Top Eight Reasons NOT to immigrate to Canada (Reasons Not To Live In Canada)


Frappuccino Dibs
#31
Some people should stop analysing and try living.

Every country has it's bad points. IF an individual can't live with those bad points then they should bugger off to somewhere where they will be happy.
 
Reverend Blair
#32
These are the anti-Canadians, Mr. Dibs. Their constant negativity about all things Canadian is the only biggest problem this country has.
 
DasFX
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by Numure

Quebec has been around for over 400 years, btw.

Actually Quebec has been around for thousands of years. You forget that there were people living here before. Are you only concerned about the time after the French arrived? Is everything before that irrelevant? You forget that the word "Quebec" is not a French word; it is native!

Based on what I can infer from your comment, the English could say that Quebec has only been around for 246 years, and classify everything before Sept 13, 1759 (The day Wolfe kicked Montcalm's ***) as insignificant. Would that be right though?
 
Jo Canadian
#34
Quote:

You forget that the word "Quebec" is not a French word; it is native!

Well, that's news to me. I guess you can still learn something new every day. At least it's not a tongue twister like Iqaluktutiaq.
 
DasFX
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by Jo Canadian

Quote:

You forget that the word "Quebec" is not a French word; it is native!

Well, that's news to me. I guess you can still learn something new every day. At least it's not a tongue twister like Iqaluktutiaq.

Here is some further info:

http://sen.parl.gc.ca/nsibbeston/Brochure.htm

Canada itself came from the word, kanata, meaning village, which, from its repetition, French explorer Jacques Cartier took to be the name of the entire country.

Newfoundland has one of the oldest place names in Canada. It was called the “new founde isle” by John Cabot, who arrived there in 1497, and began appearing in official English records as “New founde launde” as early as 1501. The French version, “Terre Neuve” was first recorded in 1510 and the name became generally accepted shortly thereafter.

The name Quebec was first applied to the area around the present-day city and appeared in various spellings from 1601 on. The name derives from an Algonquin word for “narrow passage” or “strait,” referring to the narrowing of the St. Lawrence River at Cape Diamond.

In 1621, Sir William Alexander was granted a tract of land by the British Crown lying between New England and Newfoundland and called Nova Scotia, Latin for New Scotland. In 1713, the boundaries were fixed by the Treaty of Utrecht and included not only present day Nova Scotia but also New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

P.E.I. was separated from Nova Scotia in 1769 as St. John’s Island and received its present name in 1798 to honour Prince Edward, Duke of Kent.

New Brunswick became a separate province in 1784 and was named as a compliment to King George III, who was descended from the House of Brunswick.

The name Ontario was first applied to the lake in 1641 and only later came to signify the land next to it. It may have derived from the local aboriginal word onitariio meaning “beautiful lake” or possibly kanadario meaning “sparkling waters.”

The origin of the name Manitoba is not entirely certain but was probably first applied to Lake Manitoba. It may have derived from the Assiniboine words mini tobow meaning Lake of the Prairie or Lac des Prairies as it was called by French explorer La Verendrye. More likely it comes from the Cree maniotowpow meaning “the strait of the spirit,” arising from the belief that a minito or spirit inhabited Manitoba Island in the lake.

Saskatchewan also has watery origins, with the name being derived for the Cree term, Kisisskatchewani Sipi, or “swift-flowing river,” their name for what came to be called the Saskatchewan River. Explorer Anthony Henday rendered this as Keiskatchewan, which evolved over the years into its current version. Saskatchewan was officially adopted in 1882 when a separate district was created within the Northwest Territories.

Alberta breaks the trend of aboriginal names and first appeared in 1882 with the creation of the district of Alberta within the Northwest Territories. It was named in honour of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, daughter of Queen Victoria and wife of the Marquess of Lorne who was Governor General of Canada at the time.

British Columbia (formerly known as British Caledonia) also owes its name to Queen Victoria who officially proclaimed it as the colony’s name in 1858. Columbia came from the name of the river, which in turn had been named by American Captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia.

