Canada’s wildfires - conspiracy theories - who's fuelling them

Wise

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Mar 3, 2019
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CBC News: The National on Youtube has the story.

False claims about the origins of Canada’s wildfires have been getting millions of views online. The National’s Adrienne Arsenault talks with investigative reporter Justin Ling about who’s behind the disinformation and why they’re pushing it.

Read more here:

Video of helicopter conducting a planned burn doesn’t show Canada wildfires are a ‘set up’

CLAIM: A video of a helicopter dropping flames on treetops in Canada shows wildfires in the country are "a set up."

AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. The footage shows firefighters conducting a planned burn last weekend on the Donnie Creek wildfire in northeastern British Columbia. The ignition was being used to help contain the fire by taking away fuel, not to spread it.
 

Wise

Electoral Member
Mar 3, 2019
274
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They say to stop burning forests, you have to burn forests through helicopters. Something does not seem right about this. Even if it theoretically works, what if the helicopters accidentally create even more larger fires?

Yeah, empty grounds (to stop fire spread) can be created by chopping down trees and moving trees far away. But, dropping even more fire from helicopters is pretty extreme.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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I just hope they sent out an email notification to all the wildlife.

:?P
Or Carbon Tax the Forrest, in ever increasing amounts annually on April Fools Day…until the forest can no longer afford to be a forest & will just shut the f*ck and be a quiet Savana….or else it’s bank accounts will be frozen & Revenue Canada will ‘have a closer look’ at their affairs.
 
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Wise

Electoral Member
Mar 3, 2019
274
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I just hope they sent out an email notification to all the wildlife.

:?P
They already have "caution: wildlife crossing" signs. Now, all they need is "danger: fire is in that direction" signs.
 

spaminator

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Wildfires unleash dangerous metals from soil, study shows
Scientists discovered what they described as widespread and dangerous levels of toxic chromium in areas of Northern California severely burned by wildfires

Author of the article:Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
Todd Woody
Published Dec 14, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 4 minute read

Extreme heat from California’s climate-driven wildfires is transforming a metal common in soil into an airborne carcinogen that can be inhaled by firefighters and people living downwind of conflagrations, according to first-of-its-kind research.


In a study published Dec. 12 in the journal Nature Communications, Stanford University scientists discovered what they described as widespread and dangerous levels of toxic chromium in areas of Northern California severely burned by wildfires in 2019 and 2020.


“There are vast areas of these metal-rich geologies around the world with landscapes that are ready to burn, such as in Africa, Australia and Canada,” said Scott Fendorf, a professor of earth system science at Stanford University and an author of the paper.

Chromium is relatively ubiquitous: A benign form of the metal called chromium 3 exists in soils derived from chromium-laden rocks found on every continent. But as drought and heat waves prime forests and other wildlands to burn at higher temperatures for longer durations and over larger areas, chromium 3 is emerging as a growing threat.


“Chromium 6 [hexavalent chromium] is the most toxic known type of chromium, and is associated with a litany of significant health issues, such as skin and eye irritation, kidney and liver failure and lung cancer,” said Kimberly Humphrey, a physician and fellow in climate change and human health at Harvard University, who was not involved in the research. “This is an important study, and underscores the need for further research in this area — not only into chromium, but into the effect of fires on other heavy metals present in the soil.”

Australian scientists in 2019 reported that exposing chromium 3 to high temperatures in the laboratory changed the mineral into toxic hexavalent chromium, called chromium 6 (also known as the water contaminant in the 2000 blockbuster Erin Brockovich). The catastrophic wildfires that devastated huge tracts of Northern California in 2019 and 2020 gave the Stanford scientists an opportunity to test whether those lab results would be replicated in nature.


Researcher Alandra Marie Lopez, a Stanford postdoctoral scholar in Earth system science, collected soil and ash from burn sites with chromium-rich soil immediately after the fires were contained. She returned 11 months later for additional sampling. Lopez measured chromium 6 in soil particles small enough to become airborne and found high concentrations of the toxic metal, even after nearly a year had passed.

