deaths

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
Retired Ohio sheriff and K-9 partner die hours apart
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 20, 2021 • 6 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Retired Geauga County Sheriff Dan McClelland, centre, is pictured with K-9 Midge in this photo posted on the Twitter account of Geauga County Sheriff's Office.
Retired Geauga County Sheriff Dan McClelland, centre, is pictured with K-9 Midge in this photo posted on the Twitter account of Geauga County Sheriff's Office. PHOTO BY GEAUGA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE /Twitter
Article content
A retired Ohio sheriff and his police dog were partners on the job and partners until the very end.

Retired Geauga County Sheriff Dan McClelland, 67, and his 16-year-old drug-sniffing companion, Midge, died on the same day, the Associated Press reported.


McClelland died in hospital after a battle with cancer last Wednesday, while his dog died hours later at home.

A 44-year veteran on the job, McClelland had Midge as his partner for 10 years before both retired in 2016.

Midge, a Chihuahua-rat terrier mix, was certified by Guinness World Records in 2006 as the world’s smallest police dog.

According to AP, the two were inseparable and well-liked, but it was Midge who attracted a local fan following.

“He used to joke that people would see him in a parade in a car and would say, ‘Hey, there’s Midge and whatshisname,'” recalled McClelland’s successor, Sheriff Scott Hildenbrand. “I think she was more popular than him.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

Though small in size, Midge was more nimble than the typical large police dog and was able to search cars without ruining property or creating a mess.

McClelland’s family told AP that the two will be buried together.
1618957171727.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
Argentine transport minister dies in traffic accident
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Apr 24, 2021 • 8 hours ago • < 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Rescue personnel work at the scene of a traffic accident where Argentina's Transport Minister Mario Meoni died, in San Andres de Giles, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, April 23, 2021, in this still image from video obtained via social media.
Rescue personnel work at the scene of a traffic accident where Argentina's Transport Minister Mario Meoni died, in San Andres de Giles, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, April 23, 2021, in this still image from video obtained via social media. PHOTO BY FM VALL VIA REUTERS /FM VALL via REUTERS
Article content
Argentine Transport Minister Mario Meoni died late on Friday in a traffic accident about 110 kilometers (70 miles) west of Buenos Aires, the government said in a statement.

The accident occurred when Meoni was driving alone during a storm to Junin, his home city. Local radio station FM VALL posted footage of firefighters attending to the overturned vehicle.


“With his death, Argentina loses a thorough, tireless and honest politician and an exemplary official,” President Alberto Fernández said in a statement.

Meoni, 56, was married with two children. He had been transport minister since December 2019, when Fernandez assumed the presidency.

In this photo taken on Dec. 10, 2019, Argentina’s President Alberto Fernandez (left) gestures next to Argentine Transport Minister Mario Meoni during a swearing in ceremony at Casa Rosada.
In this photo taken on Dec. 10, 2019, Argentina’s President Alberto Fernandez (left) gestures next to Argentine Transport Minister Mario Meoni during a swearing in ceremony at Casa Rosada. PHOTO BY JUAN MABROMATA /AFP via Getty Images
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
American astronaut Michael Collins of Apollo 11 fame dies at 90
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Rosalba O'Brien
Publishing date:Apr 28, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins speaks at a panel discussion on the 50th anniversary of the launch, in Cocoa Beach, Florida, U.S., July 16, 2019.
Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins speaks at a panel discussion on the 50th anniversary of the launch, in Cocoa Beach, Florida, U.S., July 16, 2019. PHOTO BY JOE SKIPPER /REUTERS
Article content
American astronaut Michael Collins, who stayed behind in the command module of Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969, while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin traveled to the lunar surface to become the first humans to walk on the moon, died on Wednesday at age 90, his family said.

A statement released by his family said Collins died of cancer.


Often described as the “forgotten” third astronaut on the historic mission, Collins remained alone for more than 21 hours until his two colleagues returned in the lunar module. He lost contact with mission control in Houston each time the spacecraft circled the dark side of the moon.

“Not since Adam has any human known such solitude as Mike Collins,” the mission log said, referring to the biblical figure.

Collins wrote an account of his experiences in his 1974 autobiography, “Carrying the Fire,” but largely shunned publicity.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins’ official portrait is seen in this July 1969 handout photo courtesy of NASA.
Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins’ official portrait is seen in this July 1969 handout photo courtesy of NASA. PHOTO BY NASA /REUTERS
“I know that I would be a liar or a fool if I said that I have the best of the three Apollo 11 seats, but I can say with truth and equanimity that I am perfectly satisfied with the one I have,” Collins said in comments released by NASA in 2009.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
Collins was born in Rome on Oct. 31, 1930 – the same year as both Armstrong and Aldrin. He was the son of a U.S. Army major general and, like his father, attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, graduating in 1952.