Yukon comes from yu-kun-ah, meaning “great river” in the local aboriginal language. It was first applied to the area in 1846 by John Bell, an employee of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

The name for the territory Nunavut is an Inuktitut word meaning "our land."

Northwest Territories - No explanation needed, but they may change their name.
 
Jo Canadian
#36
Nice stuff man. Most of the stuff I am aware of but naming alberta after a princess is funny. I just can't remember when the NWT recieved it's official name after being called Ruperts land for a dogs age.

My buddy in Nunavut was also happy with the choice of name, it was selected by the help from his father in 1992 which was when the concept was starting to take shape. It's too bad though that the Gov't chose to recognize Nunavut on April Fools day.
 
LaoWai
#37
Whenever someone asks me in China to help them fill outa form for a Canadian Visa or Immigration related document, I tell them to stay in China.

Well educated Chinese people still believe Canada is a land of opportunity, where all people are treated equally. I quickly disabuse them of those notions.

I point out, despite what propaganda is promulgated about Canada by the Government, the country is a cesspool for most working people, especially new immigrants.

The questions I ask potential immigrants to Canada usually stops them in their tracks: "Why would you leave your privleged position (engineer, economist, lawyer, businessman, whatever) in China where the economy is booming to go to a country where the economy is stagnant, you will be on the bottom rung doing crappy jobs working longer and harder to not even come close to achieving the middle-class lifestyle you currently have here? Are you ready for the daily racism of those polite Canadians who deny posessing any animosity towards any ethnic group, but in reality when they are at home curse all those Chinese and other foreign parasite for destroying the country?
 
I think not
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by LaoWai

Whenever someone asks me in China to help them fill outa form for a Canadian Visa or Immigration related document, I tell them to stay in China.

Well educated Chinese people still believe Canada is a land of opportunity, where all people are treated equally. I quickly disabuse them of those notions.

I point out, despite what propaganda is promulgated about Canada by the Government, the country is a cesspool for most working people, especially new immigrants.

The questions I ask potential immigrants to Canada usually stops them in their tracks: "Why would you leave your privleged position (engineer, economist, lawyer, businessman, whatever) in China where the economy is booming to go to a country where the economy is stagnant, you will be on the bottom rung doing crappy jobs working longer and harder to not even come close to achieving the middle-class lifestyle you currently have here? Are you ready for the daily racism of those polite Canadians who deny posessing any animosity towards any ethnic group, but in reality when they are at home curse all those Chinese and other foreign parasite for destroying the country?

May I ask how you have come to these conclusions?
 
Twila
#39
LaiWai, you should definately warn your people about gwai lo. evil round eyed white devils that we are.
 
Jay
#40
I know I'm not going to stop him....
 
peapod
#41
Oh come on folks, it just Giraldi thinking its halloween, and trying to trick us with his bad costume. I know that guys writing anywhere, unless he has figured out how to clone himself...Crazytown I tell ya


bwahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
 
The Philosopher
#42
Canada is vastely cultureless. Canada is a compilation of multiple cultures. The most dominant of these cultures as stated correctly is the American one. The most prominent forms of music in Canada are American ones (Jazz, Rock, Rap, and Techno). Inside of this American cultural domination are smaller cultures with a lot of them acting independently of the rest of the nation. Look at Quebec, look at Chinatowns, and such.

I mean, the reason why we have such a centralized government system is because we have too diverse of cultures. When you look at Canada you do not see much that is distinctively Canadian. In fact you can only name a handfull of things that are distincitively Canadian. But when you do that it is only regionally Canadian. Inukshuks are not really Canadians, they are more of a native thing.

Things like kitchen parties can be traced to Gaelic roots.

I do agree that Canada has no distinctive culture, but I disagree with that being a reason not to come to Canada. In fact, that's a better reason to come to Canada. Why to go Romania? You'll only see one culture there. If you come to Canada you can see dozens of cultures.
 
Jay
#43
"I mean, the reason why we have such a centralized government system is because we have too diverse of cultures. "

really?
 
EagleSmack
#44
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila

Canadian Food
Canadian Bacon
Canadian Maple syrup
Smarties.