“We saw a lot of the hexavalent chromium just persisting in the surface layers of the soil,” said Lopez, the paper’s lead author. California was in the midst of a record drought then; without rain to wash away the contaminated soil, the chromium remained.

Edward Burton, a professor of environmental geochemistry and mineralogy at Southern Cross University in Australia, said that finding is significant. “Newly formed hexavalent chromium can persist in surface soil and ash for many months after wildfires, thereby presenting a health risk to those exposed to fine soil particles or ash,” Burton, who was not involved in the research, said in an email.


The researchers didn’t test for the presence of chromium 6 in the air, but the levels found in surface soil suggest the metal could threaten the safety of communities that have experienced wildfire. Firefighters and anyone living downwind of a wildfire would be at most immediate risk if chromium 6 becomes airborne. During a drought — when chromium 6 remains in the ground following a wildfire — any disturbance of the soil would pose a risk, including to workers who rehabilitate burn zones and people who return to recovering wildfire sites to hike and bike.

“This is of particular concern in the western USA because large areas of land are naturally rich in soil chromium and because wildfires appear to be increasing in severity and frequency due to climate change,” added Burton, who led the team that discovered the link between high temperatures and chromium 6.


Rain, like the deluges that broke California’s drought, prevents chromium 6 from lingering in burned areas. But it could cause other problems. “One of the things we’re really interested in exploring is the potential after a post-fire wet season for hexavalent chromium to be mobilized into surface water in burned areas,” said Lopez.

Fendorf noted that more research is also needed on the presence of chromium 6 in wildfire smoke, which already is a health hazard, as well as the potential of other metals found in soil, such as manganese and nickel, to turn toxic. The study’s findings underscore that people should protect themselves during wildfires by wearing protective masks, staying inside and installing air purifiers. He said more controlled burns to reduce fuel loads in forests would lower the intensity of wildfires and thus the volume of chromium 6 in soil.
 

Taxslave2

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Extreme heat from California’s climate-driven wildfires is transforming a metal common in soil into an airborne carcinogen that can be inhaled by firefighters and people living downwind of conflagrations, according to first-of-its-kind research.
Good thing all these poisons are only released from climate driven wild fires and not from arson fires lit by climate change truthers or lightning. Or accidents.
 

spaminator

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Quebec man who blamed wildfires on government pleads guilty to setting 14
Police began watching Pare's Facebook page, where he regularly posted about Quebec's record-breaking forest fire season

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Jan 16, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

CHIBOUGAMAU, Que. — A Quebec man who posted conspiracy theories online that forest fires were being deliberately set by the government has pleaded guilty to starting a series of fires himself that forced hundreds of people from their homes.


Brian Pare, 38, pleaded guilty Monday to 13 counts of arson and one count of arson with disregard for human life at the courthouse in Chibougamau, Que.


Prosecutor Marie-Philippe Charron told the court that two of the 14 fires set by Pare forced the evacuation of around 500 homes in Chapais, Que., a small community located around 425 kilometres northwest of Quebec City.

“On May 31 at 8:30 p.m., the town of Chapais issued a mandatory evacuation order due to the raging fires, in particular the fire at Lake Cavan as well as the airport fire, two fires that are included in the charges and were cause by the accused,” Charron said as she presented an agreed statement of facts.

Residents of the town weren’t able to return home until June 3, Charron said. The Lake Cavan fire was by far the biggest set by Pare, burning nearly 873 hectares of forest, she said. It was also one of the first in a series of five blazes Pare ignited between May 31 and June 1 — the spree started three days after the Quebec government banned open fires in or around forests due to dry weather conditions.


Five fires in a short period of time in the same area raised suspicion, Charron said. Provincial police and first responders “observed that some of the fires had no possible natural cause,” she said, adding that evidence was found that some of the fires had been criminally set.

