, isn’t intelligent enough to figure that out, either.

But – improbably and unexpectedly, things just got interesting.

Because this is really, truly censorship.

— Warren Kinsella is a lawyer and adjunct professor at the University of Calgary Faculty of Law
 
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