Canadian Culture:
Hockey
Beer
Kitchen parties (NS)
Boony Bashes (BC)
RCMP-Can't find that anywhere else

Quote:

People living in Canada, still identify themselves as to where they 'originally' came from.

Cause we never hear the term Afro American used to describe a certain ethnic group.

Theres a lot more, but someone gets the point I'm sure.

C

Canadian Maple Syrup? Never heard of it.

I've heard of Vermont Maple Syrup... I imagine they are the same.

The first I heard of Canadian Bacon (ie smoked ham) is when McDonalds came out with the Egg McMuffin. I think they used that because it fit so nicely on that American Capitalist Breakfast Icon Sandwich.

Thanks for the Canadian Bacon Canada!
 
EmmaDibbs
#45
I would say that the guy who wrote the Top Ten B@£*L**cks is not very well travelled. I mean we pay 17.5% tax on everything we buy, the cost of living is at least 2 times more than in Canada and the wages are not!! One of the great attractions to Canada is it's diverse culture a mix from around the World. The immigration system is great(unless then turn us down...then I will think it's crap) we are copying it in the UK now to try and control immigration a bit.

Canada is great- who cares if there is no Canadian food- chill and have a curry!!
 
Reverend Blair
#46
We do have our own food though. Where else can you get perogies with cheddar cheese in them?
 
Twila
#47
Quote:

Canada is vastely cultureless. Canada is a compilation of multiple cultures.

I think I know what your attempting to say, but isn't it impossible to have No culture? That in itself would be the culture.

If you look back through history you see how people migrated from 1 place to another taking with them their traditions. How long must a custom, tradition be in a location before it's considered part of that culture?
 
Reverend Blair
#48
The charges of us being cultureless are unfounded allegations made by ill-informed sources.

I'm practicing my poli-speak. How is it?
 
EmmaDibbs
#49
Sounds good...you even sound like you know what you're talking about!!
 
Reverend Blair
#50
Oh good. I've been having trouble with the evading the subject part, but I'm working on it. I was watching CPAC the other day and I kept track...politicians from all parties spoke for one hour and seventeen minutes without actually saying anything. Then I switched to NewsWorld and watched the official spinners (one from each party)...in 15 minutes or so one of them made one point. It made the other three turn red, like he had broken some kind of code of conduct or something.

I think it's because they wear ties.
 
Toro
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

We do have our own food though. Where else can you get perogies with cheddar cheese in them?

I can get them here in Florida frozen in the grocery store.
 
Toro
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

But you are lumping in all americans with that statement, and that is not true. There are many that know alot about canada. Thats why they are buying alot of land right here on my island. Quite a few of from where you live, they seems to love cortez island, new yorkers. So they found out about lotusland somehow

One of the Canadian polling firms did a poll a few years ago asking Americans what the biggest industries were in Canada. Number 4 on the list was "fur-trapping", right behind "hockey equipment manufacturing." Americans don't know much about Canada.
 
bluealberta
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by Toro

Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

But you are lumping in all americans with that statement, and that is not true. There are many that know alot about canada. Thats why they are buying alot of land right here on my island. Quite a few of from where you live, they seems to love cortez island, new yorkers. So they found out about lotusland somehow

One of the Canadian polling firms did a poll a few years ago asking Americans what the biggest industries were in Canada. Number 4 on the list was "fur-trapping", right behind "hockey equipment manufacturing." Americans don't know much about Canada.

You are right, the southern states no little about Canada, but the bordering Northern Us States generally have a pretty good idea about us.

I think that most Canadians really know little about the US, just as most US citizens know little about Canada. The really sad part is that a lot of Canadians know little about Canada, either.
 
peapod
#54
I don't really agree with that statement bluealberta. I think alot of canadians know alot more about the US than their own citizens, especially their history. The present may be most unattractive, but their past is rich and interesting.
Some of the best writers are american, many of us have american friends or relatives that are american. But we are curious about things by nature anyway, at least here in lotusland, that is british columbia, the true west everything on the other side of the rockies...blah!
Even my own eastern uncle is a snowbird, phones the whole family tree always begging for company whists he is down there, blah! if I want to see a grapefruit, I can go to the grocery store.
 