Charron said police first spoke to Pare on June 2. He had been seen in the area around where a fire had started and was considered a witness. While he denied causing the fires, she said Pare “demonstrated a certain interest in fires” during the interview, which led police to suspect him.

In June, she said, police began watching Pare’s Facebook page, where he regularly posted about Quebec’s record-breaking forest fire season. Among those posts, which remain on his public Facebook page, were claims the fires had been deliberately set by the government to trick people into believing in climate change.


Pare’s ideology and behaviour — including those Facebook posts _ matched a profile of the suspect developed by provincial police specialists, she said.

Charron said police obtained a warrant to install a tracking device on Pare’s vehicle. On Sept. 1 and Sept. 5, she said, that tracking device showed he was at locations where other fires were started.

Pare was arrested on Sept. 7, she said, and when questioned this time, he admitted to starting nine of the fires.

“At this point, the accused admitted he was the one who started the fires and, as his main motivation, claimed he was doing tests to find out whether the forest was really dry or not,” Charron said.

Pare, who has been detained since his arrest, said little during the hearing, only responding “yes” to a series of questions from the judge.

A pre-sentencing report has been ordered that will consider both Pare’s mental state and the risk he poses to public safety. It will be submitted by April 22.

Two other charges — breaking and entering and causing a public nuisance — have been conditionally suspended, Charron said.

More than 700 forest fires burned over 4.5 million hectares of Quebec forest over the summer, according to the province’s forest fire service, which said 99.9 per cent of the fires were sparked by lightning.

 
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spaminator

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More than 100 wildfires still not considered out after B.C.’s record season
The 2023 fire season burned more than 28,000 square kilometres of B.C.

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Ashley Joannou
Published Jan 16, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 4 minute read

More than 100 wildfires are still listed as burning in British Columbia thanks to a combination of a busy wildfire season, extreme drought and generally warmer and drier conditions through December.


Forrest Tower of the BC Wildfire Service said that while it’s not uncommon for some fires to burn through the winter, that number usually hovers around a couple dozen, not the 106 that were listed as active on New Year’s Day.


“In the last 10 years, there were a couple of years where it was zero, but those were in years where we didn’t really have much of a fire season at all,” he said.

“Most times we’re going to have, I would say, 15 or less, that would be the kind of average, if we look at year-to-year on the first of January.”

The 2023 fire season burned more than 28,000 square kilometres of B.C., breaking records and forcing thousands to escape. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in the Okanagan and Shuswap regions.

Tower said July and August are typically B.C’s busiest months for firefighting, which gives crews enough time at the end of their contract to tackle the smaller fires that didn’t require immediate attention.


But the large number of more remote fires in 2023 meant that crews weren’t able to get eyes on every blaze by the last day of their extended contracts in November, he said.

About 80 per cent of the fires that are still considered active are in the hard-to-access northeast region of B.C., which is experiencing extreme drought.

The dry conditions mean the fires burn deep into the ground, particularly in the peat or bog-like conditions that exist in the northeast, Tower said. That makes them even more challenging to put out when firefighters are able to reach them.

“It’s not necessarily that they’re out-of-control and moving and growing. It’s just how deep some of these fires burned and the size of them. It takes a ton of manual labour to dig deep enough or to access some of these more remote fires,” Tower said.


“So, the work needed to extinguish them fully, that we can call them out, is quite (difficult) in some areas.”

Tower said some of the fires that are listed as active are small “spot” fires that may have gone out on their own, but the service has not been able to confirm that.

When there aren’t enough people to go around, the wildfire service relies on enough precipitation before it can confidently label a fire as out.

The rain and snow didn’t come.

The province’s final drought update for 2023, posted at the end of November, lists eight of B.C.’s 34 basins at the two highest levels of risk for adverse drought impacts.

The northeast corner of B.C., which includes the Fort Nelson and Peace regions, remains at the highest level of drought where adverse impacts are almost certain.


The B.C. River Forecast Centre said as of Jan. 1, the provincial snowpack was extremely low, averaging about 56 per cent of normal, with warmer temperatures and less precipitation between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31.