Like many of the first generation of American astronauts, Collins started out as an Air Force test pilot.

In 1963, he was chosen by NASA for its astronaut program, still in its early days but ramping up quickly at the height of the Cold War as the United States sought to push ahead of the Soviet Union and fulfill President John F. Kennedy’s pledge of landing a man on the moon by the end of the decade.

Collins’ first voyage into space came in July 1966 as pilot on Gemini X, part of the missions that prepared NASA’s Apollo program. The Gemini X mission carried out a successful docking with a separate target vehicle.


His second, and final, spaceflight was the historic Apollo 11.

He avoided much of the media fanfare that greeted the astronauts on their return to Earth, and was later often critical of the cult of celebrity.

After a short stint in government, Collins became director of the National Air and Space Museum, stepping down in 1978. He was also the author of a number of space-related books.

His strongest memory from Apollo 11, he said, was looking back at the Earth, which he said seemed “fragile.”

“I really believe that if the political leaders of the world could see their planet from a distance of 100,000 miles, their outlook could be fundamentally changed. That all-important border would be invisible, that noisy argument silenced,” he said.

His family’s statement said they know “how lucky Mike felt to live the life he did.”

“Please join us in fondly and joyfully remembering his sharp wit, his quiet sense of purpose, and his wise perspective, gained both from looking back at Earth from the vantage of space and gazing across calm waters from the deck of his fishing boat.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
WARMINGTON: Little Italy's legendary diplomat leaves behind more than a restaurant
Cafe Diplomatico founder Rocco Mastrangelo Sr. dies at 87

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Publishing date:Apr 29, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Rocco Mastrangelo Sr.
Rocco Mastrangelo Sr. PHOTO BY HANDOUT /Jerrett Funeral Homes
Article content
It’s ironic his legendary restaurant is called Cafe Diplomatico because Rocco Mastrangelo Sr. was one of Little Italy’s most famous diplomats.

“It takes a very special family to create a Toronto institution like the Dip,” said Mayor John Tory. “I have enjoyed many a day with fabulous custom-cooked pizza, pasta and wine at the Dip, but what you noticed the most was the family feel. The welcome. The good cheer.”

Seth Rogen releases funny PSA with a serious message about portion control for weed…
Trackerdslogo
Rocco, who died April 26 in his 88th year, truly was a diplomat.


“Rocco Mastrangelo Sr. worked hard to create that feel and create a special experience for generations of Torontonians including me. He was one of the pioneers in creating today’s incredible College Street experience,” said Tory.

“People who create these special places in Toronto are real city builders and Rocco’s tender loving care and hard work will live on for generations to come as thousands have a good time and good food. My condolences to his family on the sad end to a life very well lived.”

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
It’s a life that needs to be celebrated. The mayor is right. This man was the epitome of what Toronto and Canada are all about.

Kind, generous and loyal. He loved Little Italy and would never leave.

“He was a first class gentleman and always was,” said fellow restaurant icon George Bigliardi, who knew Rocco for more than 60 years. “He started and ran a great restaurant that is loved but he was a lot more than that. He cared about people.”

Bigliardi, who came to Canada in 1957, said Rocco was a role model people looked up to.

“When you first came here from Italy or from anywhere, Rocco would help you adjust,” said Bigliardi.

In those days, the corner of College and Clinton Sts. was not just a place to get a taste of back home, said George, but a place to start planning your future in Canada.

“He was like Johnny Lombardi in that way, outstanding individuals,” said Bigliardi. “Rocco would help people get clothes and a place to live and make sure they were fed.”


Born in Anzano Di Puglia, Italy, on Aug. 19, 1933, Rocco will be “lovingly remembered by his wife, Virginia, of 62 years, and his three children Licia (Dennis), Marco (Candice) and Rocco Jr. (Connie). He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Virginia, Michael, Alexandra, Julia, Cristian and Gianluca,” reads his obituary.

Many Torontonians who frequent the popular restaurant know all of them as well since this is not only a restaurant for families to come to but one where a family runs it and always have.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“When you told friends you’d be meeting them at ‘The Dip,’ you knew you were in for a great time,” says Sun national food editor Rita DeMontis. “Even the name of the cafe was iconic, a landmark institution beloved by the locals and strangers from around the world equally.

“Sitting on the patio on late summer nights, the warm air rich with the aroma of espresso, pizza and passion, are memories many carry to this day.”

The cause of death has not been discussed but his family says “due to the current COVID -19 restrictions, the visitation and services will remain private. A livestream of the funeral mass and cemetery committal service (with Jerrett Funeral Homes – St. Clair Chapel) will take place on Friday at 10:30a.m.” All donations in lieu of flowers can go to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“Rocco was dedicated to promoting Italian cinema and music. Throughout his life, Rocco shared his love and passion of Italian culture and thereby enriched multiculturalism in Canada,” says his obit. “His family will always remember his immensely generous heart — always willing to help anyone in need — and his stern but steadfast love for them.”