EagleSmack
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Toro

Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

But you are lumping in all americans with that statement, and that is not true. There are many that know alot about canada. Thats why they are buying alot of land right here on my island. Quite a few of from where you live, they seems to love cortez island, new yorkers. So they found out about lotusland somehow


One of the Canadian polling firms did a poll a few years ago asking Americans what the biggest industries were in Canada. Number 4 on the list was "fur-trapping", right behind "hockey equipment manufacturing." Americans don't know much about Canada.

LMAO

That was hilarious Toro. This truly brightened my day. I always get a kick out of surveys like this. Fur Trapping had to be a leading question though. I wonder if they were given a list of industries to rate. Most people wouldn't know a fur trap unless they stepped in one.
 
EagleSmack
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

I don't really agree with that statement bluealberta. I think alot of canadians know alot more about the US than their own citizens, especially their history. The present may be most unattractive, but their past is rich and interesting.
Some of the best writers are american, many of us have american friends or relatives that are american. But we are curious about things by nature anyway, at least here in lotusland, that is british columbia, the true west everything on the other side of the rockies...blah!
Even my own eastern uncle is a snowbird, phones the whole family tree always begging for company whists he is down there, blah! if I want to see a grapefruit, I can go to the grocery store.

Hey... I did a report on the Royal Newfoundland Regt. in the Great War. I got an A too.
 
I think not
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack

Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

I don't really agree with that statement bluealberta. I think alot of canadians know alot more about the US than their own citizens, especially their history. The present may be most unattractive, but their past is rich and interesting.
Some of the best writers are american, many of us have american friends or relatives that are american. But we are curious about things by nature anyway, at least here in lotusland, that is british columbia, the true west everything on the other side of the rockies...blah!
Even my own eastern uncle is a snowbird, phones the whole family tree always begging for company whists he is down there, blah! if I want to see a grapefruit, I can go to the grocery store.

Hey... I did a report on the Royal Newfoundland Regt. in the Great War. I got an A too.

Funny you say that, I wrote an essay on the Canadian contribution of D-Day. And I got an A also
 
Harris 4 PM
#58
The "no culture" thing pisses me off the most.

This is a lie that is especially promoted by French nationalists I dont know why they do it personally, some way to support their cause maybe? Dunno, but anyone is either a fool or isn't looking hard enough that thinks there is not a distinctly Canadian culture.
 
I think not
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by Harris 4 PM

The "no culture" thing pisses me off the most.

This is a lie that is especially promoted by French nationalists I dont know why they do it personally, some way to support their cause maybe? Dunno, but anyone is either a fool or isn't looking hard enough that thinks there is not a distictly Canadian culture.

I'd like some info on that Harris, would you mind sharing some of your views? Thanks
 
EagleSmack
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not

Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackQuote: Originally Posted by peapodI don't really agree with that statement bluealberta. I think alot of canadians know alot more about the US than their own citizens, especially their history. The present may be most unattractive, but their past is rich and interesting.
Some of the best writers are american, many of us have american friends or relatives that are american. But we are curious about things by nature anyway, at least here in lotusland, that is british columbia, the true west everything on the other side of the rockies...blah!
Even my own eastern uncle is a snowbird, phones the whole family tree always begging for company whists he is down there, blah! if I want to see a grapefruit, I can go to the grocery store.Hey... I did a report on the Royal Newfoundland Regt. in the Great War. I got an A too.Funny you say that, I wrote an essay on the Canadian contribution of D-Day. And I got an A also

Quote has been trimmed
I wonder how many Canadians can say they did something as equal as what we did? I am sure they would not have recieved a good grade for doing anything that shed a positive light on the US Military in any theater.
 

Similar Threads

33
Immigrate to Canada
by Mikedavidson | Aug 4th, 2009
181
Why immigrate to the US?
by Walter | Aug 2nd, 2008
no new posts