Active fires in winter rarely have visible smoke, Tower said. Instead, burning underground allows them to stay protected and smoulder for longer.

“There’s enough energy there, and enough available fuel, that it can retain that heat, potentially over winter or just longer than normal,” he said.

Some underground fires, often dubbed “zombie fires,” can flare up again in the spring if conditions are right.

Tower said that may be the case for parts of the massive Donnie Creek blaze in the northeast which grew to become B.C.’s largest-ever wildfire in June when it surpassed 5,300 square kilometres.


“If we continue to see really low or abnormally low snowpack and then a warm spring, I would say in some of those larger fires, it’s pretty possible that we would see (flare-ups) happening again,” he said.

Lori Daniels, a professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia, said the province should be prepared for more years with 100 or more fires burning in January.

She said four of the last seven fire seasons have neared or surpassed one million hectares burned.

“That doesn’t mean that we’re still going to cross the million-hectare mark every year, but it means we are already into the pattern where it’s going to become more common rather than unusual,” she said.

Daniels said she and others who monitor fires are concerned about what the upcoming season might look like.


‘It was a hot, dry summer. We had drought preceding the 2023 fire season, we’re still in this drought scenario, and there’s little indication on the horizon that that’s going to change dramatically,” she said.

The wildfire service is still collecting data before it will make any predictions about what the 2024 wildfire season could look like, Tower said.

For now, he warns that the lower snow pack could make areas damaged by fire more accessible this winter and people need to watch for hazards, including falling trees.

“There were so many hectares burned last summer that there still is a high hazard in those areas.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
More than 100 wildfires still not considered out after B.C.’s record season
The 2023 fire season burned more than 28,000 square kilometres of B.C.

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Ashley Joannou
Published Jan 16, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 4 minute read

More than 100 wildfires are still listed as burning in British Columbia thanks to a combination of a busy wildfire season, extreme drought and generally warmer and drier conditions through December.


Forrest Tower of the BC Wildfire Service said that while it’s not uncommon for some fires to burn through the winter, that number usually hovers around a couple dozen, not the 106 that were listed as active on New Year’s Day.


“In the last 10 years, there were a couple of years where it was zero, but those were in years where we didn’t really have much of a fire season at all,” he said.

“Most times we’re going to have, I would say, 15 or less, that would be the kind of average, if we look at year-to-year on the first of January.”

The 2023 fire season burned more than 28,000 square kilometres of B.C., breaking records and forcing thousands to escape. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in the Okanagan and Shuswap regions.

Tower said July and August are typically B.C’s busiest months for firefighting, which gives crews enough time at the end of their contract to tackle the smaller fires that didn’t require immediate attention.


But the large number of more remote fires in 2023 meant that crews weren’t able to get eyes on every blaze by the last day of their extended contracts in November, he said.

About 80 per cent of the fires that are still considered active are in the hard-to-access northeast region of B.C., which is experiencing extreme drought.

The dry conditions mean the fires burn deep into the ground, particularly in the peat or bog-like conditions that exist in the northeast, Tower said. That makes them even more challenging to put out when firefighters are able to reach them.

“It’s not necessarily that they’re out-of-control and moving and growing. It’s just how deep some of these fires burned and the size of them. It takes a ton of manual labour to dig deep enough or to access some of these more remote fires,” Tower said.


“So, the work needed to extinguish them fully, that we can call them out, is quite (difficult) in some areas.”

Tower said some of the fires that are listed as active are small “spot” fires that may have gone out on their own, but the service has not been able to confirm that.

When there aren’t enough people to go around, the wildfire service relies on enough precipitation before it can confidently label a fire as out.

The rain and snow didn’t come.

The province’s final drought update for 2023, posted at the end of November, lists eight of B.C.’s 34 basins at the two highest levels of risk for adverse drought impacts.

The northeast corner of B.C., which includes the Fort Nelson and Peace regions, remains at the highest level of drought where adverse impacts are almost certain.


The B.C. River Forecast Centre said as of Jan. 1, the provincial snowpack was extremely low, averaging about 56 per cent of normal, with warmer temperatures and less precipitation between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31.

Active fires in winter rarely have visible smoke, Tower said. Instead, burning underground allows them to stay protected and smoulder for longer.

“There’s enough energy there, and enough available fuel, that it can retain that heat, potentially over winter or just longer than normal,” he said.

Some underground fires, often dubbed “zombie fires,” can flare up again in the spring if conditions are right.

Tower said that may be the case for parts of the massive Donnie Creek blaze in the northeast which grew to become B.C.’s largest-ever wildfire in June when it surpassed 5,300 square kilometres.


“If we continue to see really low or abnormally low snowpack and then a warm spring, I would say in some of those larger fires, it’s pretty possible that we would see (flare-ups) happening again,” he said.

Lori Daniels, a professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia, said the province should be prepared for more years with 100 or more fires burning in January.

She said four of the last seven fire seasons have neared or surpassed one million hectares burned.

“That doesn’t mean that we’re still going to cross the million-hectare mark every year, but it means we are already into the pattern where it’s going to become more common rather than unusual,” she said.

Daniels said she and others who monitor fires are concerned about what the upcoming season might look like.


‘It was a hot, dry summer. We had drought preceding the 2023 fire season, we’re still in this drought scenario, and there’s little indication on the horizon that that’s going to change dramatically,” she said.

The wildfire service is still collecting data before it will make any predictions about what the 2024 wildfire season could look like, Tower said.

For now, he warns that the lower snow pack could make areas damaged by fire more accessible this winter and people need to watch for hazards, including falling trees.

“There were so many hectares burned last summer that there still is a high hazard in those areas.”
It's not December any longer.
 
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spaminator

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Nova Scotia man charged with igniting massive Barrington Lake wildfire
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Jan 18, 2024 • 1 minute read
Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province's history.
Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province's history.
HALIFAX — Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for allegedly lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province’s recorded history.


The Barrington Lake fire southwest of Shelburne, N.S., was ignited on May 26, 2023, and burned 23,000 hectares before it was brought under control on June 13 and extinguished more than a month later.


The province’s Natural Resources Department issued a statement today saying Dalton Clark Stewart of Villagedale, N.S., was charged Wednesday with three offences under the Forests Act.

Stewart is accused of: lighting a fire on privately owned land without permission of the owner; failing to take reasonable efforts to prevent the spread of a fire; and leaving a fire unattended.

Violations under the act can result in a maximum fine of $50,000 and up to six months in jail.

Stewart is scheduled to appear in Shelburne provincial court on March 7.
 
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pgs

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Nova Scotia man charged with igniting massive Barrington Lake wildfire
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Jan 18, 2024 • 1 minute read
Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province's history.
Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province's history.
HALIFAX — Charges have been laid against a 22-year-old Nova Scotia man for allegedly lighting a fire last May that grew to become the largest wildfire in the province’s recorded history.


The Barrington Lake fire southwest of Shelburne, N.S., was ignited on May 26, 2023, and burned 23,000 hectares before it was brought under control on June 13 and extinguished more than a month later.


The province’s Natural Resources Department issued a statement today saying Dalton Clark Stewart of Villagedale, N.S., was charged Wednesday with three offences under the Forests Act.

Stewart is accused of: lighting a fire on privately owned land without permission of the owner; failing to take reasonable efforts to prevent the spread of a fire; and leaving a fire unattended.

Violations under the act can result in a maximum fine of $50,000 and up to six months in jail.

Stewart is scheduled to appear in Shelburne provincial court on March 7.
And how many times did I here the cause was man made climate change ? Man made all right .
 

Taxslave2

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Aug 13, 2022
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And how many times did I hear the cause was man made climate change ? Man made all right .
There were a lot of climate change truther caused fires. Apparently, climate change needs help with the ignition.