Cafe Diplomatico Restaurant and Pizzeria is still going strong and Little Italy has grown into being one Toronto’s greatest neighbourhoods.

As the mayor, Bigliardi and Rita said so well, Rocco may be gone but what he built will be here forever.

Thanks, Rocco. Rest in peace!

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
Obama family dog Bo, a 'constant, gentle presence', dies
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 09, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
U.S. President Barack Obama runs with his new pet dog Bo, a six-month old male Portuguese water dog, on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, April 14, 2009.
U.S. President Barack Obama runs with his new pet dog Bo, a six-month old male Portuguese water dog, on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, April 14, 2009. PHOTO BY JIM YOUNG /REUTERS
Article content
Former U.S. President Barack Obama’s family dog Bo, a male Portuguese Water Dog with a mop of black and white fur who became a familiar playful sight around the White House, has died.

Obama announced the death late on Saturday, saying the dog had been “a constant, gentle presence in our lives – happy to see us on our good days, our bad days and everyday in between.”


Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

“We will miss him dearly,” he said on Twitter.

His wife Michelle Obama said in a separate tweet that Bo, 12, had been suffering from cancer.

Bo came to the White House in 2009 soon after the start of Obama’s first term and was joined a few years later by a female of the same breed called Sunny.


Obama, who left office in 2017, praised Bo’s calm demeanor in the White House, saying the dog “had a big bark but no bite, loved to jump in the pool in summer, was unflappable with children, lived for scraps around the dinner table, and had great hair.”
1620629561579.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
27,932
876
113
BRAUN: Toronto mourns Const. Jason Drews
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Publishing date:May 12, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Toronto Police Const. Jason Drews
Toronto Police Const. Jason Drews PHOTO BY SUPPLIED PHOTO /Toronto Sun
Article content
Toronto Police are mourning the loss of Const. Jason Drews.

Drews, 49, died of cancer on Monday.


The loss of the 52 division “brother in blue” has prompted an outpouring of condolences on social media.

Just days ago, before his death, Drews got a special tribute from members of the Toronto Police Service — a drive-by parade outside the Margaret Bahen Hospice on Queen St. in Newmarket.

Drews was wheeled outside to watch the parade with his wife, Jaimie Lao, and their seven-year-old son, Max. It was a surprise for Drews, and Lao told a local paper how pleased and touched her husband was by the gesture.

She also expressed her gratitude that her ailing husband got to see how much love his fellow officers had for him.

Drews had prostate cancer that quickly spread to his spine and brain.

His death, said a colleague, is a tragedy for all.

Victor Ramesar, a retired primary response sergeant with Toronto Police Service, was Drews’ supervisor in the past. He described the late officer as a tremendous credit to the force.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“This is not just a tragic loss to his son and wife, but the City of Toronto, too. He was an outstanding officer. Jason was a kind and compassionate man,” Ramesar said.

“If I had a platoon like him, I could fix this city.”

Ramesar said Drews was always smiling, and always treated others — fellow officers and citizens alike — like gold.


“His seven-year-old son needs to know that his dad was a hero. Jason dedicated his life to serving the public. I hope his son will be proud of what his father accomplished in his lifetime,” Ramesar said.

Drews was a priority response officer, which means he saw the heavy-duty incidents.

“Homicides, shootings, sudden deaths, suicide — we see and touch and smell all the things people spend a lifetime trying to avoid,” Ramesar said.

Cops get used to that chaos, said Ramesar.

“Police work is a bit like the priesthood. It’s not a job — it’s a calling,” he said.

Toronto could use some more cops like Drews, said Ramesar.

“Guys like Jason, people don’t really appreciate how much they do. We need more like him. He was professional, courageous, compassionate. He always gave them his best.

“He was an outstanding officer, and he was a hero in life.”

Several colleagues spoke of their admiration for Drews, including retired detective Peter Harmsen, who said he feels fortunate he saw Drews a few days ago.

“It was important for his family. It was important for us, too,” said Harmsen.

“He was always so calm and so respectful. He always had a smile on his face.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content
“I’m glad you’re writing about him, because he wanted good people to be recognized — and he was good people.”

Detective Constable Patrick Stewart, a co-worker at 52 division, described Drews as down-to-earth and approachable.

“He was very genuine,” said Stewart. “He was well-liked and respected. Even the hospice workers commented on what a classy guest he was — even in his final days, he was thinking of others first.”

Stewart said the two men worked together on a lot of cases. “And he just connected with people naturally. What you’d hope for when dealing with a police officer — that was him. He treated other members and the public with respect.”

Drews loved his co-workers, said Stewart. “And his co-workers really loved him. His last words to me and another colleague were, ‘I love you guys